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HEALTH
May 16, 2011 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Whenever I hear about some amazing way to boost resting metabolism, my male-bovine-droppings detector goes berserk. Take the perennially popular one stating that 1 pound of muscle burns an extra 50 calories a day while at rest — so if you gain 10 pounds of muscle, your resting metabolic rate (RMR) soars by an extra 500 calories each day. Awesome! And also drivel. I'm more likely to believe bears use Porta-Potties and the pope is a Wiccan. Though its origins are uncertain, any number of fitness magazines have made the "50 calories per pound of muscle" statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Christopher Knight
Myths die hard. Especially creation myths. Messing with the symbolic origins of a world isn't something to be undertaken lightly. Jackson Pollock's mammoth 1943 painting "Mural" - nearly 8 feet high, 20 feet wide and covered edge-to-edge with rhythmic, Matisse-like linear arabesques, muscular abstract shapes and piercing voids, all of which he likened to a frenzied mustang stampede - was something entirely new for American art. The great painting represents...
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NATIONAL
February 17, 2014 | By David Horsey
Especially when it comes to economic policy, too many politicians are motivated by myths more than by facts. A prime example: the myth of the job creators. Republicans, such as Speaker of the House John Boehner, talk of job creators in reverent, worshipful terms. In their vision of how the world works, it is these brave titans of capitalism who, with no help from anyone else, build the companies that create jobs for American workers. To Boehner and his party, anything that inhibits job creators in their endeavors - taxes, environmental laws, financial regulations - is a job killer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Among the 25 or so awards to be handed out at Sunday's Oscars will be the prize for documentary short. One of the less recognized categories at the annual ceremony, the doc short field this year contains a certain newsworthiness because of the inclusion of one nominee, "The Lady in Number 6," about Alice-Herz Sommer, a pianist who was known for years as the oldest living Holocaust survivor. Herz-Sommer died several days ago at the age of 110, thrusting into the headlines a film and category few might have otherwise talked about.
OPINION
September 29, 2012
Re "What has Obama learned?," Opinion, Sept. 25 Jonah Goldberg asserts that President Obama was "easily among the least experienced major party nominees in U.S. history. " This assertion is dubious. Obama had more experience as an elected official before wining the presidency than many of his successful predecessors (nearly 11 years total - seven in the Illinois statehouse and almost four as a U.S. senator). Abraham Lincoln served eight years as an Illinois state representative and two years in the House before becoming president.
OPINION
December 14, 2006
Re "Holocaust deniers gather in Iran," Dec. 12 I'm not sure that Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad will be able to convincingly prove his contention that the Holocaust is a myth, but his conference has conclusively proved that any belief that anti-Semitism isn't more of a threat than ever before in the last 70 years is a myth. Hitler didn't host conferences with international attendance. RICHARD T. RASKIN Encino
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2003
Congratulations, Tim Rutten, on being able to regurgitate the handful of known (and notably some dead) Republicans in Hollywood ("Left-Leaning Hollywood: A Myth Dies," Aug. 23). Their names drift so easily to mind because they are/were oddities in the otherwise overwhelmingly liberal landscape of Tinseltown. Didn't you notice that your list spans about 60 years with a result of only about 10 Republicans? I suspect that if you were to start reeling off a similarly known list of vocal liberals who inhabit this industry today, it would far exceed The Times' allowable space for publication.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2007 | David Colker
The warning: When checking out of a hotel, never return the room key card! The myth: Computerized hotel key cards are routinely imprinted with guests' personal information, including names, addresses and credit card numbers. The truth: Hotel companies and law enforcement agencies have said repeatedly that such information isn't put on the cards. How it started: In 2003, a Pasadena police detective spread the warning without checking its veracity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1988
Another media-inspired myth about homosexuality. Cheryl Crane--a "model" lesbian--wants us to believe that 2 1/2 years of sexual abuse and murdering one of her mother's suitors due to his abusive treatment of her mother didn't have anything to do with her sexual preference. Give me a break. Crane cops to the ludicrous pro-gay tenet that homosexuality is innate and has nothing to do with one's early environment. Such a rationale is clearly self-protective. Crane needn't deal with her tragically acquired ambivalence toward men; mama Lana in turn is relieved of facing the horrific effects of her own sexual brokenness upon Crane.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Tuesday's tepid brew of jobs data , delayed more than two weeks by the government shutdown, wasn't worth waiting for. It shows an increase in total nonfarm employment by 148,000 in September over August, which is consistent with economic growth crawling along in second gear. The report's most notable nugget is the change in part-time work. Over the last month the number of workers in part-time jobs for economic reasons--slack demand, cutbacks in hours--has remained stable. Over the last year, however, it has fallen by 681,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
