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BUSINESS
September 13, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the exclusive Nashville City Club, whose gray-suited members only recently opened their doors to women, it's easy to forget that this is the capital of country music. There's nary a rhinestone in sight, much less a bale of hay. And the doleful expressions on diners' faces have more to do with failed business deals than broken hearts.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Computer maker Gateway Inc. said it picked Nashville for the company's first U.S. manufacturing facility. The plant, which will employ 300 in its first year, will assemble Gateway's custom-ordered desktop and notebook computers, servers and storage arrays and provide integration and software services. Irvine-based Gateway said the facility would open as early as October. It will augment Gateway's manufacturing facilities in Malaysia, France, Germany and Ireland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First in an occasional series about venues where aspiring artists go to be discovered. NASHVILLE--A steady rain on a chilly night might hurt the turnout at some music clubs, but Bluebird Cafe regulars are true believers, and they flock to the room like parishioners to a church. Some of the seats in the back of the intimate room are even old pews. Like the row of stools at the bar and the chairs at nearly two dozen tables, the pews fill up quickly once the doors open for the 6:30 p.m.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Hundreds of disabled people parked their wheelchairs in intersections around the state Capitol on Monday, shutting down traffic to protest a system they say gives them few options beyond nursing homes. Sixty people were arrested, police spokesman Don Aaron said. Fifty were cited for blocking streets and refusing to move, while 10 were taken to jail.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Most of Nashville's 70,000 downtown workers returned to skyscrapers patched with plywood and tarpaulins following tornadoes that virtually shut down the office district for three days. President Clinton declared six middle Tennessee counties disaster areas, making federal money available for repairs and temporary housing. Eight buildings remained "red-tagged" as unsafe. Most were small commercial businesses and restaurants occupying three- to four-story buildings.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Computer maker Gateway Inc. said it picked Nashville for the company's first U.S. manufacturing facility. The plant, which will employ 300 in its first year, will assemble Gateway's custom-ordered desktop and notebook computers, servers and storage arrays and provide integration and software services. Irvine-based Gateway said the facility would open as early as October. It will augment Gateway's manufacturing facilities in Malaysia, France, Germany and Ireland.
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A vintage plane circled a downtown Nashville, Tenn., neighborhood and clipped trees before crashing between two houses and bursting into flames. Two men in the plane died. Fire Chief Buck Dozier said it was miraculous that no one on the ground was killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1988 | ROBERT HILBURN
From the corners of the country From the cities and the farms With years and years of livin' Tucked up underneath their arms. They walk away from everything Just to see a dream come true. So, God bless the boys Who make the noise On 16th Avenue. --"16th Avenue" by Tom Schuyler Randy Travis is the most dramatic success story in country music in a decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
The $37-million Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, which celebrates its first anniversary this spring, devotes more than 50,000 square feet to the colorful history of country music, but nothing illustrates that story more vividly than a single sheet of Chaves County, N.M., courthouse stationery. Showcased in a crowded display case near the front of the downtown museum's exhibition area, the 1947 handwritten letter is from a promising honky-tonk singer named Lefty Frizzell to his wife.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Hundreds of disabled people parked their wheelchairs in intersections around the state Capitol on Monday, shutting down traffic to protest a system they say gives them few options beyond nursing homes. Sixty people were arrested, police spokesman Don Aaron said. Fifty were cited for blocking streets and refusing to move, while 10 were taken to jail.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
The $37-million Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, which celebrates its first anniversary this spring, devotes more than 50,000 square feet to the colorful history of country music, but nothing illustrates that story more vividly than a single sheet of Chaves County, N.M., courthouse stationery. Showcased in a crowded display case near the front of the downtown museum's exhibition area, the 1947 handwritten letter is from a promising honky-tonk singer named Lefty Frizzell to his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First in an occasional series about venues where aspiring artists go to be discovered. NASHVILLE--A steady rain on a chilly night might hurt the turnout at some music clubs, but Bluebird Cafe regulars are true believers, and they flock to the room like parishioners to a church. Some of the seats in the back of the intimate room are even old pews. Like the row of stools at the bar and the chairs at nearly two dozen tables, the pews fill up quickly once the doors open for the 6:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2001 | JIM PATTERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's large and contemporary, the kind of urban building in which country boys like Jimmie Rodgers or Hank Williams might have hesitated to tread in their day. But study the $37-million, 135,000-square-foot Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, which opens Thursday in downtown Nashville. Notice how the building is shaped like a water tower at one point. What could be a radio transmitter or the steeple of a country church pokes the sky.
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A vintage plane circled a downtown