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Nanny State

MAGAZINE
October 24, 2004 | MARK EHRMAN
The first annual "Liberty Film Festival" gave liberal Hollywood a piece of its mind recently at the Pacific Design Center. Celebrating "the rebirth of conservative artistic expression," the three-day event showcased a slew of independently produced films aimed at evils such as gun control, moral relativism, the nanny state and the corpulent director of "Fahrenheit 9/11."
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BUSINESS
November 2, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
San Francisco's board of supervisors has voted, by a veto-proof margin, to ban most of McDonald's Happy Meals as they are now served in the restaurants. The measure will make San Francisco the first major city in the country to forbid restaurants from offering a free toy with meals that contain more than set levels of calories, sugar and fat. The ordinance would also require restaurants to provide fruits and vegetables with all meals for children that come with toys. "We're part of a movement that is moving forward an agenda of food justice," said Supervisor Eric Mar, who sponsored the measure.
NATIONAL
August 12, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
For all the Californians who thought they'd cornered the market on healthy living, meet Michael Bloomberg, the 108th mayor of New York. Since he took charge, the city has pioneered a raft of regulations to get its citizens to be healthier — or at least realize they're slowly killing themselves. The 68-year-old billionaire's campaign against death-by-preventable-disease has also spearheaded a national movement. On his watch, the city banned cigarettes in bars, put fresh produce in poor neighborhoods and went after trans fats like they were deadbeat dads.
OPINION
October 24, 2002
Re "A Cancer in the Body Politic: 41 Million Uninsured Americans," Washington Outlook, Oct. 21: Let's get something straight. Any American without health insurance is an American who has chosen that condition. I'm 55, lost my job and employer-provided insurance in early 2001 and subsequently replaced it with a $178-a-month plan from a private insurer. At no cost, www.ehealthinsurance.com will supply dozens of quotes from a variety of sources. Today I priced plans for a family of four: a male, age 32; a female, age 30; with two children, ages 8 and 6. Premiums ranged from $99 to $191 (and higher depending on deductibles, coverages)
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Soda consumption is down nationwide, to per capita levels last seen in 1987. It's even down among kids. As word gets out about the empty calories in soft drinks, people have been getting the message. Such changes come slowly, but they happen. But other things are happening as well. Teenagers have been replacing their sodas with coffee. And we're not talking double shots of espresso. They go for the milky, sweetened coffees that, per ounce, contain twice the calories of a Coca-Cola.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2007 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Assemblywoman Sally Lieber hit a nerve when she mused publicly this week about making it illegal for parents to strike children younger than 4. The Bay Area Democrat hasn't introduced a bill yet, but critical calls and e-mails -- including some personal attacks -- have flooded her offices since her local newspaper wrote about her intention. Unbowed, Lieber said she would introduce a bill next week to make California the first state to make the hitting of a toddler or baby a crime.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu and Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
Proposed legislation to remove junk food and sugar-loaded drinks from vending machines at California state office buildings and on government property is intensifying debate about when the battle against obesity becomes a gateway to "nanny state" tactics. Backers of the Assembly bill, AB 459, said California shouldn't condone the sale of fatty snacks and sodas in the workplace when taxpayers are already shelling out vast amounts to cover the healthcare costs of overweight government employees.
OPINION
June 22, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
There's a great moment in the 1993 movie "Searching for Bobby Fischer." Ben Kingsley plays a coach for a 7-year-old chess prodigy named Josh. Kingsley wants the boy to stop playing chess in the park and devote himself completely to Kingsley's tutelage. Josh's mother doesn't like the idea, because she's a jealous guardian of her son's childhood. "Not playing in the park would kill him. He loves it." Kingsley complains that her decision "just makes my job harder." "Then your job's harder," she responds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2011 | By Michael J. Mishak and Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- Fifteen years after California voters legalized medical marijuana, state lawmakers are still struggling with how to regulate and tax what has become a billion-dollar industry fueled by the growing number of pot dispensaries up and down the state. Lawmakers took steps recently to ban pot shops from residential neighborhoods and give local governments the authority to shut down problem operators. They also rejected proposals to reduce penalties for illegal pot cultivation and protect medical marijuana patients from workplace discrimination.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The latest target in the battle over fast food is something you shouldn't even put in your mouth. Convinced that Happy Meals and other food promotions aimed at children could make kids fat as well as happy, county officials in Silicon Valley are poised to outlaw the little toys that often come with high-calorie offerings. The proposed ban is the latest in a growing string of efforts to change the types of foods aimed at youngsters and the way they are cooked and sold. Across the nation, cities, states and school boards have taken aim at excessive sugar, salt and certain types of fats.
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