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Namibia Elections

NEWS
November 2, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Africa said hundreds of Namibian guerrillas have crossed into Namibia from Angola in the past week. Calling it a "grave threat" to U.N.-supervised Namibian independence elections scheduled for next week, Pretoria said it has put its troops on alert in the South-African controlled territory.
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NEWS
September 15, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Sam Nujoma, the black nationalist leader of Namibia's guerrillas, returned home Thursday after 30 years in exile to the tumultuous welcome of thousands amid heightened fears that his life is in danger. Only two days after Nujoma's most senior white adviser was assassinated, apparently by right-wing extremists, Nujoma stepped down from a chartered Boeing 767 jet to lead his South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) in U.N.
NEWS
July 3, 1989 | From Reuters
Rebel leaders on Sunday unveiled their plan for Namibia's independence election, toning down their Marxist heritage to placate the fears of foreign business interests in the South African-ruled territory. The South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO), which fought a 23-year guerrilla war against Pretoria's rule over Namibia, presented its election plan before thousands of cheering spectators at a rally in Windhoek's black township.
NEWS
June 12, 1989
Hundreds of Angolans are fleeing into neighboring Namibia to escape fighting between right-wing rebels and Angolan government troops, a Namibian government spokesman said. Up to 700 Angolans were reported to have entered northern Namibia, causing a major headache for U.N. officials, who are preparing to repatriate thousands of Namibians after years of exile. An international airlift of Namibian refugees starts today, the latest stage in the colony's U.N.-organized transition to independence from South Africa.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
South Africa warned today that Namibian independence elections will have to be postponed because of a raging bush war and canceled talks about the vote with U.N. officials. Pretoria's senior representative in Namibia, Administrator-General Louis Pienaar, told a news conference that incursions by guerrillas of the South-West Africa People's Organization have jeopardized the possibility of holding the elections on schedule in November.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Namibia, South Africa's vast colony for 74 years, began its long-delayed march to independence today under the supervision of the largest and most expensive U.N. peacekeeping mission in history. "The people of Namibia have waited long years for this day, and it is the eve of an era: an era of all of the people of Namibia," Martti Ahtisaari, the U.N.'s special representative to Namibia, said Friday as he arrived to monitor the transition from African colony to nationhood.
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