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SCIENCE
April 2, 2014 | By Amina Khan
As NASA plans to send astronauts to an asteroid or even to Mars in the coming decades -- missions that could last well beyond 30 days -- they're grappling with an ethical dilemma. How do they handle decisions on long-distance space exploration when it could expose astronauts to high or unknown health hazards? To help develop an ethical framework for venturing into this unknown territory, the space agency asked the Institute of Medicine to convene a panel of experts to offer some helpful guidelines.
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NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
With her long blond ponytail floating above her inside the International Space Station, astronaut Karen Nyberg calmly explains the challenges of quilting in weightlessness. "Now that I've tried my hand sewing in space," she said in a video released Thursday by NASA, "I can say one thing with certainty: It's tricky. " As if being a mechanical engineer and astronaut isn't significant enough, the avid quilter brought sewing supplies including fabric, scissors, thread, five needles (but no pins)
SCIENCE
April 21, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
This Earth Day NASA is asking citizens of the Earth to step outside and photograph themselves wherever on the planet they happen to be. The space agency's celebration of the Earth and the people who live on it is called, appropriately, #globalselfie. To participate all you need is a digital camera and a sign indicating which spot on our planet you happen to be standing on. (Not feeling creative? NASA has a sign you can print out on its website. It reads, "Hi NASA! I'm on Earth Right Now @_______)
BUSINESS
August 6, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Charles used to work at NASA and wants to stay in touch with the space program via NASA TV, the cable channel paid for by tax dollars and provided free to telecom companies. Turns out, though, that his AT&T U-verse package doesn't include NASA TV. To receive the channel, he was told, he'd have to pay for a more expensive programming package. More videos from Ask Laz Charles' question: Why should NASA TV be considered a premium channel considering that taxpayers have already paid for it?
NEWS
July 8, 1986 | Associated Press
NASA reached outside its own organization today and appointed an industry expert as the head of a new safety office to guard against a repetition of the Challenger disaster. George A. Rodney, director of mission success at the Martin-Marietta Orlando Aerospace Co. in Florida, will have charge of all safety, reliability and quality assurance functions in NASA activities.
SCIENCE
June 9, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Science Now blog
Bake sales at high schools to raise money for trips to Washington, D.C., football uniforms, art supplies and the like are commonplace in these tough budgetary times. But a bake sale for NASA planetary science? On Saturday, scientists from Caltech and UCLA will be out in force at La Canada High School, with chocolate chip cookies and brownies on hand, as part of a nationwide Planetary Bake Sale that is intended to raise awareness of proposed cuts to the NASA science budget.
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Having trouble getting excited about NASA's planned mission to redirect an asteroid? Maybe William Gerstenmaier can help. "Turn off your logical side and turn on your touchy-feely side, the one you almost never use," Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Directorate, told attendees of an aeronautics and astronautics conference Wednesday in San Diego. "Then jump up and down and do some break-dancing. We're going to grab a space rock and we're going to move it!"
SCIENCE
March 7, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
What happens to our DNA, RNA and proteins if we spend a long time in space? A pair of 50-year-old twins will help NASA find out. Identical twins Mark and Scott Kelly have signed up to be part of the first-ever twin study that takes place, at least partially, in space. In March 2015, veteran astronaut Scott Kelly will begin a one-year stint living aboard the International Space Station. It will be the longest amount of consecutive time that any American astronaut has spent in space.  His brother Mark Kelly, who is married to former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, will stay on Earth and serve as a control in the study.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Last summer astronaut Luca Parmitano came perilously close to drowning in space after more than a liter of water leaked into his helmet. Today NASA officials said they are still trying to figure out what went wrong. The near-drowning occurred July 16 about one hour into Parmitano's second spacewalk. Forty-four minutes into the walk, the Italian astronaut noticed the back of his head was wet. Ten minutes later he reported the amount of water was increasing. By the time mission control decided to abort the mission 23 minutes later, large droplets of water were starting to cover Parmitano's eyes, nose and ears as he made his way toward the air lock.
NEWS
February 25, 1986 | Associated Press
Indicted NASA Administrator James M. Beggs resigned today, allowing President Reagan to name a new top space agency executive, congressional officials said. Beggs, 60, had been administrator of NASA since July 7, 1981, three months after the first shuttle flight. He has been on unpaid leave since Dec. 2, when he and three other former General Dynamics executives were indicted by a grand jury on charges they plotted to hide cost overruns on the ill-fated Sgt.
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