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January 14, 1990 | From United Press International
The government announced Saturday that it has appointed a three-member team of legal veterans to head the prosecution of the federal drug-trafficking case against former Panamanian leader Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. U.S. Atty. Dexter Lehtinen told reporters he will not personally prosecute the case, which is expected to take 18 months to prepare and at least two months to try. Leading the prosecution will be Asst. U.S. Atty.
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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From United Press International
The government announced Saturday that it has appointed a three-member team of legal veterans to head the prosecution of the federal drug-trafficking case against former Panamanian leader Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. U.S. Atty. Dexter Lehtinen told reporters he will not personally prosecute the case, which is expected to take 18 months to prepare and at least two months to try. Leading the prosecution will be Asst. U.S. Atty.
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NEWS
August 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A lawyer and co-defendant of Manuel A. Noriega told a trial judge in Miami that he will plead guilty and testify against the former Panamanian leader. Ricardo Bilonick will give "significant testimony" against Noriega, Assistant U.S. Atty. Myles Malman told U.S. District Judge William M. Hoeveler. Bilonick is charged in a 1988 indictment with racketeering conspiracy, conspiracy to manufacture, import and distribute cocaine and importing more than a ton of it.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Tuesday ordered a psychiatric evaluation and continued detention for a podiatrist accused of plotting to blow up mosques across Florida. Robert Goldstein, 37, was silent and appeared disoriented during his bond hearing before U.S. District Judge Thomas McCoun III. Goldstein is charged with possessing a non-registered destructive device and attempting to use an explosive to damage Islamic centers. The explosives were found in his townhouse in the St. Petersburg suburb of Seminole.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2003 | From Reuters
A Florida doctor was sentenced to 12 1/2 years in federal prison Thursday for plotting to blow up an Islamic center in retaliation for the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States. Robert Goldstein, a 38-year-old podiatrist, apologized to the Islamic community before he was given the maximum sentence for conspiracy to violate civil rights, attempting to damage religious property and possessing unregistered firearms. "I am truly sorry for my irresponsible behavior.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors Tuesday offered their first testimony that Manuel A. Noriega accepted profits from illicit drug sales directly from the hands of one of his trusted military aides. The testimony of Lt. Col. Luis A. del Cid, a former Noriega confidant in the Panamanian Defense Forces, came just before the close of court on the second day of the government's conspiracy, racketeering and drug-smuggling case against the deposed Panamanian strongman.
NEWS
March 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
The CIA and the Medellin cocaine cartel helped finance the successful 1984 campaign of a former Panamanian president, according to transcripts released in Manuel A. Noriega's drug trafficking trial. The judge and attorneys discussed the issue earlier in the trial during closed-door conferences. Transcripts of those sessions are censored by the U.S. Justice Department security office before becoming public.
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega violated U.S. laws by putting "tons and tons of a deadly white powder" on American streets, a federal prosecutor told jurors Tuesday as Noriega's racketeering and cocaine-smuggling trial neared an end. In a four-hour closing argument, Assistant U.S. Atty. Myles Malman described the former strongman as "a corrupt, crooked and rotten cop" who protected U.S.-bound drug shipments from Colombia in exchange for "millions and millions of dollars in cash."
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A onetime Panamanian ambassador to Washington confirmed Wednesday that he is prepared to testify that Gen. Manuel A. Noriega took $10 million in payoffs from the Medellin drug cartel to protect at least 15 tons of cocaine bound for the United States. Ricardo Bilonick, 44, appeared in U.S. District Court here to enter a guilty plea to one charge of racketeering conspiracy.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A one-time trusted aide of Manuel A. Noriega testified Monday that the former military leader directed him to deliver bulky envelopes stuffed with drug money to Noriega's headquarters in Panama City. The statement by former Lt. Col. Luis A. del Cid came as the U.S. government presented a second week of testimony in federal court in support of 10 charges that Noriega accepted millions of dollars in payoffs to provide a safe haven for Colombian cocaine traffickers.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, U.S. District Judge William M. Hoeveler on Wednesday ordered the drug-trafficking and money-laundering trial of deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega and a raft of co-defendants to begin the week of March 5, but he left open the possibility of postponements. Hoeveler fixed the trial date after attorneys for Lt. Col. Luis A.
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