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December 27, 2005 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
The exit off the 101 you take to get to Naomi Foner's house is marked by a billboard for "Jarhead" and that is a little weird. It's hard to drive very far these days without passing a billboard for a Jake Gyllenhaal movie, but still, it's surprising to see one looming above the turnoff for his parents' house. Foner, at this point, is used to it. An Oscar-nominated screenwriter with a director husband and two actor children, she understands the nature of the business.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
PARK CITY, Utah - Hollywood is dominated by men, and so, it turns out, is independent film. As a new study of Sundance Film Festival titles shows, less than a quarter of all American features over the last 10 years at Sundance were directed by women. Some years have a stronger representation of female filmmakers than others; this year, for the first time, half of the 16 U.S. competition dramas at Sundance were made by women. FULL COVERAGE: Sundance Film Festival 2013 In an intimate and animated conversation with five women whose movies were playing here, the filmmakers discussed double standards about employment and trust, how tough women are considered shrill rather than determined, and how male producers continue to be unnerved by women's stories, especially ones involving sex. The directors were Naomi Foner, 66, who wrote and directed the coming-of-age tale "Very Good Girls"; Liz W. Garcia, 35, who wrote and directed "The Lifeguard," about a journalist's affair with a high school boy; Cherien Dabis, 36, who wrote, directed and stars in the marriage story "May in the Summer"; Hannah Fidell, 27, who wrote and directed "A Teacher," about an educator's relationship with a student; and Gabriela Cowperthwaite, 41, who directed "Blackfish," a documentary about killer whale training.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1993
Well, Excuse Us Following are some addendum to last Sunday's SNEAKS '93 issue: Sleepless in Seattle, directed by Nora Ephron and starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, will be released this summer by TriStar. The Innocent, with Anthony Hopkins and Isabella Rossellini and directed by John Schlesinger, is due out this fall. Ian McEwan adapted his novel. The information provided for Naked in New York omitted co-writer John Warren. Also, the screenwriter for A Dangerous Woman is Naomi Foner.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2005 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
The exit off the 101 you take to get to Naomi Foner's house is marked by a billboard for "Jarhead" and that is a little weird. It's hard to drive very far these days without passing a billboard for a Jake Gyllenhaal movie, but still, it's surprising to see one looming above the turnoff for his parents' house. Foner, at this point, is used to it. An Oscar-nominated screenwriter with a director husband and two actor children, she understands the nature of the business.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
PARK CITY, Utah - Hollywood is dominated by men, and so, it turns out, is independent film. As a new study of Sundance Film Festival titles shows, less than a quarter of all American features over the last 10 years at Sundance were directed by women. Some years have a stronger representation of female filmmakers than others; this year, for the first time, half of the 16 U.S. competition dramas at Sundance were made by women. FULL COVERAGE: Sundance Film Festival 2013 In an intimate and animated conversation with five women whose movies were playing here, the filmmakers discussed double standards about employment and trust, how tough women are considered shrill rather than determined, and how male producers continue to be unnerved by women's stories, especially ones involving sex. The directors were Naomi Foner, 66, who wrote and directed the coming-of-age tale "Very Good Girls"; Liz W. Garcia, 35, who wrote and directed "The Lifeguard," about a journalist's affair with a high school boy; Cherien Dabis, 36, who wrote, directed and stars in the marriage story "May in the Summer"; Hannah Fidell, 27, who wrote and directed "A Teacher," about an educator's relationship with a student; and Gabriela Cowperthwaite, 41, who directed "Blackfish," a documentary about killer whale training.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG and ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Local playwright Marlane Meyer, whose "The Geography of Luck" opens Tuesday at South Coast Repertory, has been awarded the PEN Center U.S.A. West 1989 Literary Award for drama for her play, "Kingfish," which premiered last fall at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. Also receiving awards are writers Pete Dexter, Mae Briskin, Paul Monette, Ellen Howard, Virginia Euwer Wolff Naomi Foner, Shawn Hubler, Lennie LaGuire, Robert Duncan, William Everson and Lee Tae-bok. The 1Oth annual awards banquet will be held Saturday at the Biltmore Hotel.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
"Working Girl," the corporate Cinderella comedy, and "Running On Empty," a contemporary look at 1960s activists, led all other films in nominations for the 46th annual Golden Globe Awards, it was announced today. "Working Girl" collected six nominations, including best musical or comedy motion picture, best director for Mike Nichols, actress for star Melanie Griffith, and screenplay for Kevin Wade.
NEWS
May 22, 1989
PEN Center USA West honored winners of its 10th annual literary awards at a banquet on Saturday at the Biltmore. The awards are given for outstanding achievement by writers west of the Mississippi. The winners were: Pete Dexter, in fiction, for "Paris Trout"; Mae Briskin, short story, "A Boy Like Astrid's Mother"; Paul Monette, nonfiction, "Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir"; Ellen Howard, "Her Own Song," children's books; Virginia Euwer Wolff for "Probably Still Nick Swanson," young adult; Michael Palmer, "Sun," poetry; Naomi Foner, "Running on Empty," screenplay; Shawn Hubler and Lennie LaGuire, "Asian Pacific Sketchbook," journalism; and Marlane Meyer, "Kingfish," drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1999
The Writers Guild of America, west will sponsor a female screenwriters' panel at 5 p.m. Saturday at the L.A. County Museum of Art. Scheduled panelists--who will discuss the opportunities and constraints that female writers face in Hollywood today--include Naomi Foner ("Running on Empty"), Nancy Meyers ("Private Benjamin"), Anna Hamilton Phelan ("Gorillas in the Mist"), Robin Swicord ("Little Women") and Anna Thomas ("El Norte").
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1993
Well, Excuse Us Following are some addendum to last Sunday's SNEAKS '93 issue: Sleepless in Seattle, directed by Nora Ephron and starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, will be released this summer by TriStar. The Innocent, with Anthony Hopkins and Isabella Rossellini and directed by John Schlesinger, is due out this fall. Ian McEwan adapted his novel. The information provided for Naked in New York omitted co-writer John Warren. Also, the screenwriter for A Dangerous Woman is Naomi Foner.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2010 | By Susan King
Today was a good day for "District 9," "An Education," "Precious" and "Up in the Air," each of which pulled in a best picture nomination for the USC Libraries 22nd Annual Scripter Award just hours after receiving similar honors from the Producers Guild of America. The fifth Scripter nod went to the Jeff Bridges drama "Crazy Heart." The award honors both the author and screenwriter of the year's best book-to-film adaptation (or in the case of "District 9," a short film screenplay adaptation)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Chris Lee and John Horn, Los Angeles Times
PARK CITY, Utah - Parties at the Sundance Film Festival typically feature maverick filmmakers, the best in nouvelle cowboy cuisine and plentiful pours of high-end spirits and Utah microbrews. But the bash thrown by Hollywood's powerful Creative Artists Agency on Sunday night took festival revelry in an unexpectedly bawdy direction, as Sundance guests mingled with lingerie-clad women pretending to snort prop cocaine, erotic dancers outfitted with sex toys and an Alice in Wonderland look-alike performing a simulated sex act on a man in a rabbit costume.
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