Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNajib Mikati
IN THE NEWS

Najib Mikati

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
March 23, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - A day after announcing his resignation as prime minister, Najib Mikati on Saturday called for a "salvation" government to run deeply divided Lebanon amid grave concerns about ongoing instability and increasing spillover effects from the war in neighboring Syria. President Michel Suleiman accepted Mikati's resignation Saturday, and the outgoing prime minister agreed to head a caretaker government until his replacement is named. Mikati, 57, stepped down as lawmakers remained deadlocked about a long-debated election law and the future of the nation's internal security forces chief.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
November 19, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
BEIRUT -- A pair of explosions apparently targeting the Iranian Embassy rocked a southern Beirut neighborhood early Tuesday, leaving at least 20 dead, including an Iranian diplomat, and close to 100 injured, authorities said. The casualty count was expected to rise. The attacks appeared to be the latest spillover of violence from neighboring Syria, where a civil war has been raging for more than two years. Iran is a major ally of the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.
Advertisement
WORLD
January 25, 2011 | By Meris Lutz, Los Angeles Times
Lebanon's long-standing political crisis deepened Monday when supporters of the country's Sunni Muslim leadership called for protests over the apparently imminent appointment of a Hezbollah-backed candidate as the prime minister of a new government. Supporters of caretaker Prime Minister Saad Hariri vowed to take to the streets Tuesday in a "day of popular anger" in response to the announcement that a bloc headed by Hezbollah, a Shiite Muslim group, would back businessman Najib Mikati for the premier's post.
WORLD
April 6, 2013 | By Ned Parker and Lava Selo
BEIRUT -- Lebanon's political blocs united behind a compromise choice for prime minister Saturday, two weeks after his predecessor quit office under the cloud of the civil war in neighboring Syria.  Tammam Salam, endorsed nearly unanimously by the parliament, vowed in a televised speech to maintain a stable Lebanon and to shield the country from the troubles next door. He was tasked with forming a Cabinet by Lebanese President Michel Suleiman and approved by 124 of the 128 parliament members.
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Meris Lutz, Los Angeles Times
The ascent of a Hezbollah-backed billionaire to the prime minister's post in deeply divided Lebanon on Tuesday sparked rioting and protests by Sunni Muslims and pushed the country into uncertainty. Lebanon's new prime minister-designate, Najib Mikati, pledged to pursue an independent, centrist path and insisted that he was not beholden to Hezbollah, a Shiite Muslim militia and political organization. But his words did little to mollify supporters of former Prime Minister Saad Hariri, the powerful leader of the country's Sunni community.
WORLD
April 20, 2005 | From Reuters
Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati formed a new government Tuesday, boosting the chances that a general election can be held on time, and said he would immediately seek the removal of pro-Syria security chiefs. "I demanded the resignation of the security chiefs when I was [just] Najib Mikati. Now I'm prime minister and I will relay my point of view to the Cabinet ... and I promise that it will agree with me," Mikati said.
WORLD
April 6, 2013 | By Ned Parker and Lava Selo
BEIRUT -- Lebanon's political blocs united behind a compromise choice for prime minister Saturday, two weeks after his predecessor quit office under the cloud of the civil war in neighboring Syria.  Tammam Salam, endorsed nearly unanimously by the parliament, vowed in a televised speech to maintain a stable Lebanon and to shield the country from the troubles next door. He was tasked with forming a Cabinet by Lebanese President Michel Suleiman and approved by 124 of the 128 parliament members.
WORLD
May 25, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The United States is upping pressure on Lebanon to reduce its ties to neighboring Syria in an effort to further isolate President Bashar Assad as his security forces violently suppress a pro-democracy movement, according to diplomats and officials. Visiting Beirut last week, the State Department's Middle East envoy, Jeffrey D. Feltman, bluntly warned Lebanese officials that the tide had turned against the autocratic four-decade-old Damascus regime and urged them to distance themselves from a nation that has long been a major player in Lebanese political life, a Western diplomat and Lebanese officials said.
WORLD
November 19, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
BEIRUT -- A pair of explosions apparently targeting the Iranian Embassy rocked a southern Beirut neighborhood early Tuesday, leaving at least 20 dead, including an Iranian diplomat, and close to 100 injured, authorities said. The casualty count was expected to rise. The attacks appeared to be the latest spillover of violence from neighboring Syria, where a civil war has been raging for more than two years. Iran is a major ally of the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.
