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Nadia Prasad

SPORTS
March 13, 1999 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 18,000 Americans will be among the 20,000 runners participating Sunday in the 14th Los Angeles Marathon. But none will win. The winner of the 26.2-mile race will emerge from a group of about three dozen "elite" runners brought in to enhance the event's status. Most are Africans. None are Americans. "We'd all love to have an American," says Anne Roberts, who recruits the top runners for the Los Angeles, New York and Lisbon marathons. "But if there isn't one, we can't manufacture one."
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SPORTS
March 4, 1995 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has been fifth in Boston, third in New York twice, and no one in Sunday's Los Angeles Marathon has run 26.2 miles faster than Arturo Barrios' 2 hours 8 minutes 28 seconds. "I have confidence in my training, confidence in myself," he said. "I think it's my time to win." And, equally important, win in a fast time.
SPORTS
November 6, 1994 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the corner of 67th Street and West Drive, at the end of a corridor of portable grandstands and under a street light in Central Park, a statue was unveiled Friday. Fred Lebow didn't live to see the 25th running of his race, the New York City Marathon, but his tribute in bronze--a bearded man in billed cap, peering down at a watch on his left wrist--looks out over the finish line.
SPORTS
March 30, 1998 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lornah Kiplagat experienced a breakthrough in last year's Los Angeles Marathon, but returned home to Kenya with a tainted victory. On Sunday, she finally--and joyously--got to break the tape. Kiplagat, 23, won the women's race in 2 hours, 34 minutes, 3 seconds and became only the second winner to defend a title in the Los Angeles Marathon's 13-year history.
SPORTS
February 25, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boston has the best, the world's most renowned distance runners lured by cash and tradition to the Rose Bowl of marathons in April. This year, it even has some of the rest, thousands of nonqualifiers having been drawn in a lottery to celebrate the 100th Boston Marathon by starting in the back of the pack, taking half an hour to get to the starting line in Hopkinton, Mass., and perhaps the rest of the day to get downtown to the public library, 26 miles 385 yards away.
SPORTS
March 12, 1999 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If this is March and she's in Los Angeles, it must be cold season for Lornah Kiplagat, the two-time defending women's champion in the L.A. Marathon. But as she sits for an interview in the coffee shop at a downtown hotel, sipping tea, Kiplagat is surprisingly clearheaded. Her eyes are not watery. Her throat is not scratchy. Her head is not pounding. "I'm doing fine," she says. If Kiplagat, 24, were superstitious, this might be unsettling.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | LARRY GORDON and CHRIS BAKER and LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Neither slippery streets nor soggy sneakers deterred the runners, bicyclists and wheelchair racers in Sunday's 10th annual Los Angeles Marathon, although the unrelenting rainstorm cut back on traditional crowds of sidewalk fans and party animals. The weather--the first daylong rain in L.A. Marathon history--contributed to a handful of nasty spills among the more than 10,000 bicyclists who took up the marathon's first-ever offer to ride the 26.2-mile route of auto-free boulevards.
SPORTS
March 6, 1995
1. Rolando Vera, Ecuador 2:11:39 2. Bob Kempainen, Minnetonka, Minn. 2:11:59 3. Martin Pitayo, Mexico 2:12:49 4. Arturo Barrios, Boulder, Colo. 2:14:47 5. Mark Plaatjes, Boulder, Colo. 2:15:41 6. Jose Santana, Brazil 2:18:01 7. Danny Ree, Riverside 2:21:06 8. Daniel Martinez, Alhambra 2:21:35 9. Hiroyuki Ito, Japan 2:23:33 10. Katsuya Natsume, Japan 2:23:54 11. Hector Lopez, Los Angeles 2:25:42 12. Michael Alexander, Trinidad Tobago 2:25:58 13. Marcos Juarez, Guatemala 2:26:03 14.
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