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Mutual Aid

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2009 | Tony Perry
California's once-acclaimed mutual aid system among local fire departments, key to fighting the state's increasing number of massive brush fires, is being undercut by tight budgets, fire officials warned a legislative hearing Wednesday. Mutual aid response to the Station fire, the largest fire in Los Angeles County history, was down by a third over past Southland brush fires, officials told a session of the Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management. "We handled the Station fire because it was the only fire and was . . . not wind-driven," said Sheldon Gilbert, Alameda County fire chief and president of the California Fire Chiefs Assn.
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OPINION
July 6, 2012
In tight financial times, many cities save money by outsourcing municipal services such as clerical work to private companies. But there is no service more central to government and the people it serves than public safety, which should remain the responsibility of public agencies. The case of a fired lifeguard in Florida shows why. Beachgoers brought lifeguard Tomas Lopez's attention to a man floundering in shallow water. He raced to the scene; by then, the man had been pulled to the beach but had water in his lungs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1987 | Associated Press
The Board of Supervisors has approved a mutual aid agreement to help speed lifeguards to the scene of trouble. The agreement approved Tuesday orders city, county and state rescue teams to respond automatically to emergencies outside their jurisdictions when such aid is requested. "This thing needed to be done so badly," said Chris Brewster, spokesman for the San Diego Lifesaving Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2009 | Tony Perry
California's once-acclaimed mutual aid system among local fire departments, key to fighting the state's increasing number of massive brush fires, is being undercut by tight budgets, fire officials warned a legislative hearing Wednesday. Mutual aid response to the Station fire, the largest fire in Los Angeles County history, was down by a third over past Southland brush fires, officials told a session of the Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management. "We handled the Station fire because it was the only fire and was . . . not wind-driven," said Sheldon Gilbert, Alameda County fire chief and president of the California Fire Chiefs Assn.
NEWS
January 9, 1996 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nine cops in a rock 'n' roll band? Nine cops in uniform in a rock 'n' roll band? If the idea catches you off guard, or even amuses you, they don't mind. Mutual Aid--whose members are Southern California police officers from Santa Ana, Los Angeles, Monterey Park and elsewhere--is based on a simple premise: If kids see cops booming on drums and guitars, kids will think cops are cool. It's hard to measure the band's success by record sales--it hasn't cut one. At least yet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Evan Halper
The state's budget crunch so far has not appeared to affect firefighters' ability to battle the Southern California blazes. This year's firefighting efforts, however, could exacerbate the state's lingering financial problems, increasing the size of the deficit that lawmakers will have to close next year. A $182-million emergency fund the governor created for fighting wildfires was already half-depleted on Aug. 24 -- the last time officials tallied the numbers -- with more than 10 months left in the fiscal year and what is typically the worst of fire season yet to arrive.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2005 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Weeks before the first picket signs went up in Southern California's bitter supermarket labor dispute, grocery chains were designing a mutual aid pact to ensure that no chain could profit at the expense of another as they battled the union, court documents unsealed Friday showed. The long strike and lockout, which ended a year ago, pitted the United Food and Commercial Workers union against Safeway Inc., which owns Vons and Pavilions; Kroger Co., the parent of Ralphs; and Albertsons Inc.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1992 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission strongly urged telephone industry representatives on Tuesday to establish a formal means for assisting each other in quickly restoring telephone service during inadvertent disruptions. FCC Chairman Alfred C. Sikes told members of the FCC's Network Reliability Council that "a mutual aid and restoration" pact among telephone service providers "needs your careful consideration and concrete results."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1994
My sunburn-sensitive skin really gets chapped once again when our local government officials and press exclude their lifeguards for appreciation after natural disasters such as the recent California wildfires. Our beach communities need to think and remember: police, fire and lifeguards! My hat is off to all the fire departments, police and public safety men and women who courageously put their lives on the line to protect life and property during the fires. The mutual aid effort was an incredible logistic challenge tapping all available resources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Westminster and the Orange County Sheriff's Department have agreed to split a $327,000 overtime bill for deputies who helped control protests last year in Little Saigon after a store owner raised the Vietnamese flag and posted a picture of Communist leader Ho Chi Minh. Sheriff Mike Carona's decision to bill Westminster angered city officials because they thought it violated "mutual aid" protocol. City officials said that according to Orange County Chiefs of Police and Sheriff's Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Evan Halper
