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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2009 | David Zahniser and Phil Willon
After nearly two years of fending off criticism from ratepayers and his own employees, H. David Nahai stepped down Friday as head of the nation's largest municipally owned utility, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. Nahai, 56, said in a letter to Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa that he would leave immediately to take a position as an advisor to former President Clinton's climate initiative to battle global warming. But well before he announced his new job, the Iranian-born environmentalist and attorney found himself under fire on several fronts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2010 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Tensions ran so high in the executive ranks of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power last year that the utility hired an organizational psychologist to sort out the ill feelings. The psychologist received nearly $50,000 under a contract that required him to give only an oral report to Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's office. As a result, there is no written record, a DWP spokesman said. But several sources said the psychologist found an intense battle between the two men attempting to carry out Villaraigosa's policies: then-General Manager H. David Nahai and Raman Raj, the No. 2 executive.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2009 | David Zahniser
Officials at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power plan to give a consulting contract to the agency's outgoing general manager that would pay him the same salary he earned as its top executive. Days after he resigned, H. David Nahai is slated to receive nearly $6,300 per week as a consultant to the utility. The DWP commission, whose five members are appointed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, is scheduled to meet Tuesday to discuss the plan. DWP commission President Lee Kanon Alpert said he asked Nahai to stay on as a consultant for the rest of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2009 | Phil Willon
Los Angeles city officials have released the terms of the controversial consulting contract for the former general manager of the Department of Water and Power, H. David Nahai, who resigned this month. Under the three-month contract, Nahai can earn a maximum of $82,000 to "provide consulting services and provide knowledge transfer relating to issues that arose during his tenure as chief executive officer and general manager." Nahai is required to make himself available by phone or e-mail during normal work hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2009 | Phil Willon
Los Angeles city officials have released the terms of the controversial consulting contract for the former general manager of the Department of Water and Power, H. David Nahai, who resigned this month. Under the three-month contract, Nahai can earn a maximum of $82,000 to "provide consulting services and provide knowledge transfer relating to issues that arose during his tenure as chief executive officer and general manager." Nahai is required to make himself available by phone or e-mail during normal work hours.
OPINION
October 7, 2009
'Nothing's going on here," Board of Water and Power Commissioners President Lee Kanon Alpert insisted at Tuesday's meeting, sounding woefully similar to a certain Wizard urging Dorothy and friends not to peek behind the curtain. Alpert's intent was to convince onlookers that there was nothing nefarious about plans by the Department of Water and Power to pay its outgoing chief, H. David Nahai, his full salary through the end of the year in exchange for "consulting" services. After all, Alpert said, smaller city departments have made similar deals with departing executives for even longer terms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | David Zahniser
The panel that oversees the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power voted Tuesday to name Deputy Mayor S. David Freeman interim general manager, paying him $6,250 per week at the same time the agency retains its recently departed top executive as a consultant. The commission, whose members are appointed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, voted 3 to 0 to hire Freeman starting Tuesday. Meanwhile, the agency will pay former General Manager H. David Nahai, who announced his resignation Friday, $6,292 per week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2006 | Cynthia H. Cho, Times Staff Writer
Shortly after being appointed last September, members of the board that guides the nation's largest municipal utility began receiving complaints about cronyism and nepotism from employees at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. What was most shocking, said H. David Nahai, the Water and Power Commission's vice president, was the discovery that the department did not formally evaluate its 8,000 workers each year.
OPINION
October 9, 2009 | Richard Nemec, Richard Nemec is a Los Angeles writer who covers energy for several national trade publications.
When I first read the news last spring that Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa had named S. David Freeman as his deputy mayor for environmental and energy programs, I was sure that H. David Nahai's tenure as general manager at the city utility, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, would be short. Fast-forward to now: Nahai has resigned, and the mayor has proposed -- and the commission that oversees the DWP has approved -- Freeman, 83, to be the interim chief for six months. Thus the political musical chairs in the DWP's executive suite continue.
BOOKS
October 14, 2001 | MARCOS McPEEK VILLATORO, Marcos McPeek Villatoro is the author, most recently, of "Home Killings: A Romilia Chacon Mystery" and holds the Fletcher Jones-endowed chair in writing at Mount St. Mary's College, Los Angeles
Look in my laundry room cabinet here in Los Angeles and you'll find a Mason jar of clear alcohol. It's never been opened, but I know its smell, its taste. Shake the jar: Bubbles will form on top and separate clean down the middle like a zipper: a good batch. My father, born on Clinch Mountain in east Tennessee 81 years ago, gave it to me when I moved to California. His cousin Willie brewed it.
