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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By August Brown
When we interviewed M83's Anthony Gonzalez earlier this year, the French epic-electronica producer mentioned film work as a major new goal. Recounting a trip to Joshua Tree, he said: " You just drive for an hour, and it's like being in a sci-fi movie out there, which was perfect for the kind of music I make. " He can now check "sci-fi epic score-writing" off that list -- he's been tapped to compose original music for Tom Cruise's new thriller, "Oblivion. " The Playlist reports that the film's director, Joseph Kosinski, who previously helmed"Tron: Legacy"(which had an original score by another French electronica act, Daft Punk)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
First there is the face: Astonishing in its many guises, this is a visage simultaneously old and young, ecstatic and empty; one where a surprised look becomes a world of wisdom living within a sly, sweet smile. This is the face of Oguri, butoh master and L.A. jewel. That his body is also a pristine, pliant work of art makes an Oguri performance a profound journey unlike any other. And so it was Saturday at Venice's Electric Lodge, when the dancer presented "Caddy! Caddy! Caddy!"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2007 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Whatever your ultimate take is on Tracy Letts' "Bug," the 2004 off-Broadway hit now in its Los Angeles premiere at the Coast, you are certain to ponder the play long after the final curtain. Not for the squeamish, "Bug" is part sci-fi, part "Lower Depths," a grim, gritty, surprisingly funny portrait of paranoiac down-and-outers involved in what may or may not be a massive government conspiracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
In the film version of Frances Mayes' restoration drama "Under the Tuscan Sun," Diane Lane plays a version of the poet and professor also named Frances Mayes. Directed by Audrey Wells, who loosely based her screenplay on Mayes' book, the movie traces how Lane's Frances -- younger, thinner, blonder and now flying solo -- travels to Tuscany whereupon she instantly falls for a mysterious stranger with the headily romantic name of Bramasole. Reader, she bought Bramasole.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
As admirable and ambitious as the folks at PBS Masterpiece are -- four tales of Charles Dickens in three months! -- it seemed inevitable they would run out of steam. (Eight hours of "Little Dorrit" is a lot of "Little Dorrit," even when it's good,0,1364897.story.) And they have, ending the series with a 90-minute version of "The Old Curiosity Shop" that streamlines plot, character and tone to the point that you have to wonder why they bothered.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Mark Twain was not quite 50 when he published "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" in February 1885, and in so doing, changed American literature. Until then, many of our writers had flirted with vernacular expression, most notably Thomas Paine, whose "Common Sense," was written to appeal to (and to sway) the common man. To read Paine now, however, as well as other populists such as Thoreau and Whitman, is to confront a strange dichotomy between their democratic intentions and their elevated prose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
Banker Ed DeSure's colleagues told him he was crazy when, at the age of 72, he left a high-paying job to become a Peace Corps volunteer. "I told them, 'I'm a happier man than you are; I'm doing what I want to do,' " he recalled recently. DeSure was sent to Botswana, where he ran a trade school for that country's youth. Despite the hardships he faced in Africa, he said, he has never regretted his decision. "I have always been interested in helping youth," he said.
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