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Musso Frank Grill

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2011
The landscape of Hollywood Boulevard is constantly evolving. But one constant is Musso & Frank Grill at 6667 Hollywood Blvd. Named for the original owners, Joseph Musso and Frank Toulet, the grill opened in 1919 and is Hollywood's oldest restaurant. During the golden age of Hollywood, the restaurant attracted such writers as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Raymond Chandler, William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway. There's even a legend that silent film superstars Charlie Chaplin, Rudolph Valentino and Douglas Fairbanks raced horses down the boulevard and the losers picked up the tab at the restaurant.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
The parking lot behind Hollywood landmark restaurant Musso & Frank Grill was purchased by a Los Angeles developer who intends to build a mixed-use complex on the site. Champion Real Estate Co. bought the paved 1.1-acre site behind the Hollywood Boulevard restaurant and between Cherokee and Las Palmas avenues from Common Fund. The price was not disclosed, but Hollywood real estate experts familiar with the property valued it at nearly $10 million. Last year, Champion paid $20 million for a 2.76-acre property at the northeast corner of Highland and Selma avenues, which it also intends to develop.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Newly divorced from a studio executive, Edith Reich needed a job in the early 1960s. She found one, and her future, at Musso & Frank Grill, Hollywood's oldest restaurant. Hired as a cashier-hostess, she soon married Charles Carissimi, whose family had co-owned the establishment -- famous as a literary haunt -- since the 1920s. When he died in 1969, their marriage was 6 years old, the restaurant 50. She was 55 and spent much of the next four decades managing Musso & Frank, in turn becoming something of a Hollywood institution herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | By Charlie Amter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There are precious few bars in Los Angeles that are welcoming, upscale and have a legitimate claim on pre-1950s Hollywood drinking history. This weekend sees the return of a great one, the Writer's Room, a space that once belonged to the famed Musso & Frank Grill. In its early days it was referred to as the "back room," where writers such as Raymond Chandler and F. Scott Fitzgerald were rumored to toss back gimlets. "We want to bring the room back to life in a way that reflects the past, yet offers something new that inspires creative types living in L.A. now," said managing partner Abdi Manavi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2010 | By Carlos Valdez Lozano
Anyone who knows Hollywood knows Musso & Frank, where the stars of the motion picture industry's Golden Age often dined. Everyone came to Musso's: Charlie Chaplin, Greta Garbo, Humphrey Bogart and Marilyn Monroe. Even as the world outside its doors changed with the times, Musso's, which opened in 1919, embraced its old charms: steaks, chops and martinis served by waiters in red jackets to patrons in red leather booths. No one messed with the Musso mystique, because in a town where it's sometimes hard to tell the difference, this was the real deal.
MAGAZINE
April 28, 1996 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
Where to find the best Belgian waffle? A magnificent mole verde? To-die-for dim sum? Times restaurant reviewers Linda Burum, Michelle Huneven, Jonathan Gold, Max Jacobson and S. Irene Virbila give their favorite platters a spin. * A cross between a French cre^pe and an American pancake, the flannel cakes at 77-year-old Musso & Frank Grill were the brainchild of the grill's original (French) chef, Jean Rue. He's the one who named them because they were "thin as flannel."
MAGAZINE
June 22, 2003 | S. Irene Virbila
Hollywood's oldest restaurant, Musso & Frank Grill, is practically pickled in tobacco and booze from less temperate decades, when F. Scott Fitzgerald, Dashiell Hammett and other disaffected Hollywood writers made Musso's a home away from home. Some of the waiters look as if they go back that far; the youngsters are the ones who have been here only 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | By Charlie Amter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There are precious few bars in Los Angeles that are welcoming, upscale and have a legitimate claim on pre-1950s Hollywood drinking history. This weekend sees the return of a great one, the Writer's Room, a space that once belonged to the famed Musso & Frank Grill. In its early days it was referred to as the "back room," where writers such as Raymond Chandler and F. Scott Fitzgerald were rumored to toss back gimlets. "We want to bring the room back to life in a way that reflects the past, yet offers something new that inspires creative types living in L.A. now," said managing partner Abdi Manavi.
