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November 30, 2000 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1.1 million ballots that will be convoyed to the state capital beginning today are only made of paper. But they might as well be gold. This morning, votes from Palm Beach County, Fla., are being packed into an armored police truck, with unmarked cars in front and behind, for the 390-mile ride to Tallahassee, Fla. Observers from both major parties likely will tag along.
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NEWS
November 30, 2000 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1.1 million ballots that will be convoyed to the state capital beginning today are only made of paper. But they might as well be gold. This morning, votes from Palm Beach County, Fla., are being packed into an armored police truck, with unmarked cars in front and behind, for the 390-mile ride to Tallahassee, Fla. Observers from both major parties likely will tag along.
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NEWS
November 28, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thorough. Fair. Mainstream. Middle of the road. Those are the labels that lawyers around here use to describe N. Sanders Sauls, the Leon County Circuit Court judge named Monday to preside over the crucial contest phase of Florida's disputed presidential election. But Sauls, 59, is also something of a maverick--a cigar-chewing, bird-hunting, you-don't-like-it-well-too-bad type jurist--born and bred in the Florida Panhandle and known for his old-school ways.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thorough. Fair. Mainstream. Middle of the road. Those are the labels that lawyers around here use to describe N. Sanders Sauls, the Leon County Circuit Court judge named Monday to preside over the crucial contest phase of Florida's disputed presidential election. But Sauls, 59, is also something of a maverick--a cigar-chewing, bird-hunting, you-don't-like-it-well-too-bad type jurist--born and bred in the Florida Panhandle and known for his old-school ways.
NEWS
December 2, 2000
More than three weeks after the election, the battle for the presidency marches on. A decision by the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday's hearing is expected early next week. In addition, the Florida Legislature is considering a special session to appoint electors if court battles extend beyond the Dec. 12 federal deadline to choose them. * Today: Hearing in Leon County by Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls on Al Gore's petition to overturn Florida's results and continue recounts in three counties.
NEWS
November 30, 2000
A summary of Wednesday's developments: * Recounts * Gore's attorneys asked a Florida appeals court for an immediate start to counting disputed ballots. The Gore appeal--of a timetable set Tuesday by Leon County Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls--was expected to be passed up to the state's Supreme Court. * * More than 1.1 million ballots from Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties will be driven today to Tallahassee.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the ballot confetti we now know as chad, the yellow Ryder truck that delivered ballots to a Tallahassee, Fla., court could be the most enduring symbol of this historic election. Now the Chad Chariot can be yours--in an online auction. "It's become a piece of history," said Allison Striegel of Budget Group, which owns the Ryder fleet. Since the truck's Nov.
NEWS
December 3, 2000
Quotes from the Circuit Court hearing Saturday in Tallahassee. "These chads are very, very small, and unless you have very, very, very small hands, I don't know how you could push it out with your finger." --Kimball Brace, president of Election Data Services and a Democratic witness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2000
Vice President Al Gore's double-whammy defeat in the courts Monday would seem to all but assure Texas Gov. George W. Bush the White House. But if the outcome of this nail-biter election is still, technically, unsettled, the locus for a final legal resolution will now certainly be the Florida Supreme Court. Unless, of course, Gore's support inside the Beltway among Democratic politicians, which has held firm since the election, begins to peel away. Congress' top Democratic leaders, Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2000
Re "Rulings Narrow Gore's Options," Nov. 5: What a pity we had a Sauls on the Florida bench when we need a Solomon. Leon County Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls wandered all over the legal landscape reinterpreting statutes and denying the evidence in front of him. To point out one absurdity in his ruling, he recognized the independence of the Florida counties to set their own standards for recounts, but then he denied the right of the individual county...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2000
According to Anthony G. Amsterdam ("The Law Is Left Twisting Slowly in the Wind," Commentary, Dec. 17) the U.S. Supreme Court is guilty of "abandonment of any pretense at behaving like a court of law" because it overturned the Florida Supreme Court's decision to continue recounting the Florida vote. The court did this, according to Amsterdam, because it can and because it "usually gets away with masking result-driven, political, unprincipled decisions in the guise of obedience to rules of law which the judges feel free to twist and retwist to suit their purposes."
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In his last-ditch appeal to the Florida Supreme Court today, Al Gore will argue that the only way to prove he is the actual winner in the state is to count the roughly 14,000 disputed ballots from Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties, sources close to the vice president say. In his stinging ruling Monday, Leon County Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls said Gore had failed to demonstrate "a reasonable probability" that, even if further hand counts were ordered, the election result would be reversed.
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