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Nadine Gordimer

BOOKS
October 6, 1991 | Dick Roraback, Roraback is a member of the Book Review staff.
Nadine Gordimer takes you by the hand. Sometimes she leads you gently. Sometimes, impatient, she yanks. Come, she says, there are things I want you to see. We've been over Gordimer turf before. We know the field is not level. As always, there are salients of insensitivity, injustice, inhumanity--apartheid. After so many tours, can there be something we missed? There can. There is. Our cicerone knows where the real stuff is--new insights, apercus, epiphanies, buried under layers of complacency.
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NEWS
October 4, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nadine Gordimer, whose uncompromising novels and short stories pricked the conscience of white South Africans and angered apartheid governments for nearly four decades, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The 67-year-old author of such anti-apartheid classics as "Burger's Daughter," "July's People" and "The Conservationist" was the first woman tapped by the Royal Swedish Academy for the literature prize in 25 years.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nadine Gordimer looks nothing like a radical, standing just 5-feet-1, with gray hair and a face gently wrinkled by 67 years in the African sun. But for four decades, this unassuming, strong-willed white woman has used her manual Hermes typewriter to give the world some of the most perceptive and uncompromising works of fiction ever written about her homeland, South Africa.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | Associated Press
From the 1990 novel "My Son's Story," a passage describing the work of a white anti-apartheid activist who becomes involved romantically with a married black man: The nature of work she did develops high emotions. It arises from crises. It deals only with disruption, disjunction--circumstances in people's lives that cannot be met with the responses that serve for continuity.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The changes in her country have been "tremendous," and in some ways quite astonishing. "I began to feel I would never live to see the African National Congress unbanned," said Nadine Gordimer, the novelist who has been called the conscience of South Africa, on a recent visit here. "I thought I would never live to see (Nelson) Mandela and the other leaders out of prison."
OPINION
August 26, 1990 | Scott Kraft, Scott Kraft is The Times' bureau chief in Johannesburg. He interviewed the author in her home
It has been 40 years since the white Parliament passed the infamous laws creating "grand apartheid." During that same year, the New Yorker published a short story by an unknown 26-year-old South African. That story launched a writing career that has reached a vast international reading audience, angered successive white South African governments and earned the author regular mention as a leading candidate for the Nobel Prize for Literature.
BOOKS
April 2, 1989 | Hermione Lee, Lee teaches English at the University of York in York, England.
What does literature do? What is it for? These splendid essays, selected from 25 years' worth of sharp, firm responses to the particularly grotesque and challenging conditions for writers in South Africa, do nothing less than answer these huge questions. But they are not bombastic utterances. Nadine Gordimer is an unboastful, honest writer who dislikes cant.
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