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Myth

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Californians are heading into an intense, critical debate over the level of public service they're willing to pay for. So it's time to puncture some myths. Everyone's entitled to his own opinion, as the late Daniel Patrick Moynihan used to say, but not his own facts. Voters owe it to themselves to separate myth from fact as they begin pondering Gov. Jerry Brown's planned November ballot initiative to temporarily raise about $7 billion annually from higher income taxes on the rich and sales taxes on everyone.
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SPORTS
March 25, 2011 | By Baxter Holmes
It was the first inning, one runner aboard, the count at two balls and two strikes, and Tom Lovrich stared down the 19-year-old rookie batter. USC's junior ace didn't know much about him, except that he more than filled out his gray New York Yankees uniform. "He was a strong, country kid from Oklahoma," Lovrich said, recalling the legendary at-bat that took place 60 years ago Saturday. "Very strong. " Lovrich figured the rookie would chase something low and away for strike three, so the 6-foot-5 right-hander known as "Tall Tom" began his sidearm windup and fired.
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Attention dieters: Many of the “facts” you think you know about obesity and weight loss are wrong. So says a report published in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. An international team of dietitians, doctors and other experts examined more than a dozen ideas about obesity that are widely believed to be true but aren't actually supported by reliable medical evidence. It's not just dieters who buy into these mistaken notions, the study authors note - much of this incorrect conventional wisdom is espoused by physicians, academic scientists, government agencies and (gulp)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Paula Woods
Over the course of nine novels, Scott Turow's Kindle County has become one the best-known settings in American literature. While fictional locations are not uncommon in the crime genre - the city of Santa Teresa in Ross Macdonald's and, later, Sue Grafton's mysteries comes most readily to mind - Turow's character-driven legal thrillers are more aligned with the artistic vision of William Faulkner, whose novels and short stories are set in Yoknapatawpha County,...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2011
Howard Cosell: The Man, the Myth, and the Transformation of American Sports Mark Ribowsky W.W. Norton: 512 pp., $29.95
NEWS
May 1, 1992
In response to "More Women, Less Money" (April 19): It is refreshing to have my experiences in the corporate world confirmed. Throughout my education from elementary school on up, we were taught a myth: Both sexes are equal. When I started work with a Fortune 500 company with "lots of opportunities," I continued to be frustrated with the reality of very unequal opportunities in the workplace for women. ANGELIQUE HAISMAN Rancho Cucamonga
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1991
There may be a truth about the Kennedy assassination that we don't know, but we sure don't get it from Stone. He has said that the core of his position is the Abraham Zapruder film of the shooting, which he claims proves that the shot to Kennedy's head had to come from the front. While it is true that the President's head and body did undulate backward, a close look at the film shows that blood and other matter from the head shot burst out forward . Anyone who has seen films or stroboscopic pictures of bullet hits know that matter is ejected not from entry holes, but from exit holes, moving in the same direction as the bullet.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
The annual report of the Social Security Trustees is the sort of rich compendium of facts and analysis that has something for everybody, like the Bible. In recent years, during which conservatives have intensified their efforts to destroy one of the few U.S. government programs that actually works as intended, the report's publication has become an occasion for hand-wringing and crocodile tears over the (supposedly) parlous state of the system's finances. This year's report, which came out Thursday, is no exception.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1986
It seems to bother Leonard Feather inordinately that Jelly Roll Morton has achieved the status of jazz giant ("10 Long-Playing Myths Versus the Facts," Aug. 3). Feather's justification for debunking Myth No. 6--"The first great jazz composer-arranger was Jelly Roll Morton"--degenerates into a personal diatribe against the artist and a eulogy for Don Redman. Jelly Roll Morton died in 1941, so it is impossible to compare his accomplishments with Redman's after that date. Before then, and especially in the 1920s, I think Morton's compositions were more distinguished and his arrangements swung much more than Redman's.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1989
Several letters in the June 10 Calendar section denounce the act Les Mormons. Unlike those writers, I have seen the funny and enlightening burlesque-style performance. Letter writer John Arnerich, who said that Les Mormons are attacking prejudice with prejudice , should be informed that they attack prejudice only with a call for change in myths long overdue for an overhaul. The Les Mormons duo--Curtis York and Robert Daniels--are men ahead of their time, guilty only of assailing the isolation and confusion associated with church-supported bigotry.
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