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Musical Chairs

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November 9, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
The news this week that the Broadway production of David Mamet's “Glengarry Glen Ross” would delay its opening night by nearly a month, to Dec. 8, means that a Broadway already starved for some sizzle this season will have to wait a while longer. Producers said the delay was related to Superstorm Sandy. The storm canceled a few days of rehearsal, requiring opening night to be pushed, and Dec. 8 was the next available ideal night, they said. Yeah, we're skeptical too. So what does the delay change?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
The decision of Rep. George Miller to retire when his term ends could affect the political dynamic in the state Capitol. State Sen. Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord) said Monday he will run for Miller's 11 th Congressional District seat. If he wins, that is likely to trigger Assembly members from the area to run for his state Senate seat, including Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla (D-Concord). “I'm running for Congress to help bring an end to the brinkmanship and gridlock in Washington," DeSaulnier said, "so that we can move forward with President Obama's agenda of creating more good paying jobs, growing our middle class, investing in our infrastructure, increasing access to healthcare, advancing the use of renewable and homegrown energy, enhancing our education systems, and making the United States a leader in innovation around the globe.” DeSaulnier had also been the biggest competitor to Sen. Kevin De Leon (D-Los Angeles)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
The decision of Rep. George Miller to retire when his term ends could affect the political dynamic in the state Capitol. State Sen. Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord) said Monday he will run for Miller's 11 th Congressional District seat. If he wins, that is likely to trigger Assembly members from the area to run for his state Senate seat, including Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla (D-Concord). “I'm running for Congress to help bring an end to the brinkmanship and gridlock in Washington," DeSaulnier said, "so that we can move forward with President Obama's agenda of creating more good paying jobs, growing our middle class, investing in our infrastructure, increasing access to healthcare, advancing the use of renewable and homegrown energy, enhancing our education systems, and making the United States a leader in innovation around the globe.” DeSaulnier had also been the biggest competitor to Sen. Kevin De Leon (D-Los Angeles)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
You may have heard or read or woke up suddenly thinking that we are living in a New Golden Age of Television. Some call it the platinum age, which sounds a little too Rodeo Drive to me. But let them have their fun. Most of this new golden/platinum age talk centers on drama, and mostly cable drama, which connotes seriousness and ambition (and sex and death); we are still living in the age of "The Sopranos. " When, on Dec. 10, the American Film Institute named its Top 10 shows of 2013, only one sitcom - HBO's political farce "Veep" - was among them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
You may have heard or read or woke up suddenly thinking that we are living in a New Golden Age of Television. Some call it the platinum age, which sounds a little too Rodeo Drive to me. But let them have their fun. Most of this new golden/platinum age talk centers on drama, and mostly cable drama, which connotes seriousness and ambition (and sex and death); we are still living in the age of "The Sopranos. " When, on Dec. 10, the American Film Institute named its Top 10 shows of 2013, only one sitcom - HBO's political farce "Veep" - was among them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2001 | Jana J. Monji
Musical chairs is a child's game, but in Joel Hirschhorn (book, words and music) and Jennifer Carter's (story) musical by that name, it represents the somber struggle of a captive six-person orchestra. There are some heartfelt moments, well-tuned by Jules Aaron's astute direction, but the music sometimes gets in the way of character development. In the cozy confines of the El Portal Center's Circle Theatre, the voices and canned music can at times be overwhelming.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1988 | LIBBY SLATE
Like Old King Cole, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra this year is calling for its fiddlers three--three concertmasters, that is. The ensemble, which begins its 20th-anniversary season with concerts at the Wiltern Theatre tonight and Ambassador Auditorium on Saturday, recently announced the appointment of co-concertmasters Kathleen Lenski and Ralph Morrison. They will be in addition to Iona Brown, the orchestra's music director, who also serves as a concertmaster.
NEWS
January 28, 1992 | DAVE LESHER and BILL STALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even before the state Supreme Court gave final approval to a new set of political maps Monday, the campaign battles to represent Orange County in Sacramento and Washington were already well under way. Rather than waste valuable campaign time, many local candidates announced plans to run for office on the assumption that the court's final decision would not significantly change the political landscape.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
Top music industry executives at Warner Music and MCA have spent much of the past 18 months in a high-stakes game of musical chairs. * July, 1994: Robert Krasnow, chairman of Warner's Elektra Entertainment, resigns and later signs a deal to run his own label at MCA. * August, 1994: Mo Ostin, who ran Warner Bros. Records for three decades, announces his resignation after being told he would have to report to Warner executive Doug Morris. In September, 1995, Ostin and former Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | LYNN STEINBERG
Ruth Armentrout was filled with a new sense of conviction as she soaked up the sunshine one recent Sunday afternoon in Sherman Oaks. "We're not the cultural wasteland people have been saying," she pronounced. Armentrout and about 40 others had just gathered in a designer home tucked in the hills south of Ventura Boulevard to hear the Shostakovich Trio in E Minor, opus 57.
