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Names Project Organization

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October 4, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
They're bringing the Quilt back to Washington. Again. When the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt was first laid out on the Capitol Mall in October, 1987, during the mammoth National March for Lesbian and Gay Rights, its 1,920 panels covered a space larger than two football fields. Conceived two years before in San Francisco by activist Cleve Jones, who wanted a way to publicly eulogize a friend, the quilt had grown with dizzying speed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
A feeling of sadness overcame Cal State Northridge student Lien Huynh as she viewed a 12-by-12-foot portion of the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt through a glass display case in the lobby of Sierra Hall on campus. "That one with the picture is very depressing," said Huynh, 21, a senior sociology major, as she pointed to a section of the quilt with a photo of an AIDS victim who died at the age of 32.
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NEWS
October 10, 1992 | From Associated Press
As rain dripped from umbrellas and soaked the ground near the base of the Washington Monument on Friday, relays of volunteers read the names of thousands of Americans who have died of AIDS. Nearby, laid out over nearly 15 acres of the grassy monument grounds, a grid of walkways awaited the unfolding of the 21,000 panels of the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, each decorated panel representing a person who has died of the disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
Two 12-square-foot sections from the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt are on display through Wednesday at City Hall to commemorate the sixth annual World AIDS Day on Dec. 1. The sections are part of the nationwide quilt project that has generated more than 23,000 individual quilts. The quilts are then stitched into panels and displayed across the county. Included in the project is a quilt square for Bill Tynes, son of longtime City Councilman John O. Tynes and his wife, Clairee.
NEWS
July 25, 1989
After Columbus Day, the Names Project will scale back its national display of quilts that serves as a personal memorial to those who have died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, a spokesman for the organization said. "We will be going into senior citizen centers, classrooms and to people at risk but who have yet to come to terms with AIDS, and let the quilt do what it does, which is to reach people on a personal level," said Names Project spokesman Dan Sauro.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
Two 12-square-foot sections from the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt are on display through Wednesday at City Hall to commemorate the sixth annual World AIDS Day on Dec. 1. The sections are part of the nationwide quilt project that has generated more than 23,000 individual quilts. The quilts are then stitched into panels and displayed across the county. Included in the project is a quilt square for Bill Tynes, son of longtime City Councilman John O. Tynes and his wife, Clairee.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1992 | CONNIE PASSALACQUA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of TV's daytime soap operas, which daily feature characters having romances amid a backdrop of froth and fantasy, today injects a taste of bitter reality. Today and Monday, ABC's "One Life to Life" (which airs weekdays at 1 p.m. on Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42) rolls out eight sections of the Names Project AIDS Quilt as a conclusion to a summer-long plot examining homophobia and a teen character's public declaration that he is gay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1991 | NANCY WRIDE
"I Alone" was all it said. But for its pure starkness, the coffin-sized patchwork, spray-painted on a sheet by a dying person, stood out Friday among the pieces of a huge quilt memorializing AIDS victims worldwide. From such simple farewells to intricately sewn tomes about lost loved ones, 666 quilt panels went on exhibit for the first full day Friday at UC Irvine's Student Center, where scores of people paid an emotional visit.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | DIANNE KLEIN
They are strangers of about the same middle age. One wears Bermuda shorts, and a camera hangs from his neck. He looks for all the world like a tourist who is lost. The other is neat, his slacks pressed, his mustache trimmed. Crows feet suggest a life of hard laughs. Looking at the two of them, I would have guessed, stupidly, wrongly, that their paths might converge only in a traffic lane, and even then, that they would not turn their heads for a glance as they pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
A feeling of sadness overcame Cal State Northridge student Lien Huynh as she viewed a 12-by-12-foot portion of the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt through a glass display case in the lobby of Sierra Hall on campus. "That one with the picture is very depressing," said Huynh, 21, a senior sociology major, as she pointed to a section of the quilt with a photo of an AIDS victim who died at the age of 32.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For six months they have been working to sum up the life of a loved one on a piece of cloth. They will hand over those patches of cloth, adorned with photographs, jewelry and messages of love, so they can become part of the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, a portion of which will be in the Antelope Valley on Nov. 14-16.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | DIANNE KLEIN
They are strangers of about the same middle age. One wears Bermuda shorts, and a camera hangs from his neck. He looks for all the world like a tourist who is lost. The other is neat, his slacks pressed, his mustache trimmed. Crows feet suggest a life of hard laughs. Looking at the two of them, I would have guessed, stupidly, wrongly, that their paths might converge only in a traffic lane, and even then, that they would not turn their heads for a glance as they pass.
NEWS
October 10, 1992 | From Associated Press
As rain dripped from umbrellas and soaked the ground near the base of the Washington Monument on Friday, relays of volunteers read the names of thousands of Americans who have died of AIDS. Nearby, laid out over nearly 15 acres of the grassy monument grounds, a grid of walkways awaited the unfolding of the 21,000 panels of the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, each decorated panel representing a person who has died of the disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
They're bringing the Quilt back to Washington. Again. When the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt was first laid out on the Capitol Mall in October, 1987, during the mammoth National March for Lesbian and Gay Rights, its 1,920 panels covered a space larger than two football fields. Conceived two years before in San Francisco by activist Cleve Jones, who wanted a way to publicly eulogize a friend, the quilt had grown with dizzying speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1992 | CONNIE PASSALACQUA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of TV's daytime soap operas, which daily feature characters having romances amid a backdrop of froth and fantasy, today injects a taste of bitter reality. Today and Monday, ABC's "One Life to Life" (which airs weekdays at 1 p.m. on Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42) rolls out eight sections of the Names Project AIDS Quilt as a conclusion to a summer-long plot examining homophobia and a teen character's public declaration that he is gay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1991 | NANCY WRIDE
"I Alone" was all it said. But for its pure starkness, the coffin-sized patchwork, spray-painted on a sheet by a dying person, stood out Friday among the pieces of a huge quilt memorializing AIDS victims worldwide. From such simple farewells to intricately sewn tomes about lost loved ones, 666 quilt panels went on exhibit for the first full day Friday at UC Irvine's Student Center, where scores of people paid an emotional visit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For six months they have been working to sum up the life of a loved one on a piece of cloth. They will hand over those patches of cloth, adorned with photographs, jewelry and messages of love, so they can become part of the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, a portion of which will be in the Antelope Valley on Nov. 14-16.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Cleve Jones concedes that it was a "dingbat" idea--rectangles of fabric bearing the names of the dead joined together to form an enormous quilt. " . . . I said to myself we need a memorial," he remembers. "Then when the word quilt went into my brain, what I remembered was my grandmother tucking me in with this quilt that was made by my great-great-grandmother and has been repaired by various grandmothers and great-aunts over the years.
NEWS
July 25, 1989
After Columbus Day, the Names Project will scale back its national display of quilts that serves as a personal memorial to those who have died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, a spokesman for the organization said. "We will be going into senior citizen centers, classrooms and to people at risk but who have yet to come to terms with AIDS, and let the quilt do what it does, which is to reach people on a personal level," said Names Project spokesman Dan Sauro.
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