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Nancy Sutley

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NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Nancy Sutley, the top White House environmental advisor, is a fan of Wallace and Gromit, the claymation movie stars. Wallace, a tinkerer, habitually gets in trouble with his elaborate inventions, and Gromit, his silent but hyper-intelligent dog, repeatedly saves him. In her five years as head of the White House's Council on Environmental Quality, Sutley said she felt a lot like Gromit. “You know, in keeping things moving as chaos ensues,” she said. One of the longest-serving top officials in the Obama administration, Sutley winds up her tenure Friday to return to Los Angeles, where she had worked as deputy mayor for energy and environment under Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.
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NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Nancy Sutley, the top White House environmental advisor, is a fan of Wallace and Gromit, the claymation movie stars. Wallace, a tinkerer, habitually gets in trouble with his elaborate inventions, and Gromit, his silent but hyper-intelligent dog, repeatedly saves him. In her five years as head of the White House's Council on Environmental Quality, Sutley said she felt a lot like Gromit. “You know, in keeping things moving as chaos ensues,” she said. One of the longest-serving top officials in the Obama administration, Sutley winds up her tenure Friday to return to Los Angeles, where she had worked as deputy mayor for energy and environment under Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2008 | David Zahniser, Zahniser is a Times staff writer.
The behind-the-scenes bureaucrat who has been carrying out Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's environmental agenda is poised to take her work nationwide as the presumptive chair of President-elect Barack Obama's White House Council on Environmental Quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2008 | David Zahniser, Zahniser is a Times staff writer.
The behind-the-scenes bureaucrat who has been carrying out Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's environmental agenda is poised to take her work nationwide as the presumptive chair of President-elect Barack Obama's White House Council on Environmental Quality.
NEWS
December 10, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Clinton Administration, seeking to blunt a revolt in some states about new air pollution controls, has agreed to ease its requirements for more stringent and costly automobile tailpipe emissions testing. EPA Administrator Carol Browner promised a group of governors that they would be given more flexibility in meeting the new vehicle-testing regulations as long as overall pollution-reduction levels are met, officials said Friday.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2008 | Peter Nicholas, Nicholas is a writer in our Washington bureau.
President-elect Barack Obama is preparing to name Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Nancy Sutley as a top member of his environmental protection team, a Democrat familiar with the appointment said Tuesday. Sutley is to be made chairwoman of the Council on Environmental Quality, which helps coordinate and devise environmental policies for the White House. She now serves as deputy mayor for energy and environment, and is on the board of directors for the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2009 | Phil Willon
Another member of Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's senior staff is heading to Washington. On Friday, President Obama announced that he has nominated Mercedes Marquez, general manager of the city's Housing Department, to become assistant secretary for community planning and development at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. If she is confirmed by the U.S. Senate, the post would represent a reunion of sorts for Marquez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2009 | Phil Willon
One of the top law enforcement advisors to Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has been appointed an assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the third senior member of Villaraigosa's administration to head to Washington since President Obama's election. Arif Alikhan, the city's deputy mayor for homeland security and public safety, will join the federal agency's office of policy development. Alikhan, whom Villaraigosa appointed as a deputy mayor in 2006, previously worked for the U.S. Department of Justice overseeing the national computer hacking and intellectual property program.
OPINION
December 15, 2008
The current Energy secretary, Samuel W. Bodman, is a former chemical-company CEO and financial-services executive. The next one is likely to be a Nobel Prize-winning physicist who runs a national laboratory dedicated to renewable energy, next-generation biofuels and other technological solutions to global warming. If there's a clearer signal of the radical course correction we can expect under President Obama, we've yet to see it.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2010 | By Kim Geiger, Los Angeles Times
More than two decades after President Reagan had a solar water heating system removed from the White House roof, President Obama will become the first to use solar energy as a means for powering the first family's White House residence. Plans to install solar panels and a solar water heater on the roof of the White House residence were announced Tuesday by Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Nancy Sutley, who heads the Council on Environmental Quality, as part of a larger Energy Department effort to portray solar power as reliable and accessible.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley
Despite Internet reports to the contrary, White House officials say a federal task force will in no way, shape or form suggest that President Obama restrict sportfishing off America's coasts and in the Great Lakes. In recent weeks, fishing groups and bloggers across the country have raised concerns that the president's was set to impose new restrictions, or even an outright ban, on a treasured national pastime. How did this get started? The outcry was spawned by an opinion column on ESPNoutdoors.
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