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Nagasaki

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TRAVEL
June 23, 2013
Nanjing, Nagasaki, past and present The juxtaposition of two articles on the Far East, one on Nanjing, past and present ("A Spirit of Trial and Triumph" by David Kelly), the other on the history of Nagasaki ("A New Life in a New Era" by Andrew Bender), brings to mind a Robert Burns poem wherein he observes, "Man's inhumanity to man makes countless thousands mourn. " The Rape of Nanking, as Nanjing was once called, by the Japanese army in 1937 after that country invaded China, resulted in 300,000 Chinese being slaughtered in a six-week orgy of unimagined violence.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Early in his new history of humanity's embrace of nuclear energy and radiation, Craig Nelson writes about the impoverished 19-year-old Manya Sklowdowska and her lover, Casimir Zorawski, the eldest child in a wealthy Polish farming family for whom she worked as a nanny. His parents rejected the girl as below their station. The college-student son acquiesced, married someone else and went on to become a "well-regarded mathematician in Poland. " The jilted Manya became Marie Curie. The story of the star-crossed lovers and the unforeseen consequences of a single decision dovetail nicely with the sweep of our engagement with nuclear science.
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TRAVEL
August 6, 1989 | PETER S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
Every few days, as a luxury foreign cruise ship emerges from the Inland Sea of Japan and enters the harbor, the old woman watches. The ship takes the same route the Portuguese did hundreds of years ago, rounding a natural anchorage and heading for a berth at one of Nagasaki's piers. Tugboats greet the ship with toots of their horns.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
For anyone interested in the politics of left and right--and in political journalism as it is practiced at the highest level, Orwell's works are indispensable. This week, in the year marks the 110th anniversary of his birth, we present a personal list of his five greatest essays.   Published a mere two and a half months after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Orwell's "You and the Atomic Bomb"  is notable as one of the first efforts to divine the social and political implications of a new weapon of previously unimaginable power.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
News of the "tremendous, large bomb" that destroyed Hiroshima first reached her hometown in Japan over the radio. "We didn't know anything about atomic bombs at that time," recalls Tsuyuko (Dewie) Janzen of Mission Viejo. "They just said it was something they had never seen before." Janzen, then 17-year-old Tsuyuko Tarumoto, was home from college in Tokyo for the summer that August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1985 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Kazuo Yoshikawa was 15 years old and working in a Mazda weapons factory about three miles northeast of Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945--the day the United States dropped an atom bomb on his city. Yoshikawa remembered seeing blinding light, then the entire building collapsed around him. "The walls came down, the roof collapsed and I ended up underneath a lot of wood and machinery," he recalled. He suffered no radiation burns but lost all his hair three days later. Tsuyuko Tarumoto was at home on Aug.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
For anyone interested in the politics of left and right--and in political journalism as it is practiced at the highest level, Orwell's works are indispensable. This week, in the year marks the 110th anniversary of his birth, we present a personal list of his five greatest essays.   Published a mere two and a half months after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Orwell's "You and the Atomic Bomb"  is notable as one of the first efforts to divine the social and political implications of a new weapon of previously unimaginable power.
NEWS
May 10, 1985 | From Reuters
Several hundred people set out Thursday on marches from Tokyo to Hiroshima and Nagasaki to protest against nuclear weapons. They plan to reach the cities before the 40th anniversary of the United States' atomic bombing of Hiroshima on Aug. 6 and Nagasaki three days later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1991
As long as I have to listen to people crying, "Remember Hiroshima and Nagasaki," I'll be shouting, "Remember Pearl Harbor"! MICHAEL FREMONT Temple City
WORLD
March 25, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A 93-year-old man is the first person certified as a survivor of both U.S. atomic bombings at the end of World War II. Tsutomu Yamaguchi had already been certified as surviving the Aug. 9, 1945, attack on Nagasaki. Now he has been confirmed as surviving that on Hiroshima three days earlier. Yamaguchi was in Hiroshima on a business trip on Aug. 6, 1945. He suffered serious burns to his upper body and spent the night in the city. He returned to his hometown of Nagasaki just before the second attack, city officials said.
TRAVEL
June 23, 2013
Nanjing, Nagasaki, past and present The juxtaposition of two articles on the Far East, one on Nanjing, past and present ("A Spirit of Trial and Triumph" by David Kelly), the other on the history of Nagasaki ("A New Life in a New Era" by Andrew Bender), brings to mind a Robert Burns poem wherein he observes, "Man's inhumanity to man makes countless thousands mourn. " The Rape of Nanking, as Nanjing was once called, by the Japanese army in 1937 after that country invaded China, resulted in 300,000 Chinese being slaughtered in a six-week orgy of unimagined violence.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
They pulled a bit of history out of the English Channel on Monday. Experts from the Royal Air Force Museum lifted a rare Dornier Do 17 bomber from the seafloor near Kent. The plane, shot down during the Battle of Britain in 1940, is believed to be the sole survivor of its type from Nazi Germany's Luftwaffe. OK, you say, and exactly why I should care about a rusty old warplane from 73 years ago? Does “Those who don't know history are destined to repeat it” ring any bells?
