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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By August Brown
When we interviewed M83's Anthony Gonzalez earlier this year, the French epic-electronica producer mentioned film work as a major new goal. Recounting a trip to Joshua Tree, he said: " You just drive for an hour, and it's like being in a sci-fi movie out there, which was perfect for the kind of music I make. " He can now check "sci-fi epic score-writing" off that list -- he's been tapped to compose original music for Tom Cruise's new thriller, "Oblivion. " The Playlist reports that the film's director, Joseph Kosinski, who previously helmed"Tron: Legacy"(which had an original score by another French electronica act, Daft Punk)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
First there is the face: Astonishing in its many guises, this is a visage simultaneously old and young, ecstatic and empty; one where a surprised look becomes a world of wisdom living within a sly, sweet smile. This is the face of Oguri, butoh master and L.A. jewel. That his body is also a pristine, pliant work of art makes an Oguri performance a profound journey unlike any other. And so it was Saturday at Venice's Electric Lodge, when the dancer presented "Caddy! Caddy! Caddy!"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2007 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Whatever your ultimate take is on Tracy Letts' "Bug," the 2004 off-Broadway hit now in its Los Angeles premiere at the Coast, you are certain to ponder the play long after the final curtain. Not for the squeamish, "Bug" is part sci-fi, part "Lower Depths," a grim, gritty, surprisingly funny portrait of paranoiac down-and-outers involved in what may or may not be a massive government conspiracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
In the film version of Frances Mayes' restoration drama "Under the Tuscan Sun," Diane Lane plays a version of the poet and professor also named Frances Mayes. Directed by Audrey Wells, who loosely based her screenplay on Mayes' book, the movie traces how Lane's Frances -- younger, thinner, blonder and now flying solo -- travels to Tuscany whereupon she instantly falls for a mysterious stranger with the headily romantic name of Bramasole. Reader, she bought Bramasole.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Laura Skandera Trombley, Special to Tribune newspapers
The Complete Short Stories Mark Twain Introduction by Adam Gopnik Everyman's Library: 716 pp., $28 Mark Twain was on the lecture circuit for over three decades. He would take the stage feigning bemusement at discovering his audience and stand silently smoking one of the 30 cigars he would enjoy that day. He was a solitary performer working in dusty, drafty, dimly lit halls, sans audio equipment, Twain knew every trick to keep his audiences engaged. His delivery, emotion, intelligence and humor would bring crowds to their feet.
BOOKS
January 23, 1994 | RICHARD EDER
The gospel according to Jose Saramago begins with the author contemplating a painting of the Crucifixion and, in a kind of mock gravity, subverting its iconography. Which of the figures is Mary Magdalene? Surely, the one with the plunging neckline; on the other hand, one woman is blond. There is, after all "the popular belief that women with blond hair, whether it be natural or dyed, are the most effective instruments of sin." Then there are the two thieves.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2012 | By Laura Skandera Trombley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Complete Short Stories Mark Twain Introduction by Adam Gopnik Everyman's Library: 716 pp., $28 Mark Twain was on the lecture circuit for over three decades. He would take the stage feigning bemusement at discovering his audience and stand silently smoking one of the 30 cigars he would enjoy that day. He was a solitary performer working in dusty, drafty, dimly lit halls, sans audio equipment, Twain knew every trick to keep his audiences engaged. His delivery, emotion, intelligence and humor would bring crowds to their feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Dinah Washington is better known for her sensational voice than she is for being the Rosa Parks of Las Vegas. But playwright Oliver Goldstick, in his semi-fictionalized play "Dinah Was" at the Coast Playhouse, has focused on Washington's 1959 foray into the good fight. The first black entertainer booked into the main room at the Sahara Hotel, Washington arrived triumphant only to be told there were no rooms available and to be given accommodations in a trailer out back, with the dog acts.
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