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NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of jubilant supporters in Namibia's capital, Windhoek, celebrated the runaway victories of President Sam Nujoma and his ruling party in the South African nation's third democratic election. With most of the ballots counted, the South-West African People's Organization, or SWAPO, had 77% of the vote. Nujoma, 70, also took 77% of the presidential ballot in winning a third term.
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NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of jubilant supporters in Namibia's capital, Windhoek, celebrated the runaway victories of President Sam Nujoma and his ruling party in the South African nation's third democratic election. With most of the ballots counted, the South-West African People's Organization, or SWAPO, had 77% of the vote. Nujoma, 70, also took 77% of the presidential ballot in winning a third term.
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NEWS
February 17, 1989
The U.N. Security Council gave unanimous approval to an independence plan designed to free Namibia from 74 years of South African rule, and it dispatched the first U.N. peacekeepers to the region. "The decision . . . marks the last major step toward decolonization," said Ambassador Jal Pratap Rana of Nepal, Security Council president for February. "We look forward to welcoming Namibia as a fellow member of this family of nations before long."
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South African army ran a multimillion-dollar covert scheme, code-named Operation Agree, to prop up its political friends during 1989 elections in Namibia and smear the favored South-West Africa People's Organization, a former military agent said Friday.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
The General Assembly on Wednesday approved $416 million for the U.N. peacekeeping mission to help free Namibia from 74 years of South African rule. On April 1, the United Nations is to begin implementing a one-year plan to create the world's newest independent nation, thus settling the last major colonial problem in Africa. South Africa has run Namibia, or South-West Africa, since World War I, when it captured the former German colony.
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | From United Press International
The South African-appointed government of Namibia declared the U.N. timetable for the territory's independence effectively suspended Friday, citing a week of fierce border clashes between guerrillas and security forces that killed more than 280 people. Officials said more paramilitary troops had been activated to guard against reported guerrilla movements on farmland owned by whites. They said a curfew would be reimposed on the northern Ovambo region where the fighting erupted.
NEWS
September 12, 1989
Two top-ranking officials of the South-West Africa People's Organization returned to Namibia from exile in Angola. They are expected to be joined later in the week by Sam Nujoma, leader of the once-outlawed guerrilla movement. Secretary General Andimba Toivo ja Toivo and national chairman David Meroro arrived at Windhoek on a flight from Luanda. "Home, sweet home," Ja Toivo said after kissing the tarmac. "It is very sweet to be back."
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sam Nujoma took the oath as president of this newborn nation today, it marked the end of a personal battle for liberation that began almost exactly 30 years ago when the rebel leader slipped out of the territory to launch a bush war against South African colonialists. Nujoma, a stocky man of 60 years with a thick white beard, has been called uneducated and ruthless by his opponents and a kindly man of the people by his supporters.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Hein van Heerden's hands are caked with this land's soil, his face browned by its sun, and every South African rand he has ever made is tied up in a chunk of rugged terrain stretching gloriously beyond his sight. He feels safe, living behind 10-foot wire fences and carrying semi-automatic weapons to protect his family from the black rebels who could be hiding among the thick, prickly trees.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From United Press International
The constituent assembly unanimously adopted a new constitution for the territory Friday, opening the way for independence for Africa's last colony next month. The constitution was agreed on by all 72 members of the assembly at an open-air ceremony on the steps of the colonial Tintenpalast administration building. "Now, therefore, we the people of Namibia accept and adopt this constitution as the fundamental law of our sovereign and independent republic," assembly Chairman Hage Geingob said.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Namibia joined the United Nations on Monday as its 160th member state and promised, as a small nation, to do "do our little bit" toward maintaining world peace. The admission of the former German colony, ruled by South Africa for the past 75 years, coincided with the opening of a five-day special session of the General Assembly called to seek ways to lift the burden of poverty and a $1.3-trillion debt from the developing world.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | Reuters
Tens of thousands of Namibians took to the streets Wednesday in a riot of pomp, color and pageantry to celebrate their nation's independence. The world's newest nation, which became the 160th member of the United Nations, launched a massive street party to mark the end of colonial domination, first by imperial Germany and since 1915 by neighboring South Africa. President Sam Nujoma and his Cabinet were installed by U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Namibia ended four decades of Pretoria-imposed apartheid and white colonial rule Wednesday, South Africans watched closely what many think could be a dress rehearsal for their own country's impending march away from racial segregation and black oppression.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sam Nujoma took the oath as president of this newborn nation today, it marked the end of a personal battle for liberation that began almost exactly 30 years ago when the rebel leader slipped out of the territory to launch a bush war against South African colonialists. Nujoma, a stocky man of 60 years with a thick white beard, has been called uneducated and ruthless by his opponents and a kindly man of the people by his supporters.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk, ending 75 years of often bloody colonial rule over this desert territory, ordered the lowering of his nation's flag early today, and the new blue, red and green colors of Namibia were run up the flagpole, establishing the world's newest nation. "The independence of Namibia marks the beginning of a new era for the whole of southern Africa," De Klerk declared before South African soldiers lowered the flag.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Sam Nujoma, a former guerrilla leader who spent 30 years in exile, was elected Namibia's first president Friday and will take office when the territory wins independence from South Africa on March 21. Nujoma, 60, helped found the South-West Africa People's Organization in 1960 and led it through a 23-year guerrilla war against South African rule of Namibia, Africa's last colony.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A black tailor named Helmut Hamwaama awoke before dawn Tuesday, eager for his first glimpse of one-man, one-vote democracy. But when he arrived at his local polling station in this township, the line of like-minded men in work clothes and women carrying babies already stretched half a mile down the dusty road. After a six-hour wait, Hamwaama presented his registration card to U.N. officials.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Sam Nujoma, a former guerrilla leader who spent 30 years in exile, was elected Namibia's first president Friday and will take office when the territory wins independence from South Africa on March 21. Nujoma, 60, helped found the South-West Africa People's Organization in 1960 and led it through a 23-year guerrilla war against South African rule of Namibia, Africa's last colony.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From United Press International
The constituent assembly unanimously adopted a new constitution for the territory Friday, opening the way for independence for Africa's last colony next month. The constitution was agreed on by all 72 members of the assembly at an open-air ceremony on the steps of the colonial Tintenpalast administration building. "Now, therefore, we the people of Namibia accept and adopt this constitution as the fundamental law of our sovereign and independent republic," assembly Chairman Hage Geingob said.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist guerrillas, who entered politics after a 23-year war for independence from South Africa, captured a 57% majority in a U.N.-sponsored national election Tuesday, giving them an important but not decisive say in drawing up a new constitution. Several hundred supporters of the South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO), which had waged one of Africa's longest and bloodiest liberation struggles, danced merrily on Kaiser Street in downtown Windhoek as news of the election results spread.
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