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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Nam June Paik, a pioneering video artist who used television sets and electronic moving images as raw material and turned the notion of media overload into an aesthetic tour de force, has died. He was 74. The Korean-born artist had used a wheelchair since 1996, when he suffered a stroke that paralyzed his left side. He died Sunday night of natural causes at his home in Miami. A mischievous free spirit who loved spectacles, Paik blazed a trail from avant-garde music to electronic art.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Nam June Paik and Allan Kaprow have not been forgotten. Two Southern California institutions will celebrate the artists' lives and legacies this week at multimedia memorial tributes. Paik, a pioneering video and performance artist who died in January at 73, will be honored with an evening of remembrances, performances and video works at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Theater from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993 | JOHN HOWELL, John Howell is a free-lance writer based in New York.
Nam June Paik is late, very late, for an afternoon lunch meeting. So late that his assistant leaves the SoHo restaurant to see if the artist is still at his studio just around the corner. "It's pretty early for him," the assistant says apologetically on his way out. "He works all night. But he should be up for his breakfast by now." After a week of postponed appointments, the odds are still good that he will show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Nam June Paik, a pioneering video artist who used television sets and electronic moving images as raw material and turned the notion of media overload into an aesthetic tour de force, has died. He was 74. The Korean-born artist had used a wheelchair since 1996, when he suffered a stroke that paralyzed his left side. He died Sunday night of natural causes at his home in Miami. A mischievous free spirit who loved spectacles, Paik blazed a trail from avant-garde music to electronic art.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Billed as the first presentation of Nam June Paik's work in Orange County, the small exhibition that opened recently at the Newport Harbor Art Museum will be more than familiar to anyone who has seen Paik's video sculptures at the Dorothy Goldeen Gallery in Santa Monica. Three of the four sculptures in Newport--including the 1981 edition of the marvelous and provocative "TV Clock" that the artist originally made in 1963--have been lent by the gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1990 | KEVIN ALLMAN
PHONES, CLOCKS, AND VIDEOTAPE: Santa Monica's Dorothy Goldeen Gallery continues an exhibit that opened Jan. 6 of several works by video artist and sculptor Nam June Paik. One of the most elaborate pieces, "Alexander Graham Bell," is a fanciful tribute to the inventor of the telephone, constructed of found television and radio cabinets with modern video screens implanted.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Nam June Paik, the Korean video artist who uses television sets like others employ oils or bronze, has finally arrived in Los Angeles with a major exhibition of his technological wizardry. As expected, the show is an ambitious, eye-popping affair that includes more than 100 TVs, dead and alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Nam June Paik and Allan Kaprow have not been forgotten. Two Southern California institutions will celebrate the artists' lives and legacies this week at multimedia memorial tributes. Paik, a pioneering video and performance artist who died in January at 73, will be honored with an evening of remembrances, performances and video works at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Theater from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday.
BOOKS
October 25, 1987 | Charles Solomon
DIGITAL VISIONS: COMPUTERS AND ART by Cynthia Goodman (Abrams: $29.95, hardcover; $19.95, paperback; illustrated; 176 pp.). Cynthia Goodman enthusiastically asserts that computers have irrevocably altered the creation and perception of art in the 20th Century but offers only slight evidence to support her claims. Most of the works in the illustrations, which form a traveling exhibit, are more impressive technically than aesthetically.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1986
All events are in the Mandeville Center unless otherwise specified. MAIN EVENTS: April 29-30, Auditorium, 8 p.m.: "Vis-a-Vis" by Cage-Takemitsu-(The), performed by (The). May 2, Auditorium, 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Billed as the first presentation of Nam June Paik's work in Orange County, the small exhibition that opened recently at the Newport Harbor Art Museum will be more than familiar to anyone who has seen Paik's video sculptures at the Dorothy Goldeen Gallery in Santa Monica. Three of the four sculptures in Newport--including the 1981 edition of the marvelous and provocative "TV Clock" that the artist originally made in 1963--have been lent by the gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993 | JOHN HOWELL, John Howell is a free-lance writer based in New York.
Nam June Paik is late, very late, for an afternoon lunch meeting. So late that his assistant leaves the SoHo restaurant to see if the artist is still at his studio just around the corner. "It's pretty early for him," the assistant says apologetically on his way out. "He works all night. But he should be up for his breakfast by now." After a week of postponed appointments, the odds are still good that he will show.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1990 | KEVIN ALLMAN
PHONES, CLOCKS, AND VIDEOTAPE: Santa Monica's Dorothy Goldeen Gallery continues an exhibit that opened Jan. 6 of several works by video artist and sculptor Nam June Paik. One of the most elaborate pieces, "Alexander Graham Bell," is a fanciful tribute to the inventor of the telephone, constructed of found television and radio cabinets with modern video screens implanted.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Nam June Paik, the Korean video artist who uses television sets like others employ oils or bronze, has finally arrived in Los Angeles with a major exhibition of his technological wizardry. As expected, the show is an ambitious, eye-popping affair that includes more than 100 TVs, dead and alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2000
* Theater. The world premiere of Robert Glaudini's play of seduction, "The Poison Tree," opens next Thursday at 8 p.m. at the Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles, playing Tuesdays-Saturdays at 8 p.m.; Sundays at 7:30 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. through July 16. $29 to $42. (213) 628-2772. * Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2000
What's happening the next few weeks: * Songwriter Steve Schalchlin, left, performs songs and stories from his L.A. Drama Critics Circle Award-winning show, "Living in the Bonus Round," Wednesday in Campbell Hall at UC Santa Barbara. (805) 893-3535. * The Ensemble Theatre Company presents the West Coast premiere of Barbara Lebow's "Trains," two related one-act plays. Tuesday-Saturday, 8 p.m. Sunday, 2 and 7 p.m. Through May 7. (805) 962-8606.
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