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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2012 | By Marcia Adair
In the Paraguayan capital of Asuncion, there is a village called Cateura built practically on top of the city's main landfill.  Families eke out a living sorting through the trash and selling whatever valuables they can find.  Like many high poverty areas, drugs and gangs are rampant and children grow up with little hope of ever doing much more than sorting trash.   A trailer for a new documentary about Favio Chavez, a local ecologist and...
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014
The morning after firebrand singer Valerie June's swing through L.A. to open for Sharon Jones at the Wiltern on Tuesday, she had a whirlwind day of activities related to promoting her acclaimed 2013 album “Pushin' Against a Stone” before hopping a plane for her next stop: three nights with Jones at the venerable Fillmore auditorium in San Francisco. As engaging as “Pushin' Against a Stone” is, it didn't fully capture the charm and energy of her live performance, which doesn't surprise the 32-year-old Jackson, Tenn., native greatly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Musicians can breathe a little easier while traveling, with the submission to Congress of a U.S. Department of Agriculture report addressing provisions of the Lacey Act that protect endangered wildlife, fish and plants. The legislation had been causing snafus for musicians carrying vintage instruments made of materials protected by the act. Since a major amendment to the century-old act was passed in 2008, vintage instruments as well as newer ones made from old stockpiles of exotic woods have come under increased scrutiny by customs officials when musicians enter or re-enter the U.S. with those instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Inside the North Hollywood prop house History for Hire, a technician clamps down a sheet of pearl finish plastic and cuts a strip to fasten around the wooden hoop of a Slingerland bass drum. Another worker is busy rebuilding a black Ludwig drum to precisely match the same set - right down to the manufacturer's keystone logo - used by the Four Seasons during a 1966 performance on the Ed Sullivan show. FOR THE RECORD: History for Hire: An article in the Aug. 28 Business section about North Hollywood prop house History for Hire included a photo caption that made a reference to the testing of Marshall amplifiers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
The Los Angeles Unified School District is seeking donations of used band and orchestra instruments that secondary school musicians can use for free. Whether the instrument is a moldy oldie or nearly new, repair technicians will restore it to playing condition for use by student musicians, said John Rosell, district supervisor for musical instrument repair.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | United Press International
Looking for a tried-and-true toy that doesn't need batteries and will probably last a lifetime? Consider a gift of music. Musical instruments have long been popular holiday presents for children of all ages. For a gift that is educational as well as fun, the American Music Conference offers these suggestions: --Small children may enjoy simple instruments such as harmonicas and recorders, as well as percussion instruments (tambourines, triangles or drums).
MAGAZINE
June 28, 1987 | MATTHEW SMITH, Matthew Smith is a Los Angeles writer.
When Adolphe Sax, perhaps the most prolific instrument maker who ever lived, created the saxophone and dozens of other inventions in France in the mid-19th Century, he was vilified by jealous competitors and conservative musicians with an extraordinary fury. Band members refused to play his unconventional instruments, he was maligned in the press, a suspicious fire damaged his factory, he was even physically attacked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frederick Selch, 72, an advertising executive and magazine publisher who collected hundreds of antique musical instruments, died Aug. 22 of cancer at his home in New York City. Selch began collecting almost 50 years ago and owned more than 300 instruments by 1977. That same year, he founded the Federal Music Society, an organization dedicated to performing music from the Colonial-Federal period. The group's 26 players used instruments in Selch's collection to perform in more than 70 concerts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | LORENZA MUNOZ and LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite protests from street musicians, the Laguna Beach City Council on Tuesday night revised its noise ordinance to include the playing of musical instruments. The ordinance allows police officers to cite street musicians for disturbing "any reasonable person of normal sensitiveness" with loud music. Laguna Beach Police Chief Neil Purcell emphasized that police officers would carry recording devices and would warn musicians about complaints before issuing a citation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1997
The BEEM Foundation for the Advancement of Music has donated tens of thousands of dollars worth of new instruments for students at Crenshaw and Fremont high schools in Los Angeles. BEEM (which stands for Black Experience as Expressed through Music) was able to provide the instruments through a grant from McDonnell Douglas, said Betty Cox, founder and president of the foundation. A total of $50,000 worth of instruments was donated to the two South L.A. schools and to Westchester High.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Musicians can breathe a little easier while traveling, with the submission to Congress of a U.S. Department of Agriculture report addressing provisions of the Lacey Act that protect endangered wildlife, fish and plants. The legislation had been causing snafus for musicians carrying vintage instruments made of materials protected by the act. Since a major amendment to the century-old act was passed in 2008, vintage instruments as well as newer ones made from old stockpiles of exotic woods have come under increased scrutiny by customs officials when musicians enter or re-enter the U.S. with those instruments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
