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Najibullah

NEWS
May 4, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing the gray leisure suit and smile of a suburban politician, Afghanistan's President Najibullah warned Friday of "catastrophic consequences" for his nation if the U.S. Congress continues arming and funding the moujahedeen resistance in a vote scheduled for later this month. Asserting that the current spring "fighting season" has already caused unprecedented death and destruction, the Afghan strongman appealed for a new era in U.S.
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NEWS
March 7, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hard-line factions in the Afghan military Tuesday staged a daring coup attempt against President Najibullah, bombing his palace, battling loyal soldiers in the streets and surrounding the Soviet Embassy with tanks, but the Afghan president announced hours later on state-run radio that the coup had failed.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Appealing to all Afghans to "refrain from revenge," the U.N. envoy trying to broker an urgent peace in the country said Monday that regime leaders and Muslim guerrillas massed outside the capital are moving closer to compromise. But he stressed that the safe departure of ousted dictator Najibullah is "part and parcel" of any interim agreement to fill Afghanistan's power vacuum.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flanked by dozens of submachine gunners in business suits in a decaying movie theater surrounded by tanks and soldiers, Afghan President Najibullah took the stage this week to convince the world that his harsh, Soviet-backed regime has seen the light of democracy.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Najibullah, one of the world's last Soviet-backed totalitarian leaders, says he has no intention of stepping down, despite the fall of the hard-liners in the Kremlin and the KGB who put him in power and the imminent prospect of an end to his arms supplies from Moscow.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | From Reuters
Afghan rebels turned a reconciliation ceremony into a massacre Friday, killing two generals and wounding many other government officials, witnesses said. Foreign journalists and East Bloc diplomats dived for cover as a group of rebels suddenly opened up with automatic weapons at the surrender ceremony in northwestern Afghanistan.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Afghan President Najibullah proposed that the United Nations supervise local elections as a step toward ending the nation's 11-year civil war. Najibullah said he will set a date for what he called free, direct elections so that all political forces can gauge their popular support. While the president was speaking, Pakistan-based moujahedeen rebels said they had launched a tank-backed attack on Gardez, Najibullah's hometown.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | Associated Press
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Afghanistan's president, Najibullah, met Thursday for talks, the official Soviet news agency Tass reported. Najibullah had been reported on vacation in the Soviet Union. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze also joined the talks. Najibullah told Gorbachev and Shevardnadze that his government is trying to bring a peaceful end to his nation's civil war and said Afghanistan is moving toward normalization and reconciliation, Tass said.
NEWS
August 21, 1989
An Afghan general who was in charge of President Najibullah's personal security force has defected to the rebel side, and he said that the country's Marxist regime is weak and could soon fall. "If the Russians cut off all supplies to (Najibullah), he'd be finished in two or three months," Maj. Gen. Mohammed Farouk Zarif told a news conference in Peshawar, Pakistan.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | Associated Press
The Tass press agency today quoted Afghan leader Najibullah as saying Soviet troops could withdraw from his country in 12 months or less. According to the Tass report from Kabul, the Afghan capital, Najibullah said he hoped the next round of U.N.-sponsored peace talks with Pakistan in Geneva would be the last. An estimated 115,000 Soviet soldiers are in Afghanistan to support Najibullah's pro-Soviet Communist government. Soviet troops entered Afghanistan in December, 1979.
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