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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2012
What Oscar-winning actor was Ronald Reagan's best man when he married Nancy Davis in 1952? William Holden
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NATIONAL
July 10, 2013 | Rick Rojas
Thousands filled an arena, firetrucks from around the country flanked the streets, crowds stood in a parking lot under a blazing sun -- all gathered to honor the 19 firefighters killed as they battled the fast-moving Yarnell Hill fire. "Today, I think of them not as having fallen, but rather as having risen, risen far above any of us to a place of peace and comfort," said Marlin Kuykendall, mayor of Prescott, where the firefighters were based. In a ceremony Tuesday marked by tears, silence and bursts of heartfelt applause, the families of those killed were presented American and Arizona flags, as well as a bronzed Pulaski, the special ax-like tool used by wildland firefighters.
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NEWS
November 5, 1987 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
One Nancy Davis is married to the most influential man in the country, jets around the world in Air Force One and decks herself in the latest haute couture. Another Nancy Davis runs a snack bar at the Ventura harbor, wears a full-length apron and serves a tuna sandwich, named after her and garnished with onions and provolone cheese. Although their lives are pictures of disparity, their paths once crossed 35 years ago in an odd and fateful case of mistaken identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2012
What Oscar-winning actor was Ronald Reagan's best man when he married Nancy Davis in 1952? William Holden
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2003 | Ann Conway, Times Staff Writer
Celebs showcased rags by Tommy Hilfiger and the Four Tops crooned Motown, but it was an outspoken -- and angry -- Teri Garr who brought more than 1,000 guests to their feet at the 10th anniversary celebration of Race to Erase MS. Diagnosed several years ago with multiple sclerosis, she was so fearful of the prejudice toward her disease she'd tell friends, "I think I may have a touch of MS," she told the crowd gathered in the ballroom at the Century Plaza Hotel & Spa. No more.
NEWS
February 17, 1993 | SUSAN PRICE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Race to Erase MS" attracted hundreds of friends of L.A.'s Nancy Davis to Aspen over Presidents' Day weekend for a round of activities that would have tried a triathlete. Davis, a 35-year-old mother of three, pulled it off as her response to discovering that she has multiple sclerosis. Though she had worked closely with her mother, Barbara Davis, founder of the Carousel Ball, this was Nancy Davis' first solo flight as chairwoman of a major event.
MAGAZINE
June 17, 2001 | MARK EHRMAN
INVITED TO: "Race to Erase MS" gala at the Century Plaza Hotel & Spa to benefit the Nancy Davis Foundation for Multiple Sclerosis. * HOT STUFF: "I bid on a bunch of stuff I hope I don't get because I'll be really broke," says TV personality Daisy Fuentes, cruising the silent auction area wrapped in two pieces of Eduardo Lucero. Fuentes is merely one of the dozens of celebrities shuttling between the merchandise, the bar, and paying homage to the Davises (Barbara, Marvin and Nancy).
IMAGE
October 7, 2007 | Rose Apodaca
LONG before history would log her as the wife of one of the most influential U.S. presidents and him as one of this country's few true couturiers, she was just an actress under contract with a studio, and he was just a fledgling dressmaker settling into his own atelier. "I was quite young, and I used to deliver a lot of the clothes by myself," James Galanos says of those early days in 1951.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2013 | Rick Rojas
Thousands filled an arena, firetrucks from around the country flanked the streets, crowds stood in a parking lot under a blazing sun -- all gathered to honor the 19 firefighters killed as they battled the fast-moving Yarnell Hill fire. "Today, I think of them not as having fallen, but rather as having risen, risen far above any of us to a place of peace and comfort," said Marlin Kuykendall, mayor of Prescott, where the firefighters were based. In a ceremony Tuesday marked by tears, silence and bursts of heartfelt applause, the families of those killed were presented American and Arizona flags, as well as a bronzed Pulaski, the special ax-like tool used by wildland firefighters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2005 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
For this year's Race to Erase MS event at the Century Plaza Hotel, the dress code might as well have been "personal ad." The 1,300 guests were comfortable in everything from jeans to ball gowns, not to mention the occasional tiara. The random Beverly Hills princess notwithstanding, the sparkly headgear was the crowning glory of the 2005 theme for Nancy Davis' 12th annual fundraiser on April 22: "rock and royalty," perhaps fitting given Davis' aristocratic lineage in the charity world.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
A 59-year-old American missionary was shot in the head and killed in northern Mexico, possibly because one of the local drug cartels coveted her heavy-duty pickup truck, authorities said Thursday. Nancy Davis' husband, Sam, drove the bullet-riddled blue 2008 Chevrolet against traffic to the border Wednesday afternoon. He crossed the bridge into Pharr, Texas, where he told authorities that the couple had been ambushed about 70 miles south of the border on a Mexican highway by gunmen in a black pickup, according to the Pharr Police Department.
