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Namibia

NEWS
February 7, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The soldiers appeared on the road out of nowhere and began shooting. The oncoming minibus swerved left, then right. The driver stopped and ran for his life. Theodora Chizabulyo, 16, was seated next to her aunt, Noreen Kwala, who pushed her and two school friends to the floor. The woman then crept on top of them. "Don't cry," whispered Kwala. "Keep quiet and pretend to be dead." Theodora felt the sting of hot lead in her back. She held her breath. The men grabbed everything.
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NEWS
December 25, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations estimates that nearly 7 million Africans have fled their homes because of a dozen armed conflicts raging across the continent, most of them over contentious territorial issues. Little noticed amid the crises has been the quiet resolution this month of a decade-long border dispute between this southern African country and its neighbor Namibia.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | TOM COHEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this harsh corner of southwestern Africa live black people with white feet. Shimmering heat and an unrelenting sun conspire to parch earth and rock, creating a choking dust that coats all the eye can see, including the feet of the Himba. A tribe of several thousand herders, the Himba exist as their ancestors did on the barren plains around the Cunene River.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Officials investigating a suspected midair collision off Namibia between German and U.S. military planes said Thursday that they had identified the only victim found so far. The body of German flight attendant Saskia Neumeyer, 43, was found Tuesday in the waters off the Skeleton Coast of this southern African nation. Neumeyer was one of 24 people on board the German Tupolev 154, which is believed to have collided Saturday with a U.S.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Officials investigating a suspected midair collision off Namibia between German and U.S. military planes said that they had identified the only victim found so far. The body of German flight attendant Saskia Neumeyer, 43, was found Tuesday in the waters off the Skeleton Coast of this southwest African nation. She was one of 24 people on board the German Tupolev 154, which is believed to have collided Saturday with a U.S. C-141 military plane carrying nine people over the south Atlantic.
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | Reuters
Thousands of seals will be clubbed to death along Namibia's Atlantic coast next week--their genitals will be sold for sex potions in Asia, their pelts will be sold to European furriers and their bones will be crushed for fertilizer. Despite protests by animal rights campaigners, the Namibian government said this week it has given the go-ahead for the annual cull of more than 19,000 seals, of which about 13,200 are pups. The Namibian seal colonies are among the largest in the world.
NEWS
May 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
Miss USA, a 21-year-old college student whose national costume honored the right of women to vote in her home country, was chosen Miss Universe 1995 early today. Chelsi Smith, of Deer Park, Tex., won over 81 other contestants in the first Miss Universe pageant held in Africa. It was broadcast to more than 600 million viewers worldwide. Smith put her hands to her face and began crying when her victory was announced.
TRAVEL
February 26, 1995
Regarding Sharri Whiting Shaw's story on Namibia ("High-Contrast Africa," Jan. 22): Readers interested in buying ivory akipas (old carved buttons) should remember that since 1990, all imports of elephant parts, including raw or carved ivory (old or new), have been banned into the United States. Because of the ivory ban, the killing of elephants has dropped dramatically in Namibia and elsewhere. Anyone trying to bring ivory items into the U.S. is subject to big fines and the ivory will be confiscated by customs agents.
TRAVEL
January 22, 1995 | SHARRI WHITING SHAW, Shaw is an American writer based in southern Africa. and
It is a land of unlimited vistas and boundless open spaces, where miles of savanna stretch as far as the eye can see. Where blue mountains and an ocean of red sand dunes border the incredible, bleak beauty of what is thought to be the world's oldest desert. And, where hundreds of species of birds and animals outnumber by far the sparse population of humans. For independent travelers who want to go to Africa, Namibia is the ideal setting for a two- or three-week driving trip.
NEWS
December 13, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An utterly peaceful two-day election in Namibia last week capped a year of astonishing democratic and economic gains in southern Africa, a long-blighted region that now offers dramatic hope for a crippled continent. In Namibia's first post-independence election, the incumbent president, Sam Nujoma, and his ruling party, the South-West Africa People's Organization, or SWAPO, swept nearly 72% of the vote in the former South African colony, a sparsely populated nation twice the size of California.
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