TRAVEL
June 9, 2013
THE BEST WAY TO NAGASAKI, JAPAN From LAX, connecting service to Nagasaki is available on All Nippon. Restricted round-trip airfares begin at $783, including taxes and fees. Trams serve the major sights and hotels. $1.50 per ride or $5 day pass purchased at hotels. TELEPHONES To call the numbers below from the U.S., dial 011 (the international dialing code), 81 (country code for Japan) and the local number. WHERE TO STAY Garden Terrace Nagasaki Hotel, 2-3 Akizuki-machi, Nagasaki; 95-864-7777, http://www.gt-nagasaki.jp/ . This showpiece hotel is worth the trip across town.
TRAVEL
June 9, 2013 | By Andrew Bender
NAGASAKI, Japan - On my first trip to Nagasaki, just out of college, I knew what most of the world knows: An atomic bomb fell here on Aug. 9, 1945, bringing World War II to a close. It wasn't until my second visit, more than 20 years later on a guidebook assignment, that I realized how much I had missed. Although the A-bomb is rightfully front and center for overseas visitors, the Japanese concept of the city is very different. As Japan's westernmost major port, it was the nation's first landing spot for Catholic missionaries and martyrs; red-bearded, waistcoated, fancy-hatted traders; and exotic foods borne by trade winds.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
It's called the Trinity Site, an expanse of baked-white land in the middle of the Chihuahuan Desert - the spot where "the gadget" was set off, launching an era of nuclear proliferation. Reactions to this place - the site of the world's first atomic bomb test on July 16, 1945 - vary widely and are usually influenced by age and background. For a 65-year-old Californian, it summons images of having to hunker below her school desk in a drill during the Cold War. For a 79-year-old Texan, it conjures up memories of sitting next to the radio as joyous news arrived - World War II was over and the boys were finally coming home.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Radiation exposure is sadly all too familiar to the people of Japan. The health effects of radiation were poorly understood until the United States dropped atomic bombs on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki toward the end of World War II. Prior to that time, scientists had widely mixed views on the impact of radiation exposure. "There was a strange kind of love-hate attitude about radiation before that," said Dr. William McBride, a professor of radiation oncology at UCLA and a Jonsson Cancer Center researcher who has looked at the consequences of radiation exposure after a radiological or nuclear terrorist attack.
OPINION
August 4, 1985
I firmly believe that if the atomic bomb had not been propped on Japan to end this evil war, it, or perhaps a bigger bomb, would have been dropped somewhere since. But Hiroshima and Nagasaki showed how horrible nuclear war is, and so far none has been dropped since. And, hopefully, never again. SCOTT HILBERS Huntington Beach
OPINION
August 7, 2005
Re "Why feel guilty about Hiroshima?" Opinion, Aug. 3 Max Boot describes some of the horrors of warfare, concluding with the statement that he doesn't "think the atomic bombing of Japan was a uniquely reprehensible event." The fact that it may not have been "uniquely" reprehensible is hardly a reason for us all not to feel guilt and shame about our inability to conduct human affairs without resorting to the horrors that warfare represents. And what about Nagasaki? Three days after Hiroshima, the second bomb fell specifically on that portion of Nagasaki that was the focus of Christianity in Japan.
HOME & GARDEN
November 6, 2010 | By Sam Watters, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The current crop of television bachelors is pitiful. They settle for sex-lite in the pool, Champagne magnums, satin-lapelled tuxedos and RV limos. Worse, they're short the ultimate endowment: the bachelor pad, depriving male viewers of inventive solutions to single living. West Hollywood millionaire bachelor Hal B. Hayes would have laughed at these Romeos. Bachelor life is a dicey choice, subject to changing norms. In the 19th century, marriage was an expensive commitment. Husbands were expected to support their wives, who stayed at home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2009 | Associated Press
Charles Donald Albury, copilot of the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, during World War II, has died. He was 88. Albury died May 23 at a hospital in Orlando, Fla., after years of congestive heart failure. Family Funeral Care in Orlando confirmed his death. Albury helped fly the B-29 Superfortress, nicknamed Bockscar, that dropped the bomb on Aug. 9, 1945.
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