OPINION
October 9, 2009 | Richard Nemec, Richard Nemec is a Los Angeles writer who covers energy for several national trade publications.
When I first read the news last spring that Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa had named S. David Freeman as his deputy mayor for environmental and energy programs, I was sure that H. David Nahai's tenure as general manager at the city utility, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, would be short. Fast-forward to now: Nahai has resigned, and the mayor has proposed -- and the commission that oversees the DWP has approved -- Freeman, 83, to be the interim chief for six months. Thus the political musical chairs in the DWP's executive suite continue.
OPINION
October 7, 2009
'Nothing's going on here," Board of Water and Power Commissioners President Lee Kanon Alpert insisted at Tuesday's meeting, sounding woefully similar to a certain Wizard urging Dorothy and friends not to peek behind the curtain. Alpert's intent was to convince onlookers that there was nothing nefarious about plans by the Department of Water and Power to pay its outgoing chief, H. David Nahai, his full salary through the end of the year in exchange for "consulting" services. After all, Alpert said, smaller city departments have made similar deals with departing executives for even longer terms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | David Zahniser
The panel that oversees the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power voted Tuesday to name Deputy Mayor S. David Freeman interim general manager, paying him $6,250 per week at the same time the agency retains its recently departed top executive as a consultant. The commission, whose members are appointed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, voted 3 to 0 to hire Freeman starting Tuesday. Meanwhile, the agency will pay former General Manager H. David Nahai, who announced his resignation Friday, $6,292 per week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2009 | David Zahniser
Officials at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power plan to give a consulting contract to the agency's outgoing general manager that would pay him the same salary he earned as its top executive. Days after he resigned, H. David Nahai is slated to receive nearly $6,300 per week as a consultant to the utility. The DWP commission, whose five members are appointed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, is scheduled to meet Tuesday to discuss the plan. DWP commission President Lee Kanon Alpert said he asked Nahai to stay on as a consultant for the rest of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2009 | David Zahniser and Phil Willon
After nearly two years of fending off criticism from ratepayers and his own employees, H. David Nahai stepped down Friday as head of the nation's largest municipally owned utility, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. Nahai, 56, said in a letter to Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa that he would leave immediately to take a position as an advisor to former President Clinton's climate initiative to battle global warming. But well before he announced his new job, the Iranian-born environmentalist and attorney found himself under fire on several fronts.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2009 | Alana Semuels
The gig: As chief executive and general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Nahai, 56, heads the largest municipal utility in the country. It supplies electricity and water to residents, employs more than 8,500 workers and has an annual budget of more than $4 billion. He's led efforts to conserve water and shift the utility to renewable sources of energy. Background: Born in Iran, Nahai moved to England when he was 10 to attend boarding school and college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2007 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
Making a move that had been expected for weeks, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Monday he had nominated one of his close allies, attorney H. David Nahai, to run the city's Department of Water and Power. The City Council still must vote to confirm Nahai, who spent two years as a Villaraigosa appointee on the five-member, volunteer Board of Water and Power Commissioners, which oversees the DWP.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | CHARLOTTE INNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bestselling novelist Gina B. Nahai was talking to a woman she'd known from her childhood in Iran, when the friend shocked her with a story Nahai had never heard before. "She's telling me someone else's story, and she says, 'All this happened when I got out of the hospital.' And I say, 'What?' And she says, 'Well, you know, after my mother threw me off the roof.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2007 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
Making a move that had been expected for weeks, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Monday he had nominated one of his close allies, attorney H. David Nahai, to run the city's Department of Water and Power. The City Council still must vote to confirm Nahai, who spent two years as a Villaraigosa appointee on the five-member, volunteer Board of Water and Power Commissioners, which oversees the DWP.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2006 | Cynthia H. Cho, Times Staff Writer
Shortly after being appointed last September, members of the board that guides the nation's largest municipal utility began receiving complaints about cronyism and nepotism from employees at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. What was most shocking, said H. David Nahai, the Water and Power Commission's vice president, was the discovery that the department did not formally evaluate its 8,000 workers each year.
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