MAGAZINE
September 22, 1996 | Mary Melton
Why has Musso & Frank Grill, the Hollywood landmark opened in 1919, endured while Hollywood Boulevard itself has crumbled and occasionally collapsed around it? Looking for some answers, we caught up with Musso's peripatetic chef, Michel Bourger (from Paris, France, notes the menu helpfully), now in his 23rd year at the restaurant. Despite the language barrier, chef Bourger gamely unraveled the Musso mystique. Q. Musso & Frank prints a new menu every day. Why? A. Every day the menu changes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | Kathie Jenkins
You could easily have a love affair with any of these grills. Columbia Bar and Grill, 1448 N. Gower St., Hollywood. (213) 461-8800. Style: Eighties-style Musso wanna-be known more for who's eating than what's being eaten. Setting: Open, bright and airy. Recommended dishes: Crab cakes; veal chop; grilled free-range chicken. Cost per person: $15-$35. DC 3 at the Santa Monica Airport, 2800 Donald Douglas Loop N., Santa Monica. (213)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2011
The landscape of Hollywood Boulevard is constantly evolving. But one constant is Musso & Frank Grill at 6667 Hollywood Blvd. Named for the original owners, Joseph Musso and Frank Toulet, the grill opened in 1919 and is Hollywood's oldest restaurant. During the golden age of Hollywood, the restaurant attracted such writers as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Raymond Chandler, William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway. There's even a legend that silent film superstars Charlie Chaplin, Rudolph Valentino and Douglas Fairbanks raced horses down the boulevard and the losers picked up the tab at the restaurant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Newly divorced from a studio executive, Edith Reich needed a job in the early 1960s. She found one, and her future, at Musso & Frank Grill, Hollywood's oldest restaurant. Hired as a cashier-hostess, she soon married Charles Carissimi, whose family had co-owned the establishment -- famous as a literary haunt -- since the 1920s. When he died in 1969, their marriage was 6 years old, the restaurant 50. She was 55 and spent much of the next four decades managing Musso & Frank, in turn becoming something of a Hollywood institution herself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2010 | By Carlos Valdez Lozano
Anyone who knows Hollywood knows Musso & Frank, where the stars of the motion picture industry's Golden Age often dined. Everyone came to Musso's: Charlie Chaplin, Greta Garbo, Humphrey Bogart and Marilyn Monroe. Even as the world outside its doors changed with the times, Musso's, which opened in 1919, embraced its old charms: steaks, chops and martinis served by waiters in red jackets to patrons in red leather booths. No one messed with the Musso mystique, because in a town where it's sometimes hard to tell the difference, this was the real deal.
MAGAZINE
July 25, 2004 | MICHAEL T. JARVIS
Little has altered since Musso & Frank Grill opened its doors on Hollywood Boulevard in September of 1919. Office manager Frederica Kaye attributes it to an old house edict: Put the money in the bank and don't change a thing. Celebrities, players and Hollywood wannabes still fill the leather booths, counter space and spacious bar, but these days the wait staff--long considered grumpy by critics and fans alike--seems friendlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Unit 21-50 was 10-97 in Hollywood, going 10-7 for a lunchtime 11-98. Or, in the police radio lingo of the 1950s, "Dan Mathews" was arriving in town for a reunion luncheon with some of the gang from the old "Highway Patrol" TV series. Wearing a fedora and a gruff grin, reunion organizer Gary Goltz was the mirror image Thursday of the show's star, the late Broderick Crawford, as he climbed out of a replica 1955 Highway Patrol cruiser parked behind Musso & Frank Grill.
MAGAZINE
June 22, 2003 | S. Irene Virbila
Hollywood's oldest restaurant, Musso & Frank Grill, is practically pickled in tobacco and booze from less temperate decades, when F. Scott Fitzgerald, Dashiell Hammett and other disaffected Hollywood writers made Musso's a home away from home. Some of the waiters look as if they go back that far; the youngsters are the ones who have been here only 30 years.
MAGAZINE
August 22, 1993 | Ruth Reichl
How bad are you feeling? Want to feel worse? In that case, read Joan Didion's July piece in the New Yorker and find out what a morally bankrupt society you've been living in. Now that the good times in Southern California are over, she says, we've discovered that our children are vapid and our houses are worthless. Worse, when we go out to celebrate the American Way, we do it with dinner at McDonald's.
MAGAZINE
February 11, 1996
The way to enter Hollywood's oldest restaurant, The Musso & Frank Grill, is through the back door. That's right, past the huge kitchen and its roaring stoves, past a room where red-jacketed waiters file by with their trays and a woman checks off each item one by one, down a hallway lined with portraits of the restaurant's founders and Jean Roux, its first chef.
MAGAZINE
February 6, 2000 | Tom Nolan
It happened one night in the parking lot of Musso & Frank in the superficial 1970s, but it seemed like a flashback to the glamorous '40s. An aging Rita Hayworth, wearing a shimmering gown and a glistening fur, looking every inch a legend, flanked by a trio of youngish men in tuxedos, stood fixed for a few slow-moving instants in the headlights of a turning car. Rather than shield herself from the intrusive glare, she smiled into it.
MAGAZINE
September 22, 1996 | Mary Melton
Why has Musso & Frank Grill, the Hollywood landmark opened in 1919, endured while Hollywood Boulevard itself has crumbled and occasionally collapsed around it? Looking for some answers, we caught up with Musso's peripatetic chef, Michel Bourger (from Paris, France, notes the menu helpfully), now in his 23rd year at the restaurant. Despite the language barrier, chef Bourger gamely unraveled the Musso mystique. Q. Musso & Frank prints a new menu every day. Why? A. Every day the menu changes.
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