Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNancy Reddin Kienholz
IN THE NEWS

Nancy Reddin Kienholz

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1993 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In 1961, assemblagist Edward Kienholz completed "Roxy's," the first of what was to be an ongoing series of life-sized tableaux that established him as one of the most significant American artists of the 20th Century. Inspired by a notorious Las Vegas bordello, Kienholz's dark homage re-created Roxy's as it might have been in 1943, transforming the shabby cathouse into a bleak meditation on time, loneliness and memory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The story of Ed Kienholz's "Five Car Stud" has been something of a mystery for decades. Made in Los Angeles between 1969 and 1972, it was the last work Kienholz completed here before moving to Berlin and one of the most powerful by any measure: a searing indictment of race relations in America, told with a stroke of blunt violence as alarming today as it was the year it was made. The piece was shown, however, only in Germany before being acquired by a Japanese collector and disappearing into the vaults of the museum he would go on to found.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
One of Los Angeles' favorite social critics is back in town with more to say about the insidious presence of television and how polluted news filters into our brains. Ed Kienholz created mock TV sets from paint cans and vanity cases some years ago, as a gaggle of early works reminds us. But now he and Nancy Reddin Kienholz have updated the theme, focusing on the Iran-Contra hearings in a series of "portable TVs" called "Double Cross."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
A grotesque troupe of prostitutes--Five Dollar Billy, Miss Cherry Delight, Cockeyed Jenny, a Lady Named Zoa and Dianna Poole, Miss Universal--has moved into the Museum of Contemporary Art. Fashioned of everything from dolls, mannequins and women's underwear to a bedpan and a trash can, these sculptural figures inhabit "Roxys," a brothel-like installation in "Kienholz: A Retrospective," which opens today at the museum's California Plaza building.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
A grotesque troupe of prostitutes--Five Dollar Billy, Miss Cherry Delight, Cockeyed Jenny, a Lady Named Zoa and Dianna Poole, Miss Universal--has moved into the Museum of Contemporary Art. Fashioned of everything from dolls, mannequins and women's underwear to a bedpan and a trash can, these sculptural figures inhabit "Roxys," a brothel-like installation in "Kienholz: A Retrospective," which opens today at the museum's California Plaza building.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The story of Ed Kienholz's "Five Car Stud" has been something of a mystery for decades. Made in Los Angeles between 1969 and 1972, it was the last work Kienholz completed here before moving to Berlin and one of the most powerful by any measure: a searing indictment of race relations in America, told with a stroke of blunt violence as alarming today as it was the year it was made. The piece was shown, however, only in Germany before being acquired by a Japanese collector and disappearing into the vaults of the museum he would go on to found.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1996
Reminiscences and critical perspectives on the art of the late Ed Kienholz and his role in the local art scene will be offered during "Ed Kienholz Remembered," Nov. 2 at UCLA's Perloff Hall. The 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2012
FAMILY Using Animated Films to Make Ocean Issues Come Alive for Kids Award-winning filmmaker Brandon Strathmann presents two of his ecologically minded short films, "The Plastic Perils of the Pacific" and "Dissolving Destinies," a 3-D animated film that follows a crab through a coral reef threatened by ocean acidification. Strathmann will introduce each movie and discuss the importance of protecting the sea. Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach. 7-9 p.m. $5. (562)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2011
MUSIC Vince Gill The singer, songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist has multiple studio albums on his resume, not to mention 20 Grammys and 18 CMA Awards. Catch a display of his high, lonesome tenor voice and soul-country guitar licks during his current U.S. tour, featuring material from his latest long-player, "Guitar Slinger. " Troubadour, 9081 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood. 8 p.m. $29.99. (310) 276-6168. http://www.troubadour.com . ART Modern Art in Los Angeles: Assemblage and Politics Los Angeles artists Ed Bereal, Mel Edwards, George Herms, Nancy Reddin Kienholz and Betye Saar, who used the medium of assemblage to comment on the political climate of postwar America, will discuss the connection between art and social critique.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
When Ed Kienholz started making life-size tableaux back in the '60s, he staked out such a radical artistic position no one has caught up to him to this day. Kienholz was half philosopher and half attack-dog. He waded into the paradox and injustices of the American social myth when it was forbidden. Now that it's fashionable, other practitioners still look timid by comparison. Kienholz remains Kienholz's only competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1993 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In 1961, assemblagist Edward Kienholz completed "Roxy's," the first of what was to be an ongoing series of life-sized tableaux that established him as one of the most significant American artists of the 20th Century. Inspired by a notorious Las Vegas bordello, Kienholz's dark homage re-created Roxy's as it might have been in 1943, transforming the shabby cathouse into a bleak meditation on time, loneliness and memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
One of Los Angeles' favorite social critics is back in town with more to say about the insidious presence of television and how polluted news filters into our brains. Ed Kienholz created mock TV sets from paint cans and vanity cases some years ago, as a gaggle of early works reminds us. But now he and Nancy Reddin Kienholz have updated the theme, focusing on the Iran-Contra hearings in a series of "portable TVs" called "Double Cross."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1993 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Looking at art has, historically, often meant looking at rape, pillage, prostitution and other unsavory practices glorified in paint. Such atrocities, when reduced to two dimensions and distanced by time, usually end up providing visual experiences more than visceral ones. The option of detached observation slams shut in the face of Edward and Nancy Reddin Kienholz's environmental tableaux.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1996 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Anyone who avoids modern art museums because they seem intimidating and involuted should see "Kienholz: A Retrospective." On view at the Museum of Contemporary Art, it's an overwhelming circus parading some 100 heartfelt assemblages and life-size tableaux. They talk to everybody in the carnival-barker accents of Paul Bunyan and Billy Sunday. They dwell thoughtfully on life and death, sex and old age, the absurd and the sublime. "Check out the great American freak show!"
Los Angeles Times Articles
|