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BUSINESS
August 6, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Charles used to work at NASA and wants to stay in touch with the space program via NASA TV, the cable channel paid for by tax dollars and provided free to telecom companies. Turns out, though, that his AT&T U-verse package doesn't include NASA TV. To receive the channel, he was told, he'd have to pay for a more expensive programming package. More videos from Ask Laz Charles' question: Why should NASA TV be considered a premium channel considering that taxpayers have already paid for it?
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NEWS
February 25, 1986 | Associated Press
Indicted NASA Administrator James M. Beggs resigned today, allowing President Reagan to name a new top space agency executive, congressional officials said. Beggs, 60, had been administrator of NASA since July 7, 1981, three months after the first shuttle flight. He has been on unpaid leave since Dec. 2, when he and three other former General Dynamics executives were indicted by a grand jury on charges they plotted to hide cost overruns on the ill-fated Sgt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1990
Easterbrook's column about NASA's bureaucracy is correct when it faults our politicians for rewarding that bureaucracy, but it doesn't go far enough. The growth and entrenchment of the bureaucracy at NASA is a sign of a problem with our government. Other agencies, such as the IRS and the FAA, are doing the same thing. All these agencies have a clear purpose. For instance, NASA is supposed to do aircraft and space research, the IRS is supposed to make sure that everyone is paying their taxes, and the FAA is supposed to make sure that air travel is safe.
OPINION
November 8, 1998
Every year of his presidency, Bill Clinton pursues radical budget slashing to take NASA apart. Amazingly, he finds time to photo-op the launch of the group he has fought so hard to de-fund (Oct. 30). Almost as amazing is that he had the time to do this in between his 102nd and 103rd fund-raisers of the year. JOHN HARDISON Corona
SCIENCE
April 21, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
This Earth Day NASA is asking citizens of the Earth to step outside and photograph themselves wherever on the planet they happen to be. The space agency's celebration of the Earth and the people who live on it is called, appropriately, #globalselfie. To participate all you need is a digital camera and a sign indicating which spot on our planet you happen to be standing on. (Not feeling creative? NASA has a sign you can print out on its website. It reads, "Hi NASA! I'm on Earth Right Now @_______)
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Last summer astronaut Luca Parmitano came perilously close to drowning in space after more than a liter of water leaked into his helmet. Today NASA officials said they are still trying to figure out what went wrong. The near-drowning occurred July 16 about one hour into Parmitano's second spacewalk. Forty-four minutes into the walk, the Italian astronaut noticed the back of his head was wet. Ten minutes later he reported the amount of water was increasing. By the time mission control decided to abort the mission 23 minutes later, large droplets of water were starting to cover Parmitano's eyes, nose and ears as he made his way toward the air lock.
SCIENCE
May 2, 2013 | By Amina Khan
NASA wants to send haikus to Mars, and you - yes, you! - might be just the poet for the job. The space agency plans to launch a spacecraft to study the upper layers of the Red Planet's atmosphere in November. But before the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission (known as MAVEN) blasts off, NASA is asking the public to submit their names for a DVD that will be loaded onto the Martian satellite. If you missed your chance at getting your name engraved on microchips on the Mars rover Curiosity (along with the names of 1.2 million other people)
SCIENCE
April 8, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
The search for Earth-like planets, and ultimately life beyond Earth, is about to get a boost: In 2017, NASA will send a satellite called TESS into orbit with the goal of finding planets in our solar neighborhood that may be hospitable to life.  NASA's Kepler mission has been scanning a small portion of the sky since 2009 in search of planets that orbit stars other than our own, but the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite mission will be scanning...
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