IMAGE
October 7, 2007 | Rose Apodaca
LONG before history would log her as the wife of one of the most influential U.S. presidents and him as one of this country's few true couturiers, she was just an actress under contract with a studio, and he was just a fledgling dressmaker settling into his own atelier. "I was quite young, and I used to deliver a lot of the clothes by myself," James Galanos says of those early days in 1951.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2005 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
For this year's Race to Erase MS event at the Century Plaza Hotel, the dress code might as well have been "personal ad." The 1,300 guests were comfortable in everything from jeans to ball gowns, not to mention the occasional tiara. The random Beverly Hills princess notwithstanding, the sparkly headgear was the crowning glory of the 2005 theme for Nancy Davis' 12th annual fundraiser on April 22: "rock and royalty," perhaps fitting given Davis' aristocratic lineage in the charity world.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2003 | Ann Conway, Times Staff Writer
Celebs showcased rags by Tommy Hilfiger and the Four Tops crooned Motown, but it was an outspoken -- and angry -- Teri Garr who brought more than 1,000 guests to their feet at the 10th anniversary celebration of Race to Erase MS. Diagnosed several years ago with multiple sclerosis, she was so fearful of the prejudice toward her disease she'd tell friends, "I think I may have a touch of MS," she told the crowd gathered in the ballroom at the Century Plaza Hotel & Spa. No more.
MAGAZINE
June 17, 2001 | MARK EHRMAN
INVITED TO: "Race to Erase MS" gala at the Century Plaza Hotel & Spa to benefit the Nancy Davis Foundation for Multiple Sclerosis. * HOT STUFF: "I bid on a bunch of stuff I hope I don't get because I'll be really broke," says TV personality Daisy Fuentes, cruising the silent auction area wrapped in two pieces of Eduardo Lucero. Fuentes is merely one of the dozens of celebrities shuttling between the merchandise, the bar, and paying homage to the Davises (Barbara, Marvin and Nancy).
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day Nancy Davis was told she had multiple sclerosis, she didn't feel like a lucky girl. "You're a lucky girl," she heard the doctor saying, as she sat in his office in Santa Monica, fighting back tears. What on Earth was he talking about? she wondered. He was pointing at her charcoal-colored X-rays, tracing circles around the cloud-like spots on her brain and spinal cord that were causing her hands to go numb and her vision to blur.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
A 59-year-old American missionary was shot in the head and killed in northern Mexico, possibly because one of the local drug cartels coveted her heavy-duty pickup truck, authorities said Thursday. Nancy Davis' husband, Sam, drove the bullet-riddled blue 2008 Chevrolet against traffic to the border Wednesday afternoon. He crossed the bridge into Pharr, Texas, where he told authorities that the couple had been ambushed about 70 miles south of the border on a Mexican highway by gunmen in a black pickup, according to the Pharr Police Department.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day Nancy Davis was told she had multiple sclerosis, she didn't feel like a lucky girl. "You're a lucky girl," she heard the doctor saying, as she sat in his office in Santa Monica, fighting back tears. What on Earth was he talking about? she wondered. He was pointing at her charcoal-colored X-rays, tracing circles around the cloud-like spots on her brain and spinal cord that were causing her hands to go numb and her vision to blur.
NEWS
February 17, 1993 | SUSAN PRICE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Race to Erase MS" attracted hundreds of friends of L.A.'s Nancy Davis to Aspen over Presidents' Day weekend for a round of activities that would have tried a triathlete. Davis, a 35-year-old mother of three, pulled it off as her response to discovering that she has multiple sclerosis. Though she had worked closely with her mother, Barbara Davis, founder of the Carousel Ball, this was Nancy Davis' first solo flight as chairwoman of a major event.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
One Nancy Davis is married to the most influential man in the country, jets around the world in Air Force One and decks herself in the latest haute couture. Another Nancy Davis runs a snack bar at the Ventura harbor, wears a full-length apron and serves a tuna sandwich, named after her and garnished with onions and provolone cheese. Although their lives are pictures of disparity, their paths once crossed 35 years ago in an odd and fateful case of mistaken identity.
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