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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
You know something may be amiss when your host sounds slightly apologetic. Such is the case with "Me & Mrs. Jones," the latest installment of "Masterpiece Theatre." In his opening, Russell Baker invites viewers to relax and enjoy the two-hour program (which runs Sunday at 9 p.m. on KCET and KVCR) as sheer comic fairy tale even as it strains credulity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By August Brown
When we interviewed M83's Anthony Gonzalez earlier this year, the French epic-electronica producer mentioned film work as a major new goal. Recounting a trip to Joshua Tree, he said: " You just drive for an hour, and it's like being in a sci-fi movie out there, which was perfect for the kind of music I make. " He can now check "sci-fi epic score-writing" off that list -- he's been tapped to compose original music for Tom Cruise's new thriller, "Oblivion. " The Playlist reports that the film's director, Joseph Kosinski, who previously helmed"Tron: Legacy"(which had an original score by another French electronica act, Daft Punk)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
First there is the face: Astonishing in its many guises, this is a visage simultaneously old and young, ecstatic and empty; one where a surprised look becomes a world of wisdom living within a sly, sweet smile. This is the face of Oguri, butoh master and L.A. jewel. That his body is also a pristine, pliant work of art makes an Oguri performance a profound journey unlike any other. And so it was Saturday at Venice's Electric Lodge, when the dancer presented "Caddy! Caddy! Caddy!"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2012 | By Laura Skandera Trombley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Complete Short Stories Mark Twain Introduction by Adam Gopnik Everyman's Library: 716 pp., $28 Mark Twain was on the lecture circuit for over three decades. He would take the stage feigning bemusement at discovering his audience and stand silently smoking one of the 30 cigars he would enjoy that day. He was a solitary performer working in dusty, drafty, dimly lit halls, sans audio equipment, Twain knew every trick to keep his audiences engaged. His delivery, emotion, intelligence and humor would bring crowds to their feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
In the film version of Frances Mayes' restoration drama "Under the Tuscan Sun," Diane Lane plays a version of the poet and professor also named Frances Mayes. Directed by Audrey Wells, who loosely based her screenplay on Mayes' book, the movie traces how Lane's Frances -- younger, thinner, blonder and now flying solo -- travels to Tuscany whereupon she instantly falls for a mysterious stranger with the headily romantic name of Bramasole. Reader, she bought Bramasole.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Wide Sargasso Sea" is so soaked in atmosphere it feels practically marinated. A lush, feverish tropical concoction filled with vivid colors, pounding drums and passionate liaisons, this Caribbean melodrama gets so overheated it doesn't even notice that its dramatic plausibility has vaporized into the steamy air. Not that that matters very much. Though its based on a celebrated novel, winner of several of Britain's top literary prizes, the appeal of this film is primarily to the visual senses.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Czechoslovakian-born, English playwright Tom Stoppard practices his craft with a sense of humor honed by years of exposure to such British institutions as Beyond the Fringe and Monty Python's Flying Circus. Silliness, punning and a relatively high degree of literacy are important to such works as "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead," "Travesties" and the two one-act Stoppard plays presented this weekend by Cal Lutheran University, "The Real Inspector Hound" and "After Magritte."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
Banker Ed DeSure's colleagues told him he was crazy when, at the age of 72, he left a high-paying job to become a Peace Corps volunteer. "I told them, 'I'm a happier man than you are; I'm doing what I want to do,' " he recalled recently. DeSure was sent to Botswana, where he ran a trade school for that country's youth. Despite the hardships he faced in Africa, he said, he has never regretted his decision. "I have always been interested in helping youth," he said.
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