HALF MOON BAY, Calif. - The piano was delivered to its bluff-top perch under cover of fog nearly two weeks ago. It is scheduled to leave this coastal enclave in a burst of flames on Sunday. In between the fog and the fire, musician and sculptor Mauro Ffortissimo has been treating his neighbors to an illicit outdoor concert series grandly dubbed Sunset Piano. Chopin, Debussy, a tango or two. The performances are timed to end the moment the sun sinks below the horizon. He plays to cyclists and dog walkers, babies in strollers, his landlady in a folding chair, the charmed, the perplexed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Downtown L.A.'s Staples Center may be home to the Grammys, but it's a relatively nondescript industrial complex in Burbank that's attracting some of the awards show's most notable nominees this week. Fender Musical Instruments' new artist showroom has become a hub for well-known musicians of all stripes. And with the Grammy Awards scheduled to air Sunday, business is brisk. Just as dress designers clamor to get their gowns on Oscar contenders, makers of musical equipment such as Fender are doing their best to get their newest products in the hands of Grammy-nominated pop stars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2013 | By Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Paul Tanner, a trombonist with the Glenn Miller Orchestra who became a prominent jazz educator at UCLA and created an unusual electronic musical instrument heard on the Beach Boys' classic 1966 hit "Good Vibrations," has died. He was 95. Tanner died of pneumonia Tuesday at an assisted-living facility near his home in Carlsbad, Calif., said his wife, Jan. Tanner was a member of the Miller Orchestra, one of the best-known swing bands of the 1930s and '40s, for most of the orchestra's existence of less than a decade.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Susan Denley
If you're getting excited about the annual Grammy Awards scheduled for Sunday night, you can dress the part with the new Grammy Label collection of tanks and T-shirts that is scheduled to launch in Los Angeles on Wednesday. Grammy Label makes luxury basics each season, under appointment by the Recording Academy, drawing inspiration from music and musical artists. A portion of proceeds from sales of the clothes is earmarked to pay for musical instruments for Grammy Camp , a summer program that brings teens together with professional artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By Donna Perlmutter
Loud grumbles can be heard by travelers at this busy time of year under normal circumstances, but what is that noise going on with itinerant virtuosos carrying on board million-dollar-plus Strads and Guarneris on their way to concert dates? It's the sound of bureaucracy. And it's overtaking what used to be a well-understood, mutually respectful transaction - between cellists (mostly) and the industry that transports them and their treasured instruments. Cellists have been bearing the brunt because their cargo is too precious to check as regular baggage but so large that it requires an extra cabin seat.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1985 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
CBS said Tuesday that its profits fell 22% in the second quarter ended June 30, compared to the same period a year ago. The company blamed the drop--to $69.3 million from $88.6 million--mostly on one-time items generated by two units whose long-term problems have been no secret: its toy and musical instruments divisions. But it reported a particularly strong quarter for its most important core business, the CBS broadcast group, which registered a 14% increase in earnings--to $181.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | GERI COOK
Hardly any of life's necessities are ever for sale in a pawnshop. When folks are in a bind for money, it's the luxu ries that go first--jewelry, stereos, TVs, cameras and musical instruments. With the onset of school, many students will be signing up for music classes. And, in many cases, Mom and Dad will have to come up with a good deal on a guitar, clarinet, flute or whatever. Used is the way to go.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2012 | By Marcia Adair
In the Paraguayan capital of Asuncion, there is a village called Cateura built practically on top of the city's main landfill.  Families eke out a living sorting through the trash and selling whatever valuables they can find.  Like many high poverty areas, drugs and gangs are rampant and children grow up with little hope of ever doing much more than sorting trash.   A trailer for a new documentary about Favio Chavez, a local ecologist and...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
The eccentric and compelling sculptures and wall reliefs of Swiss artist Valentin Carron take appropriation art in strange directions. Existing objects remain essentially intact, but the transformation in materials makes for surprising results. Carron's debut exhibition at David Kordansky Gallery includes musical instruments -- three trumpets, two saxophones, a couple of French horns and a clarinet -- that have been squashed flat and cast in bronze. The patina is a weird, sickly pink flesh-color; hanging on gallery walls, the reliefs have the look of flayed skin.
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