Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMysteries
IN THE NEWS

Mysteries

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1988 | PATT MORRISON and ANN WIENER, Times Staff Writers
They arose early and got themselves all decked out: she in a midcalf dress of some soft beige, he in a jacket and tie--the first tie Scott Roston's roommate had ever seen him wear. Scott Roston and Karen Waltz raced to Las Vegas on Feb. 4 in his leased red Toyota two-seater and were wed in a $25 civil ceremony in a marriage commissioner's office enlivened by some blue and white artificial flowers. Then they raced back to Santa Monica.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Naomi Hirahara's seventh novel, “Murder on Bamboo Lane” (Berkley: 304 pp, $7.99 paper), is something of a departure: the kick-off of a mystery series featuring rookie bicycle cop Ellie Rush. For the last decade, Hirahara has written mysteries about Mas Arai , a Japanese American gardener based in Southern California; she won an Edgar for “Snakeskin Shanisen,” which came out in 2007. But if Mas is a throwback to a different California -- reticent, aging, with roots in the state's tortured racial history -- Ellie is a detective of a different sort.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 6, 1997 | LARRY HARNISCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Light does not easily penetrate the clouded story of Betty Short, a 22-year-old unemployed cashier and waitress whose body was found cut in half and gruesomely mutilated 50 years ago this month in a vacant lot in Southwest Los Angeles. The unsolved killing remains Los Angeles' premier myth noir, a tale of a tragic beauty clad in black, prowling the night life, a cautionary fable that rings as true today as it did in 1947. The legend insists on a shadowed, epic tone.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
A rare occurrence in the earliest days of a pregnancy produces an unusual and mystifying outcome: Identical twin fetuses are conceived of the same meeting of egg and sperm. And despite their shared DNA, one of the twins has Down syndrome (the most common genetic cause of intellectual impairment), but the other does not. For those who labor to understand how 3 billion base pairs of DNA result in the complexity of a single human, it's difficult to discern what effect an extra chromosome has on gene expression across the genome: from individual to individual, there's just too much natural variation for comparisons between two people to reveal truths that apply to all. But these aborted identical twins -- one with an extra copy of chromosome 21 and the other without -- offered scientists a remarkable opportunity: given the twin fetuses' otherwise exact DNA match, how would this one difference translate across the genome?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mob-style rub-out of Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel 50 years ago today at the Beverly Hills mansion of his street-wise, auburn-haired mistress has endured as one of Los Angeles' most romanticized murder mysteries.
SPORTS
February 22, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
When it happened, more than 19 years ago, it was a shock. And, in a way, it's still a shock. Sonny Liston dead? How could it be? He was a mountain, a guy who had muscles in his ears. He had a left hook that could take down buildings. Before his two questionable performances against Cassius Clay-Muhammad Ali, he was generally perceived as indestructible.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The news accounts, now 70 years old, offer only fragments of the "ghastly drama" that surrounded the marriage of Mary Kenan Flagler Bingham, "the richest woman in America." She was the widow of Standard Oil co-founder Henry Flagler and her estate was worth between $60 million and $100 million. Her bridegroom was Judge Robert Worth Bingham, a Kentucky lawyer without independent means. Their wedding in 1916 made headlines, even in New York. And so did her mysterious death eight months later.
NEWS
February 24, 1992 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The death of Crystal Spencer has evolved into a bizarre mystery--a tangled web of rumors and botched evidence, lawsuits and personal obsession. Nearly four years ago, the 29-year-old topless dancer was found dead in her disheveled Burbank apartment. She was half-nude, her body decomposed beyond recognition. Her telephone was off the hook. Whether she was murdered, or merely died of a sudden illness, is a lingering question.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | LAURA WILKINSON, Associated Press
The tearful and tearless both cry on William Frey's shoulder. Among those seeking his help since he published "Crying: The Mystery of Tears" three years ago were a woman whose husband alternated bouts of tears and laughter, and a restaurateur whose cooks cried chopping onions. For the restaurant owner, the answer was easy and time-honored: Chop the onions under a mist of water. Other times, it's more complicated.
NEWS
April 30, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding the most sensational medical investigation in local history, the Riverside County coroner's office announced Friday that Gloria Ramirez died of kidney failure as a result of cervical cancer--and the fumes that sickened the emergency room staff tending her probably were simply the smell of death.
