Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMyth
IN THE NEWS

Myth

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Californians are heading into an intense, critical debate over the level of public service they're willing to pay for. So it's time to puncture some myths. Everyone's entitled to his own opinion, as the late Daniel Patrick Moynihan used to say, but not his own facts. Voters owe it to themselves to separate myth from fact as they begin pondering Gov. Jerry Brown's planned November ballot initiative to temporarily raise about $7 billion annually from higher income taxes on the rich and sales taxes on everyone.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 21, 2012 | By Brian Cronin
BASEBALL URBAN LEGEND : Walter Johnson reenacted a mythical George Washington coin toss. Parson Weems' "A History of the Life and Death, Virtues and Exploits of General George Washington" invented what is perhaps the most famous George Washington anecdote, the tale of young George confessing to cutting down a cherry tree despite knowing that he would most likely be punished severely for his actions. However, Weems also invented a few other Washington anecdotes, including the time young George threw a silver dollar (since they didn't actually have silver dollars, it "must" have been a piece of slate the size of a silver dollar)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Paula Woods
Over the course of nine novels, Scott Turow's Kindle County has become one the best-known settings in American literature. While fictional locations are not uncommon in the crime genre - the city of Santa Teresa in Ross Macdonald's and, later, Sue Grafton's mysteries comes most readily to mind - Turow's character-driven legal thrillers are more aligned with the artistic vision of William Faulkner, whose novels and short stories are set in Yoknapatawpha County,...
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Attention dieters: Many of the “facts” you think you know about obesity and weight loss are wrong. So says a report published in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. An international team of dietitians, doctors and other experts examined more than a dozen ideas about obesity that are widely believed to be true but aren't actually supported by reliable medical evidence. It's not just dieters who buy into these mistaken notions, the study authors note - much of this incorrect conventional wisdom is espoused by physicians, academic scientists, government agencies and (gulp)
HEALTH
December 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
It's not unusual to hear about someone figuratively jumping into their work with both feet. Dr. Peter Lommer Kristensen did it literally. Kristensen, of the Hillerod Hospital in Hillerod, Denmark, and two of his colleagues investigated an old Danish myth that it is possible to get drunk by immersing your feet in alcohol. To do so, they soaked their feet in a washtub containing three bottles of vodka for three hours. They measured blood concentrations of alcohol every half-hour and rated themselves on a scale of 0 to 10 on self-confidence, urge to speak and the number of times they desired spontaneous hugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas
With "The Myth of the American Sleepover," first-time writer-director David Robert Mitchell tells a coming-of-age tale with such freshness and such bemused insight it's as if it has never been told before. Its setting, in the present, is an idyllic Michigan suburb on the last night of summer — just before a new school year starts. Mitchell may focus on several young people but deftly characterizes three to four times that number, and not surprisingly the film won the acting ensemble prize at the South by Southwest Film Festival last year.
SPORTS
September 11, 2009 | Mark Medina
Beware of the story that might be shared today when Michael Jordan is inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame: the one that involves him getting cut as a sophomore from his high school varsity basketball team. It is inconveniently false, Ruby Sutton, physical education teacher at Laney High in Wilmington, N.C., told the Charlotte Observer. "Back then, [most] 10th-graders played JV; that's just the way it was," Sutton said. "Nobody ever 'cut' Michael Jordan." Laney High Athletic Director Fred Lynch, who was then an assistant basketball coach, told the Observer that the team did make an exception that year, though, permitting one sophomore to play on the varsity.
NEWS
May 1, 1992
In response to "More Women, Less Money" (April 19): It is refreshing to have my experiences in the corporate world confirmed. Throughout my education from elementary school on up, we were taught a myth: Both sexes are equal. When I started work with a Fortune 500 company with "lots of opportunities," I continued to be frustrated with the reality of very unequal opportunities in the workplace for women. ANGELIQUE HAISMAN Rancho Cucamonga
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2011
Howard Cosell: The Man, the Myth, and the Transformation of American Sports Mark Ribowsky W.W. Norton: 512 pp., $29.95
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1991
There may be a truth about the Kennedy assassination that we don't know, but we sure don't get it from Stone. He has said that the core of his position is the Abraham Zapruder film of the shooting, which he claims proves that the shot to Kennedy's head had to come from the front. While it is true that the President's head and body did undulate backward, a close look at the film shows that blood and other matter from the head shot burst out forward . Anyone who has seen films or stroboscopic pictures of bullet hits know that matter is ejected not from entry holes, but from exit holes, moving in the same direction as the bullet.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|