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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Southland Muslim and Jewish leaders decided Monday to restart a troubled interfaith dialogue group after Mideast tensions moved the Islamic side to freeze the effort last month. The group, launched in 1998 in what members hoped would become a national model for Muslim-Jewish relations, has lost members in the last several months as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict stoked emotions and suspicions on both sides.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2001 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were prayers and bowed declarations of God's greatness. Greetings of all-encompassing peace. The funeral procession and the handfuls of dirt that began to fill up the grave. Then the men left the dead to part with hard embraces and tears, and the women were given their opportunity to visit the grave, sitting and weeping on the gray soil.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1997 | JOHN DART
Spurred by Afghan immigrant families who wanted a place to teach youngsters their Muslim heritage, an emergent Islamic center has transformed a former church into an active worship and classroom complex in only four months. The worship hall now used as a mosque is still topped by a New England-style church steeple, but the pews have been removed for about 120 men and women who kneel on the carpeted floor during traditional mid-Friday prayers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2001 | DAVID PIERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A religious solidarity march in West Hills splintered into two groups Sunday afternoon after a handful of marchers refused to walk behind people carrying the Israeli flag. The event was organized by the San Fernando Valley Interfaith Council and members of Em Habanim Jewish temple, apparently with different goals in mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES
Marking the end of a three-year project, leaders of the Islamic Center of Northridge will dedicate the first private Islamic elementary school in the San Fernando Valley on Saturday. The Al-Falaq Academy in West Hills will teach Arabic and Koranic studies in addition to the basic curriculum required by California's Education Code. Leaders of the Northridge center estimate that about 6,000 Muslims live in the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1988 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
Mecca was three days of rapture for Mahasin Hasan-Salih, born in Los Angeles and raised a Catholic until she found Islam. She remembers her first moments in the Holy City, struggling to keep her feet in a swirl of more than a million pilgrims at the hajj , the yearly ritual where Muslims gather to follow in the footsteps of the Prophet Mohammed. Gazing about, she saw people of all colors, the men in white seamless garments and the women clad in formless outfits from foot to forehead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Leading Los Angeles Muslims and Jews agreed Thursday to move beyond national acrimony sparked by recent Jewish campaigns against public appointments of American Arabs and Muslims. Pledging to keep Los Angeles on the cutting edge of Muslim-Jewish relations, members of both groups agreed to renew efforts to forge a code of ethics to civilize debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992 | JOHN DART
San Fernando Valley Muslims began abstaining from food and drink during the daytime hours Thursday, the first day of Islam's holiest month, Ramadan. Taped messages left on several telephone lines of the Islamic Center of Northridge, the largest Muslim center in the Valley, informed callers that the 29- or 30-day period had started at daybreak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It seemed innocuous enough: a code of ethics to avoid stereotypes, repudiate violence and govern debate between Muslims and Jews in Southern California. But when two leading Muslim officials--Maher Hathout and Salam Al-Marayati--proposed the code last year, their involvement became a lightning rod for attacks by major Jewish organizations, which argued that the men actually condoned terrorism.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Southern California Muslims on Wednesday decried suggestions that EgyptAir pilot Gamil Batouty could have taken the jetliner down in a suicide mission, saying they fuel inflammatory stereotypes of Islamic fanaticism. "The subtle tone that this is another fanatical Muslim who invoked a prayer and crashed a plane . . . is very unfair," said Maher Hathout, the Egyptian-born spokesman for the Muslim Public Affairs Council in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Southland Muslim and Jewish leaders decided Monday to restart a troubled interfaith dialogue group after Mideast tensions moved the Islamic side to freeze the effort last month. The group, launched in 1998 in what members hoped would become a national model for Muslim-Jewish relations, has lost members in the last several months as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict stoked emotions and suspicions on both sides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
A landmark Muslim-Jewish dialogue group in Los Angeles has stopped meeting after Islamic leaders requested a freeze amid outrage in their community over Israeli behavior in the Mideast. Muslims complained that they felt they were expected to pass a litmus test of condemning Palestinian violence without Jews doing the same for Israeli excesses.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a heartfelt letter to his congregation at Temple Israel of Hollywood, Rabbi John L. Rosove described the first stage of the breakdown. One of the members of the Jewish Muslim peacemakers group he belongs to had just resigned. He spoke of being deeply disappointed about prospects for peace in the Middle East and recognized that many in his congregation felt the same way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key supporter of Rep. James E. Rogan (R-Glendale) on Wednesday sharply criticized the manager of his reelection campaign for saying a Los Angeles Muslim community leader "seems to be an apologist for Muslim terrorists." Irshad Ul-Haque, who has raised campaign money for Rogan, said it was "mind-boggling" that the congressman's campaign manager, Jason Roe, made the remark about Salam Al-Marayati, the executive director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The manager of Rep. James Rogan's reelection campaign attacked his Democratic challenger, Adam Schiff, on Tuesday for attending a forum with a Los Angeles Muslim community leader, saying it "raised some questions about the associations he plans to keep" if elected to Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The manager of Rep. Jim Rogan's reelection campaign attacked Democratic challenger Adam Schiff on Tuesday for attending a forum with a Los Angeles Muslim community leader, saying it "raised some questions about the associations he plans to keep" if elected to Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The manager of Rep. James Rogan's reelection campaign attacked his Democratic challenger, Adam Schiff, on Tuesday for attending a forum with a Los Angeles Muslim community leader, saying it "raised some questions about the associations he plans to keep" if elected to Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the thousands they came, cutting through Wednesday morning's rush-hour traffic to converge on a former insurance building on Vermont Avenue that is now Southern California's largest Muslim mosque. The women were decked out in their finest saris and African gowns while the men wore knee-length silk shirts known as kurtas. The teen-agers in the crowd were dressed in today's hippest fashions. Children dozed in their parents arms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1999 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With slow, painstaking pen strokes, 20 Jewish and Muslim leaders Monday put their signatures on a document they hope will help bring their two communities closer together. The code of ethics calls for Muslim and Jewish leaders to meet regularly to talk over important issues and to immediately and publicly repudiate any group or institution that appeals to prejudice, hate or violence. Most of the Jewish leaders signing the code were liberal rabbis.
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