Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNancy Nevins
IN THE NEWS

Nancy Nevins

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1994 | NANCY NEVINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
That sweltering Friday afternoon, Richie Havens sang, the Swami Satchedenada chanted, and then Sweetwater dealt with the squawking, archaic sound system and cranked out a sweaty 45-minute show: We were the first rock group to play at Woodstock. We were first to stumble innocently across the black cables scattered insanely around the makeshift stage, and first to struggle to maintain eye contact across the plywood expanse.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Nevins watched the movie of her life the other day. And though she thought some important things were missing--especially her singing voice--Nevins is thrilled that Sweetwater, the long-lost opening band at the original Woodstock festival, has been found again. "Sweetwater: A True Rock Story" premieres Sunday on VH1 (Review, F2). It is the first movie the rock video channel has produced. "It was so emotional.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1994
"Does anybody remember Sweetwater?" asks Nancy Nevins ("It All Started With Three Days of Peace and Music," Aug. 11). Of course we do! There are some of us around who saw the group at the Bank, or the Bitter End West, with people like Taj Mahal and Papa John Phillips. How great to have grown up in an era when a genre-bending band like Sweetwater could get record deals--and airplay! I'm glad that Sweetwater was there to open our ears to different sounds and to inspire us to make music ourselves, though I'm sorry that we've lost Sweetwater members Alan, Albert and August.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1994
"Does anybody remember Sweetwater?" asks Nancy Nevins ("It All Started With Three Days of Peace and Music," Aug. 11). Of course we do! There are some of us around who saw the group at the Bank, or the Bitter End West, with people like Taj Mahal and Papa John Phillips. How great to have grown up in an era when a genre-bending band like Sweetwater could get record deals--and airplay! I'm glad that Sweetwater was there to open our ears to different sounds and to inspire us to make music ourselves, though I'm sorry that we've lost Sweetwater members Alan, Albert and August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992 | Dana Parsons
As a late '60s rock 'n' roller, Nancy Nevins learned all about life on the road and the uncertainty of the next gig. Little did she know those same survival instincts would serve her so well in her second career in the '90s--as an English instructor in California's community college system. Yet here she finds herself--having traded in a guitar for a grade book, lecturing instead of singing--but still living professional life as a series of proverbial one-night stands.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Nevins watched the movie of her life the other day. And though she thought some important things were missing--especially her singing voice--Nevins is thrilled that Sweetwater, the long-lost opening band at the original Woodstock festival, has been found again. "Sweetwater: A True Rock Story" premieres Sunday on VH1 (Review, F2). It is the first movie the rock video channel has produced. "It was so emotional.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989
After reading Steve Hochman's article about what's become of the Woodstock musicians, a friend telephoned to ask if I knew I was missing. As lead singer of Sweetwater, I know the rock group is disbanded but definitely not missing (as Hochman indicated). After three albums and much successful, national touring, Sweetwater disbanded in 1971, and I went on to record a solo album. Shortly after, I retired from public performances due to poor health, then I married, later divorced and returned to college.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1999 | MARC WEINGARTEN
The Los Angeles band Sweetwater is the beneficiary of twice-removed nostalgia. Thirty years ago, the septet was little more than a footnote in rock, known mainly for being the opening act for the original Woodstock. After a near-fatal car accident derailed the singing career of front-woman Nancy Nevins, Sweetwater broke up for nearly three decades before reemerging in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1994
Nancy Nevins ("Group Shouldn't Snicker at Person's Pain," March 17) has my sympathy in her guilt for the peer pressure which prevented her from rushing to help a naked woman outside the store who was walking along Pacific Coast Highway. I hope these peers are likewise ashamed of their inaction upon learning the woman had been beaten and evicted by a boyfriend! I'm not sure what I would have done under similar circumstances, but my daughters worry about my safety because of my good Samaritan tendencies.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002
Older rock musicians shouldn't have to "Hang Up Their Rock 'n' Roll Shoes," to quote a song by Chuck Willis ("Hope I Play as I Get Old," by Geoff Boucher, Feb. 24). But Boucher failed to mention many of rock's first generation never made it to old age. Artists such as Buddy Holly, Eddie Cochran and Ritchie Valens died tragically at young ages. Holly was 22, Cochran 21, and Valens was 17 and only eight months and four singles into his career. Jerry Lee Lewis' rock career was damaged by scandal, so much so he changed genres.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1994 | NANCY NEVINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
That sweltering Friday afternoon, Richie Havens sang, the Swami Satchedenada chanted, and then Sweetwater dealt with the squawking, archaic sound system and cranked out a sweaty 45-minute show: We were the first rock group to play at Woodstock. We were first to stumble innocently across the black cables scattered insanely around the makeshift stage, and first to struggle to maintain eye contact across the plywood expanse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992 | Dana Parsons
As a late '60s rock 'n' roller, Nancy Nevins learned all about life on the road and the uncertainty of the next gig. Little did she know those same survival instincts would serve her so well in her second career in the '90s--as an English instructor in California's community college system. Yet here she finds herself--having traded in a guitar for a grade book, lecturing instead of singing--but still living professional life as a series of proverbial one-night stands.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
It was 20 years ago today that Nancy Nevins de Jongh walked on stage during the opening hours of Woodstock and began to sing. Over the years, the epochal festival on a farm in Upstate New York has taken on a burnished glow in rock lore: a gathering of peaceful tribes. The high-water mark of the '60s counterculture. The birth of the commercial giant and mass-media force that rock was to become.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | DAVID NELSON
Imagine that Herman Melville had rewritten "Moby Dick" every year, using its basic theme as a guide but altering its characters and tone each time so as to give the novel a different flavor. We might then also have had a comic "Moby Dick," a melodramatic "Moby Dick," a "Moby Dick" reinterpreted according to Confucian philosophy, maybe even a "Moby Dick" cookbook.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|