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Muslim Women

OPINION
October 25, 2006 | Zaiba Malik, ZAIBA MALIK is a freelance writer and broadcaster in London.
There's a poster on the wall of an Islamic dress shop in East London showing a young woman in a black hijab. Above her is the word "Pure." The saleswoman who is helping me also has a scarf covering her head. I'm here to buy a hijab too -- but that's not all.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997
After reading "The Veil Returns in Surge of Tradition" (May 24), about the veil worn by some women in Muslim countries, I feel compelled to write a response. As an American Muslim woman I am becoming weary of seeing the same one-dimensional issue rehashed in the media. Yes, the veil is worn by some Muslim women, and if they alone choose to be attired so and they are happy with their own decision, then more power to them. Let it be known that the Saudi clerics are relying on their own male-oriented interpretation of what a woman should wear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1995 | DAVID E. BRADY
Two Cal State Northridge faculty members who attended last month's World Conference on Women will discuss their experiences on campus tonight, the university has announced. Political science professor Jane Bayes will speak about the official United Nations conference in Beijing, China, as well as an unofficial forum held in protest of a government ban. Mary Beth Welch-Orozco, the interim chairwoman of the CSUN women's studies department, will discuss human rights with a focus on lesbians.
WORLD
October 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Tony Blair said Tuesday that Islamic head scarves are a sign of separation and that Britain's Muslims should be encouraged to integrate with society to improve the quality of their lives. Blair's comments represented a strong stand in an emotional debate over assimilation, an issue that gained attention two weeks ago when former Foreign Secretary Jack Straw, now leader of the House of Commons, said Muslim women visiting his office should remove their veils.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | Associated Press
The city has agreed to pay $100,000 each to two Muslim women who were arrested for wearing religious veils in public. Najla E. Doran and Sherma D. Humphrey were charged with violating a state law prohibiting the wearing of masks in public. But people who wear masks for religious reasons are exempt under the law, which was aimed at Ku Klux Klan marchers. "We wish it had never happened," City Atty. Timothy Oksman said Thursday.
WORLD
November 22, 2002 | From Reuters
A conservative Australian politician has sparked outrage with a call to ban Muslim women from wearing the chador in public because they could be used to conceal weapons. In New South Wales' state parliament Wednesday, the Rev. Fred Nile said the chador was "a perfect disguise for terrorists, as it conceals both weapons and explosives." The Christian Democrat politician fueled the furor further today, telling local television: "It's only extremists who wear the chador."
NEWS
September 25, 2001 | Sandy Banks
It was intended as a simple gesture of solidarity with Muslim women who have become an easy target for our nation's anger these days: What if women from every race, religion and nationality went about their daily routines with their heads covered in the traditional scarves that many Muslim women wear? But when Washington, D.C., student Jennifer Schock posted her idea on the message board of a women's media group, she was stunned by the firestorm of controversy it generated.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Growing up in Cairo, Ola Hafez had wanted to wear the traditional veil. Her parents forbade it. "They wanted to make sure I understood the commitment I was making," she explained. Wearing a veil, they said, was not a rite of passage to be taken lightly only to be discarded later. So it wasn't until 15 years ago, when she was 20, that Hafez started wearing a veil as a way of maintaining the appropriate modesty prescribed by her religion and culture.
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