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NEWS
January 15, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his white beard and bare feet, Abu Bakar Bashir hardly looks the part of a wanted international terrorist. With students trailing behind, the 63-year-old Indonesian cleric ambled Monday across the grounds of the Islamic school he founded here 30 years ago. His large glasses and traditional white cap gave him the air of an aging owl. He laughed when he was shown a photo of himself in a Malaysian newspaper under the headline "On the Run." Officials in Singapore and Malaysia are not so amused.
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NEWS
February 16, 2002 | MARK FINEMAN and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From prayer groups to prison cells to this village of tin-roofed, clapboard houses, three Indonesian clerics pursued their vision of an Islamic state stretching across much of Southeast Asia. Operating from a secluded compound an hour from Malaysia's capital, Kuala Lumpur, they shuttled to other Islamic lands and fanned out across Malaysia, living on donations and urging the faithful to join a holy war to protect Islam.
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NEWS
March 13, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With her home destroyed and her church burned to the ground, 14-year-old Marina Rumakur knew there was only one way to survive: Convert to Islam and submit to a painful rite of mutilation. Trapped by Muslim extremists on the tiny Indonesian island of Kesui, she and more than 900 fellow Christians surrendered.
NEWS
January 15, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his white beard and bare feet, Abu Bakar Bashir hardly looks the part of a wanted international terrorist. With students trailing behind, the 63-year-old Indonesian cleric ambled Monday across the grounds of the Islamic school he founded here 30 years ago. His large glasses and traditional white cap gave him the air of an aging owl. He laughed when he was shown a photo of himself in a Malaysian newspaper under the headline "On the Run." Officials in Singapore and Malaysia are not so amused.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Rioters fired flaming arrows at mosques and churches and armed gangs blocked roads as clashes between Christian and Muslim militants spread in eastern Indonesia. At least 24 people have died this week and almost 3,000 have fled their homes in Maluku province, once known as the Spice Islands. At least 10 religious buildings were set afire and thousands of police and troops have been flown in to restore order.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Muslim fighters attacked a Christian village in eastern Indonesia, leaving at least 116 people dead in what Christians said was a massacre. Police said 108 Christians and eight Muslims died in the fighting Monday in the village of Duma, on Halmahera island about 1,600 miles northeast of Jakarta, the Indonesian capital. Church workers said that as many as 160 people, including 152 Christians and eight Muslims, were killed.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid promised that security forces will round up thousands of people who he says are responsible for the sectarian violence in the Molucca Islands that has killed scores of people in the past week. While gunfire and bomb blasts echoed across Ambon, the provincial capital, Wahid told visiting U.S. newspaper editors in Jakarta, the capital, that those detained would include "hooligans acting on behalf of Islam. . . . We will detain thousands."
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war ravaging the Maluku islands is one without heroes, only victims. It is a war in which neither side, Christian or Muslim, has political demands. Ideology is not an issue. Even the young men who fight are hard pressed to explain how or why it started, much less what they hope to accomplish besides revenge and survival. But what they do know is that this island chain long noted for its religious tolerance has changed, perhaps forever. For Indonesia, the implications are serious.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
At least 44 people were killed in an armed raid on a mostly Christian village in the eastern Indonesian province of North Molucca, an army chief said Tuesday. North Molucca military chief Lt. Col. Sukarwo said suspected Muslim militants attacked the village on Halmahera island before dawn Monday. The attack also injured at least 102 people, he said.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dewi Abriyani, a willowy 16-year-old with deep brown eyes, is a vision in flowing white when she sets off each morning for high school. Her floor-length robe is pristine and starched. So is a large head cover that fits snugly around her face and falls almost to her waist. "I wear Islamic dress not only because of religious obligation," explained the young Indonesian, referring to a 7th century dictate from the Koran. "It also makes me feel more comfortable, more beautiful.
NEWS
September 28, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned by mounting threats against Americans in Indonesia, the U.S. Embassy here said Thursday that it will begin withdrawing "nonemergency" employees and family members who wish to leave the country. In a strongly worded warning, the embassy urged other Americans to consider leaving and advised those who remain in Indonesia to "exercise maximum caution." Outside the U.S.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A Christian gang killed 18 Muslims, including women and children, outside a town on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi during religious clashes, police said. Fighting broke out early Tuesday between Muslim and Christian gangs near the town of Poso, with dozens of villagers injured and houses set ablaze, an officer at the military station in the town said. Police on Wednesday found 14 people hacked to death, many of them women and children. Later, local police Lt. Col.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With her home destroyed and her church burned to the ground, 14-year-old Marina Rumakur knew there was only one way to survive: Convert to Islam and submit to a painful rite of mutilation. Trapped by Muslim extremists on the tiny Indonesian island of Kesui, she and more than 900 fellow Christians surrendered.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dewi Abriyani, a willowy 16-year-old with deep brown eyes, is a vision in flowing white when she sets off each morning for high school. Her floor-length robe is pristine and starched. So is a large head cover that fits snugly around her face and falls almost to her waist. "I wear Islamic dress not only because of religious obligation," explained the young Indonesian, referring to a 7th century dictate from the Koran. "It also makes me feel more comfortable, more beautiful.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
Security forces battled independence activists armed with bows and arrows in Indonesia's remote Irian Jaya province, leaving at least 31 people dead, human rights workers said Saturday. John Rumbiak, a spokesman for the Irian Jaya-based Institute for Human Rights Study and Advocacy, said many of the victims were shot to death by police after a clash Friday.
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
The head of an Islamic university in restive Aceh province was shot to death Saturday, police said. Two unidentified men shot Safwan Idris, 51, in the neck at his home on the campus of the State Institute of Islamic Studies on the outskirts of the provincial capital, Banda Aceh, said Supt. Sayed Husaini. Safwan died at a hospital. The slaying brings to at least 120 the number of people killed in Aceh since a June 2 truce between separatist guerrillas and Indonesian troops.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | From Associated Press
In the worst outbreak of religious violence in Indonesia in decades, more than 320 people died this week in clashes between Christians and Muslims in the Spice Islands, officials said Thursday. Christian leaders renewed calls to the United Nations to send in peacekeepers to prevent a full-scale religious war, expressing fears that security forces will be unable to quell the escalating combat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1999 | Religion News Service
Villagers and police in Indonesia said this week that rioters burned down one of Southeast Asia's oldest churches in the recent wave of violent clashes between Muslims and Christians. Constructed in 1780 by Roman Catholic Portuguese colonizers, the Gereja Tua, or Old Church, was on Ambon Island, in the province of Maluku, 1,400 miles northeast of Jakarta. A Catholic priest was among at least eight people killed in the religious riot that erupted Jan. 21 in the twin villages of Hila-Kaitetu.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid promised that security forces will round up thousands of people who he says are responsible for the sectarian violence in the Molucca Islands that has killed scores of people in the past week. While gunfire and bomb blasts echoed across Ambon, the provincial capital, Wahid told visiting U.S. newspaper editors in Jakarta, the capital, that those detained would include "hooligans acting on behalf of Islam. . . . We will detain thousands."
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid formally declared a civil state of emergency in the Molucca Islands, saying fierce street fighting between Muslims and Christians had spiraled out of control. Wahid said he had assumed ultimate control of security in the islands, where scores have been killed in the past week. "The situation is out of control," he told reporters after a special meeting of key members of his Cabinet.
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