WORLD
June 14, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
After a five-month deadlock that sowed uncertainty in politically fragile Lebanon, the country's prime minister on Monday further inflamed passions by announcing a new government heavily dominated by the Iranian- and Syrian-backed Shiite Muslim militia Hezbollah and its allies. Analysts described the new Cabinet as a relic from the past, when Syria thoroughly dominated politics in Lebanon, and said it bode ill for Lebanese democracy at a time of uprisings across the Arab world. "It shows how Lebanon is basically moving in the opposite direction of the 'Arab Spring,' " said Oussama Safa, director of the Lebanese Center for Policy Studies, a Beirut think tank.
WORLD
March 23, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - A day after announcing his resignation as prime minister, Najib Mikati on Saturday called for a "salvation" government to run deeply divided Lebanon amid grave concerns about ongoing instability and increasing spillover effects from the war in neighboring Syria. President Michel Suleiman accepted Mikati's resignation Saturday, and the outgoing prime minister agreed to head a caretaker government until his replacement is named. Mikati, 57, stepped down as lawmakers remained deadlocked about a long-debated election law and the future of the nation's internal security forces chief.
WORLD
June 14, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
After a five-month deadlock that sowed uncertainty in politically fragile Lebanon, the country's prime minister on Monday further inflamed passions by announcing a new government heavily dominated by the Iranian- and Syrian-backed Shiite Muslim militia Hezbollah and its allies. Analysts described the new Cabinet as a relic from the past, when Syria thoroughly dominated politics in Lebanon, and said it bode ill for Lebanese democracy at a time of uprisings across the Arab world. "It shows how Lebanon is basically moving in the opposite direction of the 'Arab Spring,' " said Oussama Safa, director of the Lebanese Center for Policy Studies, a Beirut think tank.
WORLD
May 25, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The United States is upping pressure on Lebanon to reduce its ties to neighboring Syria in an effort to further isolate President Bashar Assad as his security forces violently suppress a pro-democracy movement, according to diplomats and officials. Visiting Beirut last week, the State Department's Middle East envoy, Jeffrey D. Feltman, bluntly warned Lebanese officials that the tide had turned against the autocratic four-decade-old Damascus regime and urged them to distance themselves from a nation that has long been a major player in Lebanese political life, a Western diplomat and Lebanese officials said.
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Meris Lutz, Los Angeles Times
The ascent of a Hezbollah-backed billionaire to the prime minister's post in deeply divided Lebanon on Tuesday sparked rioting and protests by Sunni Muslims and pushed the country into uncertainty. Lebanon's new prime minister-designate, Najib Mikati, pledged to pursue an independent, centrist path and insisted that he was not beholden to Hezbollah, a Shiite Muslim militia and political organization. But his words did little to mollify supporters of former Prime Minister Saad Hariri, the powerful leader of the country's Sunni community.
WORLD
January 25, 2011 | By Meris Lutz, Los Angeles Times
Lebanon's long-standing political crisis deepened Monday when supporters of the country's Sunni Muslim leadership called for protests over the apparently imminent appointment of a Hezbollah-backed candidate as the prime minister of a new government. Supporters of caretaker Prime Minister Saad Hariri vowed to take to the streets Tuesday in a "day of popular anger" in response to the announcement that a bloc headed by Hezbollah, a Shiite Muslim group, would back businessman Najib Mikati for the premier's post.
WORLD
April 20, 2005 | From Reuters
Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati formed a new government Tuesday, boosting the chances that a general election can be held on time, and said he would immediately seek the removal of pro-Syria security chiefs. "I demanded the resignation of the security chiefs when I was [just] Najib Mikati. Now I'm prime minister and I will relay my point of view to the Cabinet ... and I promise that it will agree with me," Mikati said.
WORLD
April 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati promised that parliamentary elections would be held by May 29, two days ahead of deadline, and two top pro-Syria security chiefs stepped down. The resignations by Maj. Gen. Jamil Sayyed, considered the most powerful security chief in Lebanon, and Maj. Gen. Ali Hajj, the top police commander, came before a United Nations team investigating the Feb. 14 assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri was expected to come to Lebanon.
WORLD
April 16, 2005 | From Associated Press
Lebanon's president on Friday named moderate pro-Syria lawmaker Najib Mikati prime minister, breaking a political deadlock and reviving chances of a parliamentary election next month. The vote is crucial for the opposition, which backed the Harvard-educated millionaire businessman in an effort to end the impasse in forming a government and open the way for the election that many believe will end Syria's hold on parliament. The legislature's term expires at the end of May.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|