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NEWS
July 28, 2000 | GREG MILLER and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge may have pulled the plug on the song-swapping party at Napster Inc., but partygoers Thursday simply moved, as many of Napster's 22 million users quickly scattered to other piracy platforms that will be tougher for the record industry to stop. Amid outpourings of anger and grief by Napster fans, who behaved as though one of their rock idols had died, Web sites offering downloads of Gnutella, Napigator and other file-sharing tools were deluged by music fans.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Alex Winter's documentary "Downloaded" charts the rise and fall of Napster, the upstart file-sharing music-community hub that made founders Shawn Fanning and Sean Parker into either Information Age heroes or criminal masterminds, depending on how you see technology as a force for cultural openness. The movie prefers the hero moniker, presenting this '90s story as a rise-and-fall tragedy in which Napster - had it not been hampered by crippling lawsuits stemming from the recording industry's siege mentality about its business - could have become iTunes before iTunes.
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BUSINESS
September 25, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Napster Inc. said Monday that it reached a tentative settlement with a major music publishing group, a deal that provides both a sizable cut of royalties for songwriters and a precedent for how publishers and labels would divide online music revenue. Under the tentative pact between the controversial Redwood City, Calif.-based online song-swapping service and the National Music Publishers Assn.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Best Buy Co. has given up on the increasingly crowded digital music market, selling its struggling Napster online music service to competitor Rhapsody in exchange for a minority stake in the combined company. The deal comes three years after Best Buy paid $121 million to acquire Napster Inc., the first wildly popular source of Internet piracy that morphed into a legitimate paid music service. It gives Rhapsody more power to compete against hot digital music upstarts such as Spotify, MOG and Rdio.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Alex Winter's documentary "Downloaded" charts the rise and fall of Napster, the upstart file-sharing music-community hub that made founders Shawn Fanning and Sean Parker into either Information Age heroes or criminal masterminds, depending on how you see technology as a force for cultural openness. The movie prefers the hero moniker, presenting this '90s story as a rise-and-fall tragedy in which Napster - had it not been hampered by crippling lawsuits stemming from the recording industry's siege mentality about its business - could have become iTunes before iTunes.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Best Buy Co. has given up on the increasingly crowded digital music market, selling its struggling Napster online music service to competitor Rhapsody in exchange for a minority stake in the combined company. The deal comes three years after Best Buy paid $121 million to acquire Napster Inc., the first wildly popular source of Internet piracy that morphed into a legitimate paid music service. It gives Rhapsody more power to compete against hot digital music upstarts such as Spotify, MOG and Rdio.
OPINION
December 28, 2006 | STEVE BALLMER; NED SHERMAN; RAFAT ALI; KEVIN WERBACH; CHRIS ANDERSON; HANK BARRY; JOHN BROCKMAN
You'll be back in control STEVE BALLMER Steve Ballmer is the chief executive of Microsoft Corp. RIGHT NOW, I AM as excited by the prospects for technology-driven change as I've ever been. The impact of the Internet, e-mail and mobile phones has been so dramatic that people tend to think the digital revolution has already happened. I think it's just getting started. Many technologies have the potential to catch fire, including Internet television, mobile video devices and even robots.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2003 | Jon Healey and Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writers
The online music service launched by two of the world's largest record companies to combat Internet piracy may soon have a new and familiar name: Napster. Sources said Friday that Universal Music Group and Sony Music Entertainment were nearing a deal to sell Pressplay, their 3-year-old online music venture, to the software company that bought Napster Inc.'s name and technology at a bankruptcy auction last year. Roxio Inc.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Bertelsmann, Europe's largest media company, doesn't have to disclose its communications with lawyers in its legal fight with record companies over its ties to Los Angeles-based music downloading service Napster Inc., a court said. A federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled that companies including EMI Group, the third-largest record company, didn't prove a fraud that would override lawyer-client confidentiality.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Bertelsmann, Europe's largest media company, agreed to pay $130 million to resolve claims by music publishers that its investment in the original Napster music download service contributed to copyright infringement. The accord resolves a legal battle between Bertelsmann and record labels and music publishers that claimed the company's loans helped Napster stay in business.
OPINION
December 28, 2006 | STEVE BALLMER; NED SHERMAN; RAFAT ALI; KEVIN WERBACH; CHRIS ANDERSON; HANK BARRY; JOHN BROCKMAN
You'll be back in control STEVE BALLMER Steve Ballmer is the chief executive of Microsoft Corp. RIGHT NOW, I AM as excited by the prospects for technology-driven change as I've ever been. The impact of the Internet, e-mail and mobile phones has been so dramatic that people tend to think the digital revolution has already happened. I think it's just getting started. Many technologies have the potential to catch fire, including Internet television, mobile video devices and even robots.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2003 | Jon Healey and Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writers
The online music service launched by two of the world's largest record companies to combat Internet piracy may soon have a new and familiar name: Napster. Sources said Friday that Universal Music Group and Sony Music Entertainment were nearing a deal to sell Pressplay, their 3-year-old online music venture, to the software company that bought Napster Inc.'s name and technology at a bankruptcy auction last year. Roxio Inc.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Napster Inc. said Monday that it reached a tentative settlement with a major music publishing group, a deal that provides both a sizable cut of royalties for songwriters and a precedent for how publishers and labels would divide online music revenue. Under the tentative pact between the controversial Redwood City, Calif.-based online song-swapping service and the National Music Publishers Assn.
NEWS
July 28, 2000 | GREG MILLER and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge may have pulled the plug on the song-swapping party at Napster Inc., but partygoers Thursday simply moved, as many of Napster's 22 million users quickly scattered to other piracy platforms that will be tougher for the record industry to stop. Amid outpourings of anger and grief by Napster fans, who behaved as though one of their rock idols had died, Web sites offering downloads of Gnutella, Napigator and other file-sharing tools were deluged by music fans.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2000 | From Reuters
Hard rock band Limp Bizkit has teamed up with controversial Internet company Napster Inc. to launch a free U.S. concert tour, and the group's singer on Monday criticized fellow artists who have accused Napster of promoting music piracy. Napster software allows users to trade and search for MP3s, free downloadable files of musical performances. A fan can type in the name of the desired song, click on the desired version and instantly download it--all for free.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2012 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Rob Wells is president of global digital business at Universal Music Group. With a global staff of 75 and an office that sits next to the company's chief executive in Santa Monica, Wells must chart the digital course for the world's largest record company. The opening act: Wells landed his first record company job in 1994 at BMG Entertainment in his native Britain, where his job included sorting through the company's fan mail and building a database of customer names and addresses for promotional mailings.
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