SCIENCE
April 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
The moons that orbit Saturn may be increasing by one -- an icy, pint-sized object that astronomers have named “Peggy.” NASA's Cassini spacecraft has spotted evidence that a mysterious object measuring perhaps half a mile across is disturbing the outer edge of Saturn's large, bright A ring. The object's gravity seems to have roughed up the ring's usually smooth profile. PHOTOS: Amazing close-ups of moons As a result, a stretch of the A ring that measures 750 miles long and 6 miles wide is now about 20% brighter than it would typically appear.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
This summer, actor David Suchet will complete a task 25 years in the making when the final adaptations of Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot mysteries are aired. However, if fans want to see Poirot's final three adventures, they'll need a good broadband Internet connection. The English actor Suchet has been playing Christie's Belgian detective creation in a series of adaptations of all 70 of her Poirot stories since 1989. This summer, the 13th series of adaptations, made up of five TV movies, will debut in America, but not all episodes will air on PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery," which has been the show's stateside home for most of its run. The first two films, "The Big Four" and "Dead Man's Folly," will air on PBS on July 27 and Aug.  3, respectively.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | By Chris Megerian, Melanie Mason and Hailey Branson-Potts
ORLAND, Calif. -- Investigators probing the collision of a FedEx freight truck and a charter bus that killed 10 were dealing with disparate clues, including reports that the truck was on fire before the crash as well as evidence that its driver appeared not to brake. A woman who said the truck sideswiped her car moments before Thursday evening's fatal accident said she saw flames coming from beneath the twin-trailer vehicle as it veered across a grassy median toward disaster. A man who lives next to Interstate 5, however, said he saw no flames from the truck before the crash as he watched it swerve out of control after it made an abortive attempt to move into freeway's fast lane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Some residents in Long Beach and the north Orange County coast reported feeling and hearing what some thought was an earthquake Wednesday afternoon. But Caltech seismologist Kate Hutton said no earthquakes were reported in the area during the time the shaking was reported. “It's not an earthquake. It's probably an offshore sonic boom,” Hutton said. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said any sonic boom would come from a military aircraft.
FOOD
April 5, 2014 | Rick Rojas
In an industrial corridor outside Palm Springs, silent and still after most everyone had fled with the sunset, Grant Calkins and his wife, Janna, crept into a warehouse. They peered around, wondering if they were in the right place. Grant had stumbled upon the website of an underground supper club, and, intrigued by photos of the group's previous gatherings, the couple paid nearly $100 each for seats at PS Underground's event. They had no inkling as to what or where they would be fed. They had received only a one-word clue: craft.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Call it a dark farce, human comedy or wartime satire. But however you slice it, the ill-conceived morality tale "A Farewell to Fools" is a bust. Set in the waning days of World War II, the movie involves a group of Romanian villagers attempting to trick the resident fool, Ipu (Gérard Depardieu in hyper-slob mode), into giving up his life in order to save theirs. Unfortunately, the script by Anusavan Salamanian, based on the novel by Titus Popovici (first filmed as 1972's "Then I Sentenced Them All to Death")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1992 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
The city is sprinkled with sites of the untimely deaths of the famous and the fated. From John Belushi to the Black Dahlia, Los Angeles has been the backdrop for many a notorious demise. Solved or unsolved, some murders and suicides become part of the cultural fabric, spawning books, movies and even sightseeing tours. Here is a look at episodes from the city's homicidal history. 1.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A Denver police officer turned up in Utah after his mysterious disappearance prompted a weeklong manhunt, and he told investigators Friday that financial and personal problems compelled him to abandon his patrol car and head west on a motorcycle. David Hayhurst, 39, who had gotten a new apartment and a job at an auto-body shop in Reno, Nev., said he decided to return home after reading a newspaper account of the manhunt and deciding: "I couldn't do this to all those good people in Denver.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Abele
With a title like "Hot Guys With Guns," actor turned writer-director Doug Spearman's niche comedy-mystery aimed at pop culture-savvy gays makes plain its intentions - titillation, tension and titters - and for the undiscerning, it's likely to deliver. After a chicly designed credit sequence that appealingly spoofs James Bond openings, we settle on caustically friendly exes Danny (a likable Marc Anthony Samuel), a sweet-faced out-of-work actor taking private eye classes, and Patrick/Pip (Brian McArdle)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Book 'Em Mysteries in South Pasadena will close its doors April 30 after 24 years in business. On Tuesday it began its going-out-of-business sale, marking down the remaining 7,000 books in stock. The furniture and fixtures are also for sale. Mary Riley and Barry Martin were married to other people when they teamed up to open the shop in 1990. After each of their spouses passed away, Riley and Martin became a couple themselves. They lived together for 15 years before getting married.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|