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Nadia Comaneci

NEWS
December 17, 1989 | ROGER SIMON
As soon as I stepped into the office I heard the rumbling. "Tramp!" "Trollop!" "Heifer!" Wait a second, I said. I may have sown a few wild oats in my time, but I'm no heifer. "We are not speaking of you," a colleague informed me. "We are talking about that Commie concubine, Nadia Comaneci." When gymnastics superstar Nadia Comaneci defected to this country the week before last, she became an instant hero. Today, she is a bum. A home-wrecker, a harlot, a hussy.
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NEWS
December 15, 1989 | MIKE CLARY, Clary, a Miami free - lance writer, contributes frequently to The Times
Once she was a perfect 10. Small and lithe, at 14 Nadia Comaneci had the dark-eyed look of a pixie and a way of flipping her hand at the end of a floor routine that charmed the judges at the Montreal Olympics and fans the world over. That year, 1976, the diminutive Romanian became the first gymnast ever to receive a perfect score in Olympic competition. She won three gold medals and millions of American hearts.
SPORTS
December 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Nadia Comaneci plopped down nearly $20,000 in traveler's checks on a Camaro convertible and shopped her way through clothing stores this week, sales clerks said. Escorted by Constantin Panait, the married roofer who has accompanied the Olympic gold-medal gymnast since she fled Romania, Comaneci was staying in a $130-a-night suite at the Best Western Beachcomber Resort and Villas here through Wednesday morning.
SPORTS
December 13, 1989 | MIKE DOWNEY
My people took a meeting with the people at Fox, Disney, Warner Bros., Paramount, Columbia, Orion and Universal, simultaneously. They all wanted to hear my idea. "It's about this girl," I said. "She's Romanian." "Meryl Streep," a studio head said. "Not so fast. When the story opens, she's 14 years old." "Molly Ringwald." "Just listen," I said. "She's a gymnast. She was born in Moldavia." "Where's Moldavia?" the Fox head said. "Next to Ishtar," the Columbia head said.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former Olympic gold medalist Nadia Comaneci says she has a business relationship with the married father of four who helped her escape from Romania, not a romantic one. "He's not my lover boy, he's my manager," she told the Sun-Sentinel in Ft. Lauderdale during a telephone interview Tuesday. The 28-year-old gold medalist, who has shared a hotel room with Constantin Panait for the last week, added: "It is all a big lie and you are very bad. . . . (Panait) is just trying to help me.
SPORTS
December 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
Nadia Comaneci will need her most nimble footwork since her perfect score on the balance beam to salvage her marketing potential, now that her relationship with a married father of four children has been made public. "I think there are some problems. No one is going to touch her right now," said Jay Ogden, senior vice president of International Management Group, which handles endorsements for U.S. gymnast Bart Conner. "She's an intriguing sports figure.
SPORTS
December 6, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former gymnast Nadia Comaneci and the married roofer who arranged her defection from Romania revealed their romance Tuesday, but they repeatedly shunned questions about their immediate personal plans. Comaneci made it clear, however, that she has no desire to become involved with gymnastics in the United States. Appearing bewildered by the more than 100 journalists at a news conference in Hollywood, Fla.
SPORTS
December 2, 1989 | GARR KLUENDER
The recent defection of Romania's Nadia Comaneci calls to mind her sudden rise as the world's premier female gymnast in the 1976 Olympic Games at Montreal, and how it caught many journalists off guard. Or at least ill-informed. One reporter recalls wandering through the Olympic press center one afternoon and being attracted to a gathering of U.S. sportswriters receiving a lecture from another sportswriter, the late columnist Dick Young of the New York Daily News.
SPORTS
December 2, 1989 | VLADIMIR MORARU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like all Romanians who have left their countries, I've been reading and watching the news with particular fervor this autumn. Poland, Hungary, the Berlin Wall, Czechoslovakia . . . Nothing about Romania. At least nothing new about Romania. Until Nadia Comaneci, the most famous Romanian athlete ever, the national heroine, the girl every Romanian parent wanted his or her girl to be like, decided that enough was enough and crossed the border to, of all places, Hungary. It was big news.
SPORTS
December 2, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci was on a tour of the United States in 1981, the two men who had the most impact on her career, her coach, Bela Karolyi, and her choreographer, Geza Pozsar, defected. They said this week that they had considered asking Comaneci, who was 19 at the time, to join them, but decided against it--not because they feared that she would reject them, but because they feared that she would accept.
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