Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNapoleon Bonaparte
IN THE NEWS

Napoleon Bonaparte

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
September 14, 1997 | GREGOR DALLAS, Gregor Dallas is the author of "The Final Act: The Roads to Waterloo," forthcoming from Henry Holt
What do actors Rod Steiger, Charles Boyer, Marlon Brando and Albert Dieudonne have in common? They have all played the role of Napoleon. And they are not the only ones. Napoleon Bonaparte, next to Jesus Christ, is the most performed historical personality in cinema. There are Arabian films about him, along with Japanese films, Communist films and Nazi films. This year is the centennial of the first footage ever made on him.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 1, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
Mingling with extras in historical costumes and fans who called him "His Imperial Highness," Charles Napoleon sipped from a plastic cup and said matter-of-factly: "I gave my spit to be analyzed. " The affable businessman was referring to a recent study by a French scientist that matched his DNA to that of his great-great-grand-uncle, Napoleon Bonaparte I. Yes, that Napoleon Bonaparte. The study, part of an effort to reconstruct the genome of the 19th century emperor, may eventually help solve the mystery of whether the remains preserved in Napoleon's tomb in Les Invalides museum in Paris are really his. Napoleonic DNA was just one focus of avid discussion at recent festivities here marking the 198th anniversary of one of Napoleon's last military victories.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2000
The only difference between the self-coronations of George W. Bush and Napoleon Bonaparte is that at least the French didn't have to watch the spectacle on television. M.J. JOHNSON San Luis Obispo
TRAVEL
December 14, 2008 | Borzou Daragahi, Jane Engle and Catharine Hamm
Napoleon and Egypt, in Paris A brash young Western leader invades a Middle East country, ostensibly to spread democratic ideals. Instead he winds up resented by the locals and strengthening his rivals, who immediately exploit his weaknesses. We're talking, of course, about Napoleon Bonaparte, the French general whose forces invaded and briefly occupied Egypt nine years after a cataclysmic revolution. His late-18th century adventures in the land of the Pharaohs are chronicled and dissected in "Bonaparte and Egypt," a fascinating and extensive exhibit of paintings, manuscripts and artifacts at the gigantic Institut du Monde Arabe along the Seine River in Paris.
NEWS
November 17, 1987 | Associated Press
Napoleon Bonaparte met his second Waterloo on ABC last week as the miniseries "Napoleon and Josephine: A Love Story" ended up in the Nielsen ratings' version of St. Helena. The three-part series, despite its beautiful French background and the tempestuous love story re-enacted by Armand Assante and Jacqueline Bisset, failed to arouse much interest from the viewers. The first chapter Tuesday was in 15th place. The next night it dropped to 26th place. The third night it fell to 30th place.
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | Times Wire Services
Officials of the Forensic Institute of Strasbourg said Friday that tests on five samples of emperor Napoleon Bonaparte's hair confirm "major exposure to arsenic." The results were presented at a news conference featuring a leading proponent of the poisoning theory: Ben Weider, a Canadian author of six books on the emperor. Napoleon was the victim of a British-French conspiracy and died at the hands of a friend, Weider claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1998
Professional archeologists said Wednesday that they had discovered the sunken remains of Napoleon Bonaparte's fleet, destroyed Aug. 1, 1798, by Britain's Admiral Nelson. Archeologist Franck Goddio of Underwater Archeology and Discovery Ltd. said the remains were found in the Eastern Harbor of Alexandria in Egypt. Goddio had previously found the submerged royal city of Cleopatra and the Ptolemies in the same harbor.
WORLD
March 1, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
Mingling with extras in historical costumes and fans who called him "His Imperial Highness," Charles Napoleon sipped from a plastic cup and said matter-of-factly: "I gave my spit to be analyzed. " The affable businessman was referring to a recent study by a French scientist that matched his DNA to that of his great-great-grand-uncle, Napoleon Bonaparte I. Yes, that Napoleon Bonaparte. The study, part of an effort to reconstruct the genome of the 19th century emperor, may eventually help solve the mystery of whether the remains preserved in Napoleon's tomb in Les Invalides museum in Paris are really his. Napoleonic DNA was just one focus of avid discussion at recent festivities here marking the 198th anniversary of one of Napoleon's last military victories.