The little town of Dixon, Ill., has two claims to fame. First, it's the self-proclaimed Petunia Capital of Illinois. And second, it's the boyhood home of Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States. Presidents (and petunias) are no doubt good for tourism, which is probably why the town has decided to erect another bronze statue - its third - to Reagan. This one is planned for Lowell Park, just north of the Dixon Correctional Center, the state's largest medium security facility.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Karin Klein
It's been snowing in the Eastern United States like nobody's business. Crazy, wild cold and snowstorms. Predicting the weather might be hard, but predicting that extreme cold weather will produce a lot of hot air from climate deniers is easy. In fact, the number of myths floating around about climate change is pretty extensive, and I thought it might be helpful to address them, one by one, over the course of the year. For today, though, snow and cold are on people's minds. And that means plenty of people saying that this is strong evidence, if not downright proof, that the planet is not heating up. There's an elegant, if not complete, counterargument that comes via MIT's Knight Science Journalism Tracker, one of my favorite daily blog reads.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2014 | By David Horsey
Especially when it comes to economic policy, too many politicians are motivated by myths more than by facts. A prime example: the myth of the job creators. Republicans, such as Speaker of the House John Boehner, talk of job creators in reverent, worshipful terms. In their vision of how the world works, it is these brave titans of capitalism who, with no help from anyone else, build the companies that create jobs for American workers. To Boehner and his party, anything that inhibits job creators in their endeavors - taxes, environmental laws, financial regulations - is a job killer.
SPORTS
February 11, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
COLUMBIA, Mo. - Craig Kuligowski heard the words, but at first they didn't register. In nearly three decades in college football, the University of Missouri defensive line coach had come to view summer team-building sessions as a typically uneventful training camp exercise. So he wasn't expecting different on a sweltering day last August when he gathered 15 players in a nondescript, windowless meeting room on the first floor of the Mizzou Athletic Training Complex. There, beneath seven black-and-gold placards professing an adherence to teamwork, camaraderie and character, one of the players tested whether those were core values or just empty words.
OPINION
February 9, 2014
Re "The future of Keystone XL," Editorial, Feb. 2 TransCanada hasn't had a spill from our actual oil pipelines. The first Keystone pipeline has safely delivered more than 550 million barrels of oil to U.S. refineries. In 2011 we replaced some fittings at all of our pump stations after some releases occurred; there hasn't been an issue since. Most spills were just a few gallons, and most of the oil remained on our property and was cleaned up without an environmental impact The State Department's latest report reiterated that Keystone XL would be the safest pipeline ever built in the U.S. if TransCanada agreed to 59 additional conditions - and we have.
SPORTS
January 31, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
In a question and answer story from Soccernation.com, Vincent J. Stanley, a long-time coach, offers some interesting takes about youth sports. Are parents and coaches pushing their kids too hard? Should kids play only one sport? Is rest important? How do you avoid burnout? Here's the link to the answers and more provocative insights. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2004
Reed JOHNSON gets it right regarding Che Guevara and his false myth ["Heroes: Lionized, Supersized," Oct. 4]. While his beliefs were somewhat different from those of Osama bin Laden, both men caused a lot of harm and carried a lot of hate (Bin Laden still does). Like Bin Laden, Guevara was a savage ideologue for whom life was worth nothing if you were on the side of the "imperialists." Their methods are similar in that they both killed countless without legal process, all in the name of "revolutionary justice."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Californians are heading into an intense, critical debate over the level of public service they're willing to pay for. So it's time to puncture some myths. Everyone's entitled to his own opinion, as the late Daniel Patrick Moynihan used to say, but not his own facts. Voters owe it to themselves to separate myth from fact as they begin pondering Gov. Jerry Brown's planned November ballot initiative to temporarily raise about $7 billion annually from higher income taxes on the rich and sales taxes on everyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
The film “20,000 Days On Earth” is that rare thing, a movie that is hard to classify. Even describing it is difficult to do. Screening as part of the World Cinema Documentary Competition at Sundance, it is a document of the recording of Nick Cave's most recent album “Push the Sky Away,” an intimate look at his life, creative process and where his mind is at now, as well as a burnishment of his carefully crafted persona as lover man, wild...
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By David Lauter
How much of a boost did President  Obama's 2012 campaign really get from its much-vaunted mastery of data analysis? A significant amount, but not as much as some people think, according to a new analysis by two leading political scientists. The Obama campaign's data efforts have changed the nature of presidential campaigns, much as the “Moneyball” revolution taught some baseball teams that careful analysis of statistics could lead to a wiser use of resources than just going with the gut instincts of longtime scouts.
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