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Nancy Hoover Hunter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
U. S. District Judge Earl B. Gilliam on Wednesday denied another motion for a mistrial made by Nancy Hoover Hunter's lawyers, who complained that they had just received 197 pages of documents that prosecutors should have turned over to them by last March 15. Gilliam resumed Hunter's fraud trial Wednesday after recessing it for a day Tuesday to deal with a continuing dispute between the prosecution and defense over the document issue. Prosecutors said they have now given Hunter's lawyers all notes and memoranda regarding investigators' interviews with both scheduled and potential witnesses at the trial.
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NEWS
June 11, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Nancy Hoover Hunter, the former mayor of Del Mar who was sentenced to federal prison for her role in the $80-million J. David & Co. investment fraud, has served her time behind bars and is due to be released today, authorities said. Hunter, 53, who essentially served as second-in-command at the now-defunct La Jolla investment firm, has served about 30 months of her term, originally 10 years and later cut to 6 1/2 years, officials said.
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NEWS
May 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nancy Hoover Hunter pleaded guilty to four felony counts stemming from the J. David & Co. investment fraud, finally admitting criminal involvement in the $80-million scam and bringing to an end various federal cases against her. Under a plea bargain, she pleaded guilty to two counts apiece in two separate cases. U.S. District Judge Earl B. Gilliam sentenced Hunter, 51, to 10 years in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Hoover Hunter, the former mayor of Del Mar who was sentenced to federal prison for her role in the $80-million J. David & Co. investment fraud, has served her time behind bars and is scheduled to be released today, authorities said. Hunter, 53, who essentially was second in command at the now-defunct La Jolla investment firm, has served about 30 months of her term, which originally was 10 years and was later cut to 6 1/2 years.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Nancy Hoover Hunter, the former mayor of Del Mar who was sentenced to federal prison for her role in the $80-million J. David & Co. investment fraud, has served her time behind bars and is due to be released today, authorities said. Hunter, 53, who essentially served as second-in-command at the now-defunct La Jolla investment firm, has served about 30 months of her term, originally 10 years and later cut to 6 1/2 years, officials said.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Hoover Hunter, convicted of four counts of tax evasion in connection with the J. David & Co. investment fraud, was sentenced Tuesday to 10 years in federal prison. Hunter, 51, a former top executive with the failed La Jolla investment firm, begged U.S. District Judge Earl B. Gilliam for mercy, crying and holding on to a lectern for support as she said she was "terribly sorry for all the pain and suffering I've caused."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
A secretary testified Thursday that Nancy Hoover Hunter paid her $400 to retype financial statements for J. David (Jerry) Dominelli to include altered figures about Dominelli's track record as an investor. Christine Nespor said she did the work for Hunter in 1980 while she and Hunter were working at the La Jolla office of Bache, Halsey, Stuart, Shields, an investment brokerage. At the time, Dominelli was starting up his J. David & Co. investment firm in La Jolla. Prosecutors have charged that Hunter helped Dominelli lure investors to his new firm by preparing falsified financial statements that indicated he was a highly successful broker, when in fact he had a dismal investment record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
A former bookkeeper for J. David & Co. testified Tuesday that she considered Nancy Hoover Hunter to be the second in command at the La Jolla investment firm and that Hunter met behind closed doors virtually every day with J. David (Jerry) Dominelli, the firm's founder and head. The bookkeeper, Gioia Paulk, began working for the firm in January, 1982, two years before nervous investors forced it into bankruptcy and learned of the huge Ponzi scheme, in which money from new investors was used to pay off old ones and little or no trading was done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury found Nancy Hoover Hunter, an accused participant in a major fraud scheme, guilty Monday on four counts of tax evasion and acquitted her of one other tax-related charge but could not reach a decision on the more pertinent charges against her. Hunter was accused of helping to carry out a multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme along with financier J. David Dominelli, who is serving a 20-year term in federal prison for his role as the mastermind of the fraud.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge Earl B. Gilliam on Thursday denied a motion to dismiss the indictment against Nancy Hoover Hunter, the former mayor of Del Mar who is on trial for charges stemming from the collapse of the J. David & Co. investment firm. Gilliam turned down the motion after listening to arguments by one of Hunter's lawyers, who accused prosecutors of "rampant, persistent misconduct" related to their failure to turn over documents to the defense until after the trial began last April 18. "I think the U.S. attorney's office is out of control and I think it's your responsibility to do something about it," Richard Marmaro, who represents Hunter, told Gilliam.