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Nancye Radmin

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BUSINESS
May 21, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
Customers aren't the only people benefiting from the big emphasis on service. Nancye Radmin, owner of the Forgotten Woman chain of upscale women's apparel stores, is convinced that a good salesperson is more important than good merchandise. "You know how women say the good men are all either married or dead? Well, I feel the same about salespeople," Radmin told retailers attending the International Council of Shopping Centers spring convention last week in Las Vegas. To attract and keep the good sales people, Radmin acknowledged that she would do just about anything.
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NEWS
December 29, 1989 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Oprah Winfrey said good-by to 67 pounds last year, she also said good-by to Forgotten Woman. "She was a client," confirms Nancye Radmin, owner of the coast-to-coast chain that specializes in large-size luxuries like pleated-silk culottes, cashmere sweaters and leather suits. "I think she's the greatest thing that ever happened to the large-size woman. When she was heavier, she made it OK. And when she lost weight, she gave women hope."
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NEWS
December 29, 1989 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Oprah Winfrey said good-by to 67 pounds last year, she also said good-by to Forgotten Woman. "She was a client," confirms Nancye Radmin, owner of the coast-to-coast chain that specializes in large-size luxuries like pleated-silk culottes, cashmere sweaters and leather suits. "I think she's the greatest thing that ever happened to the large-size woman. When she was heavier, she made it OK. And when she lost weight, she gave women hope."
BUSINESS
May 21, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
Customers aren't the only people benefiting from the big emphasis on service. Nancye Radmin, owner of the Forgotten Woman chain of upscale women's apparel stores, is convinced that a good salesperson is more important than good merchandise. "You know how women say the good men are all either married or dead? Well, I feel the same about salespeople," Radmin told retailers attending the International Council of Shopping Centers spring convention last week in Las Vegas. To attract and keep the good sales people, Radmin acknowledged that she would do just about anything.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It used to be just about impossible for a woman Size 16 or larger to buy a designer-label outfit off the rack. But The Forgotten Woman, a chain of 25 stores that sells large-size women's clothing, is helping to change that. Founder and owner Nancye Radmin was in Palm Desert recently to open a new salon for top-flight designer clothing by, among others, Bob Mackie, Oscar de la Renta, Pauline Trigere, Nolan Miller, Alfred Fiandaca and Geoffrey Beene.
NEWS
September 27, 1985 | ROSE-MARIE TURK
Several months after Nancye Radmin gave birth to her second child, she went looking for cashmere sweaters, silk blouses and gabardine pants. Not an unusual shopping list, if only Radmin had been the usual shopper. But during her pregnancy, she had gone from "an Anne Klein Size 4" to a Size 16. Her search for new clothes was mortifying, she remembers. "I was laughed out of every store in New York. One saleswoman asked me: 'What does a fat woman like you want with cashmere sweaters?'
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | BETTY GOODWIN
Now that hemlines are indisputably on the rise, should women with less than perfect bodies show their kneecaps? Nancye Radmin, owner of the Forgotten Woman large-size specialty stores, thinks not. "Our dimples have to be on our faces, not on the backs of our knees," said the outspoken retailer, who recently opened her 18th shop in Newport Beach's Fashion Island. (Her Wilshire Boulevard outpost in Beverly Hills is now 8 years old.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
It was the sort of thing that doesn't happen every day. Pam Megonigal Duley was paying for two pairs of shoes at Bullock's at South Coast Plaza when she noticed that the navy blue pair she was wearing needed some polish. Where could she get her shoes shined in the mall? "The salesclerk couldn't come up with anything," Duley said. "So another guy behind the desk opened a brand-new container of shoe polish and polished my old pair," she said. "Talk about service. It was great."
NEWS
August 14, 1992 | GAILE ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lace bustiers that fit a 44 D? Sheer dresses in a Size 22? How about a Size 20 evening dress that sports a Gianni Versace label? It seems like only yesterday that women who wore a Size 14 or larger were relegated to wearing hibiscus print polyester muumuus. Not any more. The large-size business is flourishing, and women who wear Sizes 14 to 24 finally have some options when they browse through catalogues, chain stores and specialty boutiques.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | PADDY CALISTRO
Fact: Oprah Winfrey, one of daytime TV's most talked-about stars, admits that her size varies greatly--from a Size 12 up. Fact: The estimated 30 million to 40 million women in America who wear Size 16 or larger spent close to $8 billion on clothing in 1986. And fashion industry forecasters estimate that amount could triple in the next few years. Fact: Lane Bryant, a chain catering to the large-size customer, was losing money in 1982 when it was acquired by the Limited Inc.
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