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NEWS
July 8, 1986 | Associated Press
NASA reached outside its own organization today and appointed an industry expert as the head of a new safety office to guard against a repetition of the Challenger disaster. George A. Rodney, director of mission success at the Martin-Marietta Orlando Aerospace Co. in Florida, will have charge of all safety, reliability and quality assurance functions in NASA activities.
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NEWS
December 2, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Two astronauts will go on a second spacewalk Wednesday to conduct crucial space station tests that had to be scrapped because of last week's satellite rescue. NASA managers approved the five-hour spacewalk for the crew of space shuttle Columbia. It will be NASA's last spacewalk before construction begins next summer on the international space station.
WORLD
October 15, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A quirky habit of German insomniacs and "chill-out" music fans has come to world attention thanks to the U.S. government shutdown. "Space Night," a nearly 20-year-old late-night broadcast by Bavarian Television, provides a music-sharing platform against a backdrop of NASA's video feed from the International Space Station. But the 15-day-old U.S. government shutdown has idled the NASA archivists responsible for relaying the imagery beyond Mission Control, cutting off fresh backdrops to mix with the music for "Space Night" broadcasts that were to have launched a new season Nov. 1. NASA archivists were put on unpaid leave at the start of October, when 700,000 government workers whose jobs weren't deemed essential to defense and security were furloughed until the contentious U.S. Congress passes a budget for the new fiscal year.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Charles used to work at NASA and wants to stay in touch with the space program via NASA TV, the cable channel paid for by tax dollars and provided free to telecom companies. Turns out, though, that his AT&T U-verse package doesn't include NASA TV. To receive the channel, he was told, he'd have to pay for a more expensive programming package. More videos from Ask Laz Charles' question: Why should NASA TV be considered a premium channel considering that taxpayers have already paid for it?
SCIENCE
May 2, 2013 | By Amina Khan
NASA wants to send haikus to Mars, and you - yes, you! - might be just the poet for the job. The space agency plans to launch a spacecraft to study the upper layers of the Red Planet's atmosphere in November. But before the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission (known as MAVEN) blasts off, NASA is asking the public to submit their names for a DVD that will be loaded onto the Martian satellite. If you missed your chance at getting your name engraved on microchips on the Mars rover Curiosity (along with the names of 1.2 million other people)
SCIENCE
June 9, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Science Now blog
Bake sales at high schools to raise money for trips to Washington, D.C., football uniforms, art supplies and the like are commonplace in these tough budgetary times. But a bake sale for NASA planetary science? On Saturday, scientists from Caltech and UCLA will be out in force at La Canada High School, with chocolate chip cookies and brownies on hand, as part of a nationwide Planetary Bake Sale that is intended to raise awareness of proposed cuts to the NASA science budget.
NEWS
February 25, 1986 | Associated Press
Indicted NASA Administrator James M. Beggs resigned today, allowing President Reagan to name a new top space agency executive, congressional officials said. Beggs, 60, had been administrator of NASA since July 7, 1981, three months after the first shuttle flight. He has been on unpaid leave since Dec. 2, when he and three other former General Dynamics executives were indicted by a grand jury on charges they plotted to hide cost overruns on the ill-fated Sgt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1990
Easterbrook's column about NASA's bureaucracy is correct when it faults our politicians for rewarding that bureaucracy, but it doesn't go far enough. The growth and entrenchment of the bureaucracy at NASA is a sign of a problem with our government. Other agencies, such as the IRS and the FAA, are doing the same thing. All these agencies have a clear purpose. For instance, NASA is supposed to do aircraft and space research, the IRS is supposed to make sure that everyone is paying their taxes, and the FAA is supposed to make sure that air travel is safe.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Last summer astronaut Luca Parmitano came perilously close to drowning in space after more than a liter of water leaked into his helmet. Today NASA officials said they are still trying to figure out what went wrong. The near-drowning occurred July 16 about one hour into Parmitano's second spacewalk. Forty-four minutes into the walk, the Italian astronaut noticed the back of his head was wet. Ten minutes later he reported the amount of water was increasing. By the time mission control decided to abort the mission 23 minutes later, large droplets of water were starting to cover Parmitano's eyes, nose and ears as he made his way toward the air lock.
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Having trouble getting excited about NASA's planned mission to redirect an asteroid? Maybe William Gerstenmaier can help. "Turn off your logical side and turn on your touchy-feely side, the one you almost never use," Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Directorate, told attendees of an aeronautics and astronautics conference Wednesday in San Diego. "Then jump up and down and do some break-dancing. We're going to grab a space rock and we're going to move it!"
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