OPINION
December 17, 2013
Re "A political game of musical chairs," Dec. 13 Jessica A. Levinson does a good job of explaining how term limits exacerbate the cynical and costly practice of office-jumping by elected officials. If only there was something better than term limits. Well, there could be. I suggest we replace term limits with a system in which an officeholder can run for a third term, but he or she would have to win with at least 55% of the vote. For a fourth term, the threshold would be 60%. What this could achieve, besides giving these office hogs less reason to engage in musical chairs, is an opportunity to keep someone in office if the constituents want it. California is a laboratory for many new ideas and innovations.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
In a multimillion-dollar twist on celebrity musical chairs, singer-actress Jessica Simpson has purchased Sharon and Ozzy Osbourne's estate in Hidden Hills for $11.5 million, public records show. The Cape Cod-inspired mansion, built in 2001, sits on a 2.5-acre promontory off a cul-de-sac in the gated community. It features a paneled study with fireplace, a home theater and studio area, six en suite bedrooms and a guest apartment with kitchenette. The family room of the 11,000-square-foot home has sliding barn doors and a reclaimed brick fireplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By David Ng
Audiences who attended Sunday's performance of "Tribes," Nina Raine's play currently running at the Mark Taper Forum, were able to witness a rare bit of understudy musical chairs. Center Theatre Group said actress Gayle Rankin, who played the the role of Ruth, had to leave the production for a different project. As a result, Meghan Mae O'Neill, the original understudy for the roles of Ruth and Sylvia, took over the part of Ruth. To fill the role of understudy for Ruth, CTG said it brought in another actress, Sherill Turner.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
San Francisco's Kronos Quartet will play musical chairs this spring. A new cellist, USC graduate Sunny Jungin Yang will replace Jeffrey Zeigler, who is leaving Kronos to pursue solo projects and will join the faculty of Mannes College the New School for Music in New York. Yang, 28, was born in Incheon, South Korea and grew up in Pretoria, South Africa. She studied at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. Distinguished cellist Ralph Kirshbaum served as a mentor at Manchester, England's Royal Northern Conservatory of Music and USC, where Yang earned a master's degree in music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
The news this week that the Broadway production of David Mamet's “Glengarry Glen Ross” would delay its opening night by nearly a month, to Dec. 8, means that a Broadway already starved for some sizzle this season will have to wait a while longer. Producers said the delay was related to Superstorm Sandy. The storm canceled a few days of rehearsal, requiring opening night to be pushed, and Dec. 8 was the next available ideal night, they said. Yeah, we're skeptical too. So what does the delay change?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2012 | By Burt Bacharach
It was my great good fortune to have met Hal David, who was introduced to me by Eddy Wolpin - the man who ran Famous Music in New York's fabled Brill Building at 1619 Broadway. I had been out on the road conducting and playing piano for the Ames Brothers and had decided to quit and come back to New York City to try and write pop songs. In those days, the Brill Building, also known as the Music Factory, was filled with songwriters playing musical chairs, writing with different partners each day. I worked with Hal maybe two afternoons a week.
NEWS
November 20, 1986 | JONI WINN HILTON
When I was growing up, you dropped clothespins into a Mason jar, or you threw a raw egg back and forth. Sometimes there were scavenger hunts or spook alleys, but most of the games' ingredients came out of a kitchen drawer. Like all my playmates, I loved those parties and relished the laughter and chatter of noisy kids who knew how to make their own fun. But you don't see many birthday parties like that anymore.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | CRAIG QUINTANA, Staff Writer
Two City Council incumbents who are running for mayor hope the April election will end the turmoil that has made recent municipal elections resemble a game of musical chairs rather than a carefully considered changing of the guard. Last March, then-Mayor Jack B. White and Councilman Leo W. King lost their seats in a bitter recall election. But just four months later, in a special election to fill the vacancies created by the recall, King was elected mayor and White won the open council seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2012
Shark movies have been suffering under comparisons to "Jaws" for more than 35 years, and with good reason: Steven Spielberg's 1975 waterborne frightfest remains a classic. "Dark Tide," directed with hopelessly flagging energy by John Stockwell, barely musters up enough interest to be thuddingly bad. Halle Berry stars as a shark-loving, Cape Town-based marine biologist who's backslid into a life of guided tours since losing close friends to great-white attacks on one of her uncaged, communing-with-sharks excursions a year prior.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012
UNDERRATED Max Von Sydow in "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close" : Though much of Stephen Daldry's well-intended adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer's Sept. 11 recovery novel comes off heavy-handed and a bit precious, this veteran actor adds a grizzled note of genuine humanity as a mysterious figure from young Oskar Schell's past. Von Sydow doesn't speak a word of dialogue, but his warm, quirky performance says more than any other in the film. Blockbuster video stores : With a '90s revival in full swing, there may be no more vivid time capsule of the decade than these blue-and-gold relics, if you can still find one near you. With most rentals a Red Box-fighting 99 cents, it's a surprisingly workable option when all else fails.
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