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Nangarhar

WORLD
November 19, 2003 | From Associated Press
The United Nations' refugee agency is pulling its international workers out of eastern and southern Afghanistan and suspending all aid to refugees returning from Pakistan after one of its employees was killed last weekend. Filippo Grandi, head of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Afghanistan, said about 30 foreign staffers were being withdrawn, and refugee centers shut, in Nangarhar, Paktia, Khowst and Kandahar provinces.
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NEWS
May 23, 1988 | Associated Press
The last Soviet troops pulled out of the Afghan city of Jalalabad on Sunday and arrived in Kabul, the capital, the official Tass news agency reported. The move prompted speculation over an impending rebel attack. Guerrilla forces have said they would invade Jalalabad, a strategic northeastern city, once the Soviet troops were gone. Tass said withdrawal of the convoy left no Soviet troops in the province of Nangarhar, in northeast Afghanistan.
WORLD
June 19, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
The morning raid caught members of the tribal militia by surprise. By the end of the attack on the camp on a patch of desert scrub in eastern Afghanistan, 12 fighters of a group that had dared to take on the Taliban were dead. But their attackers were not Taliban militants. They were fellow Shinwari tribesmen, incensed that the militia had commandeered a swath of their land. The incident this year highlights the pitfalls of establishing militias in Afghanistan, a country marked by tribal rivalries, age-old feuds and warlords.
WORLD
June 10, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
It was supposed to have been a festive occasion: a pre-wedding party, held under the stars on a warm night. But suspected insurgent gunmen burst in on the gathering in a village field Thursday, fatally shooting nine men, including the groom, Afghan officials said. Grieving family members and provincial officials said the attack, which took place around 1 a.m. in a remote area of Afghanistan's Nangarhar province, might have been due to the fact that a relative of the targeted clan served as the district administrator.
WORLD
October 31, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Afghan President Hamid Karzai on Saturday denounced a large-scale drug raid in which U.S. forces and Russian drug agents took part, calling it a violation of Afghan sovereignty. The outburst marked the latest in a series of tense confrontations between the Afghan leader and his Western backers. It also signaled a degree of disarray within the Karzai administration, because Afghan counter-narcotics police took part in the operation, playing what U.S. officials described as the lead role.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Soviet air force pilots accidentally bombed an Afghan military post they mistook for a rebel encampment, killing about 100 soldiers two weeks ago, a Western diplomat said Tuesday. It was not the first reported accidental bombing by the Soviets, who maintain about 115,000 troops in Afghanistan to bolster Afghan troops against Muslim rebels trying to oust Kabul's Communist government.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | Associated Press
Thousands of Soviet commandos and paratroopers backed by waves of jets and helicopter gunships on Wednesday attacked Muslim guerrilla bases in eastern Afghanistan close to the Pakistani border, sources said. The major offensive came despite a cease-fire called last month by the Communist government of Afghanistan, which is backed by an estimated 115,000 Soviet troops. Guerrilla leaders rejected the cease-fire, and Western sources said Tuesday that it had collapsed.
WORLD
May 17, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
A powerful homemade bomb killed four U.S. service members Monday in southern Afghanistan, military officials said, an unusually high number of troop deaths in a single explosion. Bombs known as improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, have caused the bulk of Western combat casualties in Afghanistan, despite concerted efforts to provide better protection for troops in the field, including sophisticated mine-resistant vehicles and improved body armor. Because these homemade bombs are the weapon most favored by insurgents facing a far more powerful conventional military force, the rate of catastrophic battlefield wounds among U.S. and other Western troops is on the rise, including loss of multiple limbs and injuries to the groin.
WORLD
April 24, 2011 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
A NATO helicopter crew member was killed Saturday when the aircraft crash-landed in eastern Afghanistan, authorities said. The cause of the "hard landing" in Kapisa province was under investigation late Saturday, said Maj. Michael Johnson, a NATO forces spokesman. Johnson said he could not disclose what type of helicopter crashed or whether it was part of a larger operation in the area. Rescue forces who arrived at the crash scene were fired on by insurgents as they tried to evacuate the helicopter's two crew members, and they returned fire, according to a NATO statement.
NEWS
November 23, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one could be more delighted about the departure of the Taliban regime than the opium poppy growers here in eastern Afghanistan. In July 2000, the Taliban's leader, Mullah Mohammed Omar, issued an edict banning poppy cultivation across Afghanistan, then the world's largest producer of the flower pod used to make heroin. For years, the Taliban had used taxes on drugs to finance its military. That all changed, however, with Omar's eight-line message. According to a recent report by the U.N.
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