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Nabors Industries Inc

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June 15, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Nabors Industries Inc. shareholders approved a plan to incorporate in Bermuda to reduce taxes after a federal judge denied a request for a restraining order to block the vote. The world's largest onshore oil- and gas-well drilling company said investors holding 83% of the 111.6 million votes cast approved the move. Houston-based Nabors seeks to join rivals such as GlobalSantaFe Corp. and Transocean Inc., which incorporated abroad in 1999 to lower their taxes.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Nabors Industries Inc. shareholders approved a plan to incorporate in Bermuda to reduce taxes after a federal judge denied a request for a restraining order to block the vote. The world's largest onshore oil- and gas-well drilling company said investors holding 83% of the 111.6 million votes cast approved the move. Houston-based Nabors seeks to join rivals such as GlobalSantaFe Corp. and Transocean Inc., which incorporated abroad in 1999 to lower their taxes.
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BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | RYAN J. DONMOYER, BLOOMBERG NEWS
WASHINGTON -- A Senate panel voted Tuesday to deny tax breaks sought by U.S. firms that change their legal addresses to offshore tax havens such as Bermuda. The Senate Finance Committee approved by voice vote a bill that would, for tax purposes, treat companies that move as if they never left. It's the first action by Congress to stop more such moves, which companies such as Leucadia National Corp. and Stanley Works have said would reduce their taxes to the level of their foreign competitors.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire
Energy stocks fell again Monday as oil prices continued their recent slide. Shares of integrated oil companies and oil field services firms slipped after crude oil fell to a one-month low on expectations that U.S. inventories will stay abundant, as forecasts for mild weather signaled that refiners will restrict heating oil production. Meanwhile, gasoline prices dipped slightly nationally, but rose on the West Coast.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1998 | JAMES K. GLASSMAN, James K. Glassman is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a regular contributor to the Washington Post
Say it isn't so, Marty! That was my reaction when, scanning the pages of the Value Line Mutual Fund Survey a few months ago, I came across the shocking news that Martin J. Whitman--the founder, manager and CEO of Third Avenue Value, one of America's best-performing (and coolest) mutual funds and an icon to buy-and-hold value-hunters around the globe--had moved 45% of his assets out of stocks and into cash and short-term Treasury bonds. Had Marty become a market-timer?
BUSINESS
October 29, 1996 | JAMES F. PELTZ
Sexy it's not. Drilling for oil is a hard, dirty, dangerous and low-profile endeavor, and the mundane names of drilling companies seldom make headlines. Yet their stockholders couldn't be happier. The oil-drilling sector has been the stock market's biggest gusher in 1996, thanks to rising prices for crude oil and--pardon the economic jargon--a tight supply-and-demand trend that's swelling the companies' profits.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country was the model student of the International Monetary Fund, praised around the world for bouncing back so quickly from the Asian economic crisis of 1997. Now it is in danger of flunking out of school. The reason can be divined here at Hanbo Iron & Steel Co.'s sprawling Dangjin Works complex, where a steady stream of 16-wheel trucks loaded with steel bar and coil head for the highway and the South Korean economy.
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