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Mysterious Stranger

ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By August Brown
When we interviewed M83's Anthony Gonzalez earlier this year, the French epic-electronica producer mentioned film work as a major new goal. Recounting a trip to Joshua Tree, he said: " You just drive for an hour, and it's like being in a sci-fi movie out there, which was perfect for the kind of music I make. " He can now check "sci-fi epic score-writing" off that list -- he's been tapped to compose original music for Tom Cruise's new thriller, "Oblivion. " The Playlist reports that the film's director, Joseph Kosinski, who previously helmed"Tron: Legacy"(which had an original score by another French electronica act, Daft Punk)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
First there is the face: Astonishing in its many guises, this is a visage simultaneously old and young, ecstatic and empty; one where a surprised look becomes a world of wisdom living within a sly, sweet smile. This is the face of Oguri, butoh master and L.A. jewel. That his body is also a pristine, pliant work of art makes an Oguri performance a profound journey unlike any other. And so it was Saturday at Venice's Electric Lodge, when the dancer presented "Caddy! Caddy! Caddy!"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2007 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Whatever your ultimate take is on Tracy Letts' "Bug," the 2004 off-Broadway hit now in its Los Angeles premiere at the Coast, you are certain to ponder the play long after the final curtain. Not for the squeamish, "Bug" is part sci-fi, part "Lower Depths," a grim, gritty, surprisingly funny portrait of paranoiac down-and-outers involved in what may or may not be a massive government conspiracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012
SERIES Kitchen Nightmares: In this new episode, Gordon Ramsay visits three California restaurants he helped turn around in the past: La Frite in Sherman Oaks, Kingston Cafe in Pasadena and Capri in Eagle Rock, along with the Spanish Pavilion in Harrison, N.J. Are they continuing to succeed, or have they reverted to their bad old ways? (8 p.m. Fox). SoCal Connected: This new installment examines efforts by the U.S. military to "go green" by finding alternative sources of fuel and energy (9 p.m. KCET)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
In the film version of Frances Mayes' restoration drama "Under the Tuscan Sun," Diane Lane plays a version of the poet and professor also named Frances Mayes. Directed by Audrey Wells, who loosely based her screenplay on Mayes' book, the movie traces how Lane's Frances -- younger, thinner, blonder and now flying solo -- travels to Tuscany whereupon she instantly falls for a mysterious stranger with the headily romantic name of Bramasole. Reader, she bought Bramasole.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the biggest tourist attractions in Santa Fe, N.M. is the "Miraculous Staircase" in the Loretto Chapel. More than 364,000 people flock yearly to see the circular structure, which was built by a mysterious stranger in 1878. An engineering and architectural wonder, the staircase was built without any nails or center support. It was made of a type of wood that is still of unknown origin but recently coined as "Loretto spruce" because no other classification exists.
BOOKS
June 19, 1988 | Janet Hadda, Hadda teaches Yiddish at UCLA and is a psychoanalyst. Her latest book is "Passionate Women, Passive Man: Suicide in Yiddish Literature" (SUNY Press). and
Fiction about the Holocaust provokes problematic questions for author and reader alike: What is the appropriate balance between imagination and fact? How can a subject so enormous and profound be captured in a single work of art? Who has the right to touch a realm that is ineffable to some who actually experienced it? Is it irresponsible--or even immoral--to derive enjoyment and aesthetic fulfillment from the contemplation of genocide?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
As admirable and ambitious as the folks at PBS Masterpiece are -- four tales of Charles Dickens in three months! -- it seemed inevitable they would run out of steam. (Eight hours of "Little Dorrit" is a lot of "Little Dorrit," even when it's good,0,1364897.story.) And they have, ending the series with a 90-minute version of "The Old Curiosity Shop" that streamlines plot, character and tone to the point that you have to wonder why they bothered.
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