Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNajibullah
IN THE NEWS

Najibullah

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ousted President Najibullah spends what may well be the last days of his life in a small room with a television and a radio. There are only a few chairs, enough for his trusted brother and the two generals who remain by his side. Every hour he sits, he waits to learn whether he will live or die. Holed up in a loosely guarded U.N.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 23, 2010 | By Tina Susman and Richard A. Serrano
Reporting from Washington and New York Richard A. Serrano -- An Afghan immigrant admitted to a federal judge Monday that he was so enraged by U.S. military actions in Afghanistan that he attended an Al Qaeda training camp and planned to commit a suicide bombing in New York -- possibly on the subway -- to protest the war. The plot was thwarted in September after the immigrant, Najibullah Zazi, began to fear that police were trailing him and left...
Advertisement
NEWS
October 6, 1987 | United Press International
Afghan President Najib has issued a statement asking to be called by his full name of Najibullah, the official Tass news agency said Sunday. In an interview, Najibullah said that since he was elected head of state Sept. 30, the name Najib, a nickname he has had since college, no longer suits him.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2009 | By Tina Susman
An Afghan native accused of plotting to bomb targets in New York using homemade explosives mixed from hair dye and other beauty products is likely to face additional charges, prosecutors said today. Najibullah Zazi, 24, was arrested in September and has pleaded not guilty to charges of conspiring to use weapons of mass destruction. Zazi was living in Denver when he was arrested but is being held in New York, where prosecutors said the alleged plot was due to unfold on the most recent anniversary of the Sept.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Ten days before Soviet troops are scheduled to begin withdrawing from his country, President Najibullah of Afghanistan met Wednesday with Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi at the start of a visit intended to boost the Kabul regime's morale. Najibullah and Gandhi held talks for more than two hours after an ornate welcoming ceremony, the first of its kind for the Afghan leader because India is one of the few countries outside the Soviet Bloc to recognize his government.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Najibullah restored citizenship to exiled former King Zahir Shah and 22 members of his family, Kabul Radio said. The broadcast, monitored in the Pakistani capital, Islamabad, said the Soviet-backed president had repealed a 1978 decree depriving the former royal family members of their citizenship.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
With the last Soviet troops about to leave Afghanistan, the Bush Administration has decided to press for the replacement of the Soviet-backed Najibullah regime in Kabul as quickly as possible, U.S. officials said Saturday.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Soviet Union offered Afghanistan military support during a coup attempt in Kabul last week, but the Communist government turned down the aid, President Najibullah said. He also said that two days before the failed takeover, he suspected that the defense minister, Shahnawaz Tanai, was plotting a coup and offered him the presidency. "It is yours if you think you can rule," Najibullah said. Tanai fled to Pakistan after the coup failed but is now believed to be back in Afghanistan.
NEWS
May 30, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
President Najibullah on Sunday convened Afghanistan's first Parliament in 15 years with a call for U.S.-backed Muslim rebels to lay down their arms and take legislative seats held open for them. However, in a 20-minute speech that was interrupted several times by applause, he said he will not concede any territory to the rebels, who have been fighting his Soviet-backed government since 1978. "We are ready to listen to the views of the opposition," Najibullah said.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
President Najibullah of Afghanistan offered an emotional farewell Monday to departing Soviet troops, then appealed to 4 million Afghan refugees in Pakistan and Iran to come home. "Come back to your beautiful country," Najibullah urged the refugees. "Return to your families. All necessary conditions have been provided for your normal life." Najibullah spoke at a festive ceremony on the outskirts of Kabul, the Afghan capital.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2009 | Tina Susman
An Afghan immigrant charged with conspiring to bomb U.S. targets in an attack possibly intended to coincide with the Sept. 11 anniversary pleaded not guilty in federal court Tuesday. Najibullah Zazi of Aurora, Colo., was ordered held without bail in what authorities have called the first Al Qaeda-linked plot on U.S. soil since the 2001 attacks. He appeared beside his attorney, wearing orange sneakers, black trousers and a tunic. Zazi, 24, his heavy beard neatly trimmed, did not speak, and there were no family members in the packed courthouse.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2009 | DeeDee Correll
A federal judge today ordered that an Afghan-born Denver man remain in custody as he faces a charge that he conspired to use weapons of mass destruction in the United States. Najibullah Zazi, 24, was indicted Thursday by a federal grand jury in New York for allegedly plotting to detonate bombs somewhere in the U.S. Also today, Magistrate Judge Craig Shaffer dismissed a charge against Zazi of making false statements to authorities, thus clearing the way for the suspect to be transferred to New York to face the terrorism charge.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2009 | Josh Meyer and Tina Susman
A federal grand jury in New York indicted a Denver man on a terrorism charge Thursday after federal authorities alleged that he and possibly three others had gone on a buying spree of bomb-making chemicals and were preparing an attack on U.S. soil. The one-count indictment alleges that Najibullah Zazi, 24, worked for more than a year on a plot to detonate a weapon of mass destruction. Justice Department documents did not name the alleged co-conspirators, but said that three other Denver-area residents had bought unusual amounts of chemicals from beauty-supply stores, including hydrogen peroxide and acetone, which can be used to make explosives.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2009 | Josh Meyer
Federal authorities arrested a Denver-area airport shuttle driver, his father and another man late Saturday in connection with a suspected plot to launch a terrorist attack within the United States, the Justice Department said early today. Najibullah Zazi, 24, and his father, Wali Mohammed Zazi, 53, were taken into custody at their home in Aurora, Colo., and charged with "knowingly and willfully making false statements to the FBI in a matter involving international and domestic terrorism" during several days of questioning, according to a federal complaint.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2009 | DeeDee Correll, Correll writes for The Times.
Najibullah Zazi, 24, drives passengers to and from Denver International Airport for a living. He has also worked at a fast-food restaurant and sold coffee and doughnuts, said his attorney, describing Zazi as a hardworking immigrant who hopes to become an American citizen, not a bomb-making terrorist suspect with a possible link to Al Qaeda. FBI agents questioned Zazi on Wednesday and Thursday and executed search warrants at his apartment in the Denver suburb of Aurora, as well as the nearby home of his aunt.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Afghan government troops fled their bunkers and posts under cover of darkness, the Taliban militia early today overran the capital, Kabul, hanged the former pro-Soviet leader, Najibullah, and proclaimed the creation of a strict Islamic state. After two days of heavy fighting that left hundreds dead around the war-devastated city, the rebels met little resistance as they rolled into Kabul about 1 a.m. in tanks and on foot from several directions, reports said.
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The last Soviet soldier left this besieged capital city Sunday, Soviet media reported, and President Najibullah vowed that his fragile government will not succumb to the rebel onslaught expected after the Soviets complete their withdrawal. In a report monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp. in London, Moscow Radio quoted today's edition of the Communist Party newspaper Pravda as reporting that "on Sunday, the last Soviet soldier left Kabul."
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The younger brother of Afghanistan's President Najibullah, in his first public appearance since defecting to the anti-government guerrillas last year, charged Monday that his brother is "a murderer, a liar and weak puppet" who will fall soon after the Soviets complete their troop withdrawal early next year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|