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NEWS
February 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Myrlie Evers-Williams, who is credited with leading the NAACP back from the brink of insolvency, said that she plans to step down as chairman of the board of the nation's oldest and largest civil rights group. Evers-Williams, 64, who has chaired the NAACP's board for the last three years, said she plans to remain a member of the board for at least another year but wants to focus on writing a book and establishing an independent civil rights think tank.
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NEWS
February 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Myrlie Evers-Williams, who is credited with leading the NAACP back from the brink of insolvency, said that she plans to step down as chairman of the board of the nation's oldest and largest civil rights group. Evers-Williams, 64, who has chaired the NAACP's board for the last three years, said she plans to remain a member of the board for at least another year but wants to focus on writing a book and establishing an independent civil rights think tank.
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NEWS
February 20, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Myrlie Evers-Williams, getting elected as chairwoman of the NAACP was the easy part. Now she has to heal divisions that have nearly torn the venerable civil rights organization apart, hire an executive director who can broaden its membership, drive it back onto the main roads of national political debates and--perhaps most challenging of all--erase its estimated $4-million debt. On her first full day in her new position, she made a start at all four.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1996 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairwoman of the NAACP told a crowd of more than 400 at Chapman University on Tuesday night that the work of the civil rights movement is not finished, especially in California. "America is at the crossroads," Myrlie Evers-Williams, 63, said. "America is not exactly sure what it is and what it should be doing. . . . We have become a little battle fatigued and stepped on the sidelines and said, 'OK, everything is OK.' Wrong."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1996 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairwoman of the NAACP told a crowd of more than 400 at Chapman University on Tuesday night that the work of the civil rights movement is not finished, especially in California. "America is at the crossroads," Myrlie Evers-Williams, 63, said. "America is not exactly sure what it is and what it should be doing. . . . We have become a little battle fatigued and stepped on the sidelines and said, 'OK, everything is OK.' Wrong."
MAGAZINE
June 25, 1995 | Sam Fulwood III, Sam Fulwood III is a staff writer in The Times' Washington Bureau. His last article for the magazine was about African American intellectuals
Every June 12 for the past 32 years, Myrlie Evers-Williams has been unable to escape grief. Last year was no different. Early in the morning, she and her second husband, Walter Williams, along with an old friend and fellow NAACP board member, Joe Madison, left downtown Washington for the 20-minute ride to Arlington National Cemetery. June 12 is the anniversary of the murder of Evers-Williams first husband--Medgar Evers.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to put a yearlong series of internal disputes behind it, the NAACP on Saturday ousted William F. Gibson, the strong-willed chairman who has led the civil rights organization since 1985, and chose Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers, as his replacement. "It is time to heal our wounds," Evers-Williams said in an emotional victory speech shortly after the NAACP board of directors elected her by a 30-29 vote. "We will move forward because we are family."
MAGAZINE
June 25, 1995 | Sam Fulwood III, Sam Fulwood III is a staff writer in The Times' Washington Bureau. His last article for the magazine was about African American intellectuals
Every June 12 for the past 32 years, Myrlie Evers-Williams has been unable to escape grief. Last year was no different. Early in the morning, she and her second husband, Walter Williams, along with an old friend and fellow NAACP board member, Joe Madison, left downtown Washington for the 20-minute ride to Arlington National Cemetery. June 12 is the anniversary of the murder of Evers-Williams first husband--Medgar Evers.
NEWS
February 20, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Myrlie Evers-Williams, getting elected as chairwoman of the NAACP was the easy part. Now she has to heal divisions that have nearly torn the venerable civil rights organization apart, hire an executive director who can broaden its membership, drive it back onto the main roads of national political debates and--perhaps most challenging of all--erase its estimated $4-million debt. On her first full day in her new position, she made a start at all four.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to put a yearlong series of internal disputes behind it, the NAACP on Saturday ousted William F. Gibson, the strong-willed chairman who has led the civil rights organization since 1985, and chose Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers, as his replacement. "It is time to heal our wounds," Evers-Williams said in an emotional victory speech shortly after the NAACP board of directors elected her by a 30-29 vote. "We will move forward because we are family."
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