OPINION
March 4, 2008
Re "War and peace, the Army way," Opinion, Feb. 28 Face it: The Iraq fiasco has degenerated into a failed colonial war. No Army Field Manual will ever change it. Staying there for another 100 years won't change it. Commanders from Napoleon Bonaparte onward have stated that counterinsurgencies must avoid killing, gain respect from the occupied nations and quickly restore peace and normal commerce. We have instead destroyed Iraq as a functioning state, and it is bleeding us and the Iraqis white.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
With "Monsieur N.," director Antoine de Caunes and writer Rene Manzor have fashioned an elegant, sophisticated mystery from a combination of contradictory historical records and tantalizing speculation that surrounded the fate of Napoleon Bonaparte during his exile on the island of St. Helena beginning in October 1815 after his defeat at Waterloo.
BOOKS
June 20, 2004 | Douglas Johnson, Douglas Johnson is emeritus professor of French history at the University of London.
It's inevitable that those who write about Napoleon Bonaparte find themselves thinking of their youth and when they discovered the emperor's existence. Steven Englund remembers reading "The History of Napoleon the First" as a boy attending a Los Angeles junior high school.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
With U.S.-French relations at a modern-day low, it may seem like a strange time for an American network to be celebrating the life of France's greatest warrior with an epic miniseries. Thankfully, A&E's two-part, four-hour "Napoleon," airing tonight and Wednesday at 8 p.m., won't make relations any more acrimonious.
BOOKS
December 22, 2002 | John Lukacs, John Lukacs is the author of numerous books, including "Churchill: Visionary, Statesman, Historian," "At the End of an Age" and "The Hitler of History."
Napoleon and Wellington The Battle of Waterloo and the Great Commanders Who Fought It Andrew Roberts Simon & Schuster: 350 pp., $27 * In recent years there has been a spate of books with a similar approach -- the depiction of parallel lives -- and seldom have they been successful. A portrait of two lives is not necessarily more interesting than that of one life, especially when they are forcibly put next to each other.
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | Times Wire Services
Officials of the Forensic Institute of Strasbourg said Friday that tests on five samples of emperor Napoleon Bonaparte's hair confirm "major exposure to arsenic." The results were presented at a news conference featuring a leading proponent of the poisoning theory: Ben Weider, a Canadian author of six books on the emperor. Napoleon was the victim of a British-French conspiracy and died at the hands of a friend, Weider claims.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
With "Monsieur N.," director Antoine de Caunes and writer Rene Manzor have fashioned an elegant, sophisticated mystery from a combination of contradictory historical records and tantalizing speculation that surrounded the fate of Napoleon Bonaparte during his exile on the island of St. Helena beginning in October 1815 after his defeat at Waterloo.
OPINION
April 2, 2000 | Andy Borowitz, Andy Borowitz was the creator of the television show "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" and is the author of "The Trillionaire Next Door."
[The] publication of Tom King's biography, "The Operator: David Geffen Builds, Buys and Sells the New Hollywood," has incensed this pioneer of the California rock scene. . . . Reportedly, Geffen regrets that he granted access to King, a Wall Street Journal reporter, and has been referring to King as "Kitty Kelley" when bad-mouthing the bio. --Salon * From the Desk of Napoleon Bonaparte, Island of St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2000
The only difference between the self-coronations of George W. Bush and Napoleon Bonaparte is that at least the French didn't have to watch the spectacle on television. M.J. JOHNSON San Luis Obispo
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
"Napoleon," a two-night documentary series on PBS, is as intoxicating as history on television gets. It turns out the most storied French leader ever--a genius general and cosmic empire builder before he was 30--wasn't named after a puff pastry, after all. Another superb work from David Grubin, "Napoleon" sets a standard for historical documentaries.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|