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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When you listen to Anacaona, the all-female, 12-member band from Cuba that favors a highly modernized version of salsa music, you might think you are listening to a new group. Yet Anacaona has 67 years of history behind it. The band, which will perform tonight at the Sportsmen's Lodge, was founded in 1932 by 11 sisters named Castro. Back then, the idea of a group made up exclusively of women was unheard of, even scandalous.
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NEWS
August 19, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only three weeks before the Latin Grammys are scheduled to make their Miami debut, a dispute over Cuban exiles voicing their anti-communist views is threatening to send the gala packing. A coalition of at least 60 Cuban American groups is demanding the right to demonstrate within view and earshot of the U.S. and foreign media that will converge on AmericanAirlines Arena on Sept. 11 to cover the show celebrating the best in Spanish-language music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The most unexpected breakout group in recent world music history has to be the Buena Vista Social Club. The group's Ry Cooder-produced album on Nonesuch has now hit the million mark in international sales--an amazing feat, given the fact that the ensemble consists of aging Cuban musicians almost completely unknown to audiences outside the island nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By many estimates, Juan Formell is the second-most famous man in Cuba, the first being what's-his-name with the beard. Formell is the leader of Los Van Van, Cuba's most popular dance band for the past 31 years. In Cuba, he has a big house and a maid. Everywhere else he goes, he is treated as royalty--except for Miami, where he is viewed by many as a court bard for Fidel Castro. His band is nominated for its first Grammy this year, in the salsa category, for "Llego Van Van . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By many estimates, Juan Formell is the second-most famous man in Cuba, the first being what's-his-name with the beard. Formell is the leader of Los Van Van, Cuba's most popular dance band for the past 31 years. In Cuba, he has a big house and a maid. Everywhere else he goes, he is treated as royalty--except for Miami, where he is viewed by many as a court bard for Fidel Castro. His band is nominated for its first Grammy this year, in the salsa category, for "Llego Van Van . . .
NEWS
August 19, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only three weeks before the Latin Grammys are scheduled to make their Miami debut, a dispute over Cuban exiles voicing their anti-communist views is threatening to send the gala packing. A coalition of at least 60 Cuban American groups is demanding the right to demonstrate within view and earshot of the U.S. and foreign media that will converge on AmericanAirlines Arena on Sept. 11 to cover the show celebrating the best in Spanish-language music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When you listen to Anacaona, the all-female, 12-member band from Cuba that favors a highly modernized version of salsa music, you might think you are listening to a new group. Yet Anacaona has 67 years of history behind it. The band, which will perform tonight at the Sportsmen's Lodge, was founded in 1932 by 11 sisters named Castro. Back then, the idea of a group made up exclusively of women was unheard of, even scandalous.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The most unexpected breakout group in recent world music history has to be the Buena Vista Social Club. The group's Ry Cooder-produced album on Nonesuch has now hit the million mark in international sales--an amazing feat, given the fact that the ensemble consists of aging Cuban musicians almost completely unknown to audiences outside the island nation.
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