Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMysterious Stranger
IN THE NEWS

Mysterious Stranger

ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley
Some might think an Irish version of the quintessentially English "A Christmas Carol" a wee bit misguided, considering the fractious history between the two countries. However, in the spirit of the season, the folks at the Celtic Arts Center reach for -- and largely achieve -- cultural detente in "Christmas O'Carol," a distinctly Irish treatment of Dickens' beloved tale concluding tonight at the group's Valley Village enclave.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
First there is the face: Astonishing in its many guises, this is a visage simultaneously old and young, ecstatic and empty; one where a surprised look becomes a world of wisdom living within a sly, sweet smile. This is the face of Oguri, butoh master and L.A. jewel. That his body is also a pristine, pliant work of art makes an Oguri performance a profound journey unlike any other. And so it was Saturday at Venice's Electric Lodge, when the dancer presented "Caddy! Caddy! Caddy!"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2007 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Whatever your ultimate take is on Tracy Letts' "Bug," the 2004 off-Broadway hit now in its Los Angeles premiere at the Coast, you are certain to ponder the play long after the final curtain. Not for the squeamish, "Bug" is part sci-fi, part "Lower Depths," a grim, gritty, surprisingly funny portrait of paranoiac down-and-outers involved in what may or may not be a massive government conspiracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
You know something may be amiss when your host sounds slightly apologetic. Such is the case with "Me & Mrs. Jones," the latest installment of "Masterpiece Theatre." In his opening, Russell Baker invites viewers to relax and enjoy the two-hour program (which runs Sunday at 9 p.m. on KCET and KVCR) as sheer comic fairy tale even as it strains credulity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
As admirable and ambitious as the folks at PBS Masterpiece are -- four tales of Charles Dickens in three months! -- it seemed inevitable they would run out of steam. (Eight hours of "Little Dorrit" is a lot of "Little Dorrit," even when it's good,0,1364897.story.) And they have, ending the series with a 90-minute version of "The Old Curiosity Shop" that streamlines plot, character and tone to the point that you have to wonder why they bothered.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
In the film version of Frances Mayes' restoration drama "Under the Tuscan Sun," Diane Lane plays a version of the poet and professor also named Frances Mayes. Directed by Audrey Wells, who loosely based her screenplay on Mayes' book, the movie traces how Lane's Frances -- younger, thinner, blonder and now flying solo -- travels to Tuscany whereupon she instantly falls for a mysterious stranger with the headily romantic name of Bramasole. Reader, she bought Bramasole.
MAGAZINE
September 24, 1989 | PETER J. BOYER, Peter J. Boyer, a former Times reporter, is a contributing editor of Vanity Fair .
IT IS SUNDAY morning in the middle of nowhere--Bloomington, Ill., actually--and Steve Garvey has a little time to kill. He's sitting in his hotel room, talking about baseball, particularly about his swing. It wasn't so much a swing, really, as a ritual. He eagerly hops off the bed and offers a demonstration. Stepping to the imaginary plate, he raises his right hand to his invisible helmet and then tugs gently--almost daintily--at the front of his shirt as he settles into his batting stance.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|