The state's budget crunch so far has not appeared to affect firefighters' ability to battle the Southern California blazes. This year's firefighting efforts, however, could exacerbate the state's lingering financial problems, increasing the size of the deficit that lawmakers will have to close next year. A $182-million emergency fund the governor created for fighting wildfires was already half-depleted on Aug. 24 -- the last time officials tallied the numbers -- with more than 10 months left in the fiscal year and what is typically the worst of fire season yet to arrive.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2005 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Weeks before the first picket signs went up in Southern California's bitter supermarket labor dispute, grocery chains were designing a mutual aid pact to ensure that no chain could profit at the expense of another as they battled the union, court documents unsealed Friday showed. The long strike and lockout, which ended a year ago, pitted the United Food and Commercial Workers union against Safeway Inc., which owns Vons and Pavilions; Kroger Co., the parent of Ralphs; and Albertsons Inc.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Albertsons Inc., Safeway Inc. and Kroger Co. must disclose terms of a mutual-aid agreement used during the 141-day strike and lockout at Southern and Central California stores last year, U.S. District Judge George King in Los Angeles ruled. King allowed the supermarkets -- Albertsons, Safeway's Vons and Pavilions stores and Kroger's Ralphs -- to keep the agreement confidential until Feb. 4 to give them time to appeal.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2004 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
California's attorney general said Friday that he planned to sue the grocery chains involved in the state's supermarket strike and lockout, alleging that their controversial mutual-aid pact violates federal antitrust laws. The pact, whereby the stores agreed to share an undisclosed amount of cash to help each of them during the dispute, "hurts consumers by discouraging competitive pricing" between the chains, Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer said in a statement.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2003 | James F. Peltz and Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writers
The three chains in the supermarket dispute held last-minute talks Monday with the state attorney general over his demand that they surrender a copy of their controversial mutual-aid pact. Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer, citing potential antitrust violations, subpoenaed Safeway Inc., Kroger Co. and Albertsons Inc. on Dec. 1, asking them to produce the agreement by the close of business Monday.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2003 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
A union-backed consumer lawsuit filed Thursday against the three supermarket chains in the 6-week-old strike and lockout alleges that the chains' unusual mutual-aid pact violates California antitrust law. The suit casts a spotlight on a key element of the labor dispute that has seldom been mentioned since the strike began Oct. 11 and that executives at the grocery stores -- Kroger Co.'s Ralphs, Albertsons Inc. and Safeway Inc.'s Vons and Pavilions -- refuse to discuss publicly in any detail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1997 | CARLOS V. LOZANO
Splitting up Ventura County's 805 area code would hamper long-established communications with fire and law enforcement agencies in neighboring Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties and should be avoided, officials say. Because of growing demand on the existing system, the California Public Utilities Commission is considering dividing the current 805 service area, which includes the three counties. The area code also includes portions of Los Angeles and Kern counties. The commission, working with the telecommunications industry, is considering four proposals to split the area code.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1991
The Soviet plea for economic aid as detailed in "Gorbachev Plea May Sway Bush to Help" (May 26) cannot be ignored. The Soviet economy is a shambles despite all attempts at reform; the transition to a free-market economy and to further democratization can't continue while the economy is so weak. Helping Gorbachev change both his country's economic and political systems can only serve to benefit the United States and the world. Decades of communist rule have destroyed Soviet economics.
OPINION
November 17, 2002 | Benjamin R. Barber, Benjamin R. Barber, Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland, is the author of "Jihad vs. McWorld." He will be speaking at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
Osama bin Laden, it appears, is back. Which means even after Iraq is disarmed, which it will certainly be one way or another, Al Qaeda will continue its campaign of destruction and terror. As the United States impatiently waits for weapons inspections to fail so it can open a second front in the war on terrorism, it has nowhere near closed out the first front. The Taliban has been run out, but Afghanistan is by no means stable. Pakistan has become a principal U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Westminster and the Orange County Sheriff's Department have agreed to split a $327,000 overtime bill for deputies who helped control protests last year in Little Saigon after a store owner raised the Vietnamese flag and posted a picture of Communist leader Ho Chi Minh. Sheriff Mike Carona's decision to bill Westminster angered city officials because they thought it violated "mutual aid" protocol. City officials said that according to Orange County Chiefs of Police and Sheriff's Assn.
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