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Hoover Hunter, the former mayor of Del Mar who ultimately admitted criminal involvement in the $80-million J. David & Co. investment fraud, testified Friday as a government witness and confessed that she lied on the stand when she was on trial two years ago. Hunter, 52, who essentially served as second-in-command at the now-defunct La Jolla investment firm, said she was admitting her lies because she hoped to win a reduction of her 10-year prison term.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nancy Hoover Hunter pleaded guilty to four felony counts stemming from the J. David & Co. investment fraud, finally admitting criminal involvement in the $80-million scam and bringing to an end various federal cases against her. Under a plea bargain, she pleaded guilty to two counts apiece in two separate cases. U.S. District Judge Earl B. Gilliam sentenced Hunter, 51, to 10 years in prison.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Hoover Hunter, convicted of four counts of tax evasion in connection with the J. David & Co. investment fraud, was sentenced Tuesday to 10 years in federal prison. Hunter, 51, a former top executive with the failed La Jolla investment firm, begged U.S. District Judge Earl B. Gilliam for mercy, crying and holding on to a lectern for support as she said she was "terribly sorry for all the pain and suffering I've caused."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury found Nancy Hoover Hunter, an accused participant in a major fraud scheme, guilty Monday on four counts of tax evasion and acquitted her of one other tax-related charge but could not reach a decision on the more pertinent charges against her. Hunter was accused of helping to carry out a multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme along with financier J. David Dominelli, who is serving a 20-year term in federal prison for his role as the mastermind of the fraud.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors in Nancy Hoover Hunter's federal tax evasion and fraud trial indicated Friday that they had reached partial verdicts but were "unable to render a complete verdict in the case." At a late-morning hearing, three of the 12 jurors told U. S. Judge Earl B. Gilliam they did not feel the panel could reach a full verdict on the 197 counts against Hunter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Hoover Hunter's trial on 197 counts of federal tax evasion and fraud went to the jury Wednesday after prosecutors and defense attorneys got one last shot at painting conflicting pictures of Hunter's role in the failed investment firm of J. David & Co. Prosecutors again urged the federal court jury to convict Hunter on all counts, saying she was a knowing participant in the J.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Hoover Hunter, the former mayor of Del Mar who ultimately admitted criminal involvement in the $80-million J. David & Co. investment fraud, testified Friday as a government witness and confessed that she lied on the stand when she was on trial two years ago. Hunter, 52, who essentially served as second-in-command at the now-defunct La Jolla investment firm, said she was admitting her lies because she hoped to win a reduction of her 10-year prison term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
Nancy Hoover Hunter was deeply in love with J. David (Jerry) Dominelli, believed he was a financial "genius," and trusted so completely in his honesty that she allowed her sister to invest $60,000 in his firm, J. David & Co., a month before it collapsed, Hunter's lawyer said Tuesday in opening arguments in her fraud trial. "She loved Jerry Dominelli. She didn't know he was a crook, and she will tell you that she didn't know he was stealing people's money," Richard Marmaro, Hunter's lawyer, told the jury in federal court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge Earl B. Gilliam on Thursday denied a motion to dismiss the indictment against Nancy Hoover Hunter, the former mayor of Del Mar who is on trial for charges stemming from the collapse of the J. David & Co. investment firm. Gilliam turned down the motion after listening to arguments by one of Hunter's lawyers, who accused prosecutors of "rampant, persistent misconduct" related to their failure to turn over documents to the defense until after the trial began last April 18. "I think the U.S. attorney's office is out of control and I think it's your responsibility to do something about it," Richard Marmaro, who represents Hunter, told Gilliam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
A secretary testified Thursday that Nancy Hoover Hunter paid her $400 to retype financial statements for J. David (Jerry) Dominelli to include altered figures about Dominelli's track record as an investor. Christine Nespor said she did the work for Hunter in 1980 while she and Hunter were working at the La Jolla office of Bache, Halsey, Stuart, Shields, an investment brokerage. At the time, Dominelli was starting up his J. David & Co. investment firm in La Jolla. Prosecutors have charged that Hunter helped Dominelli lure investors to his new firm by preparing falsified financial statements that indicated he was a highly successful broker, when in fact he had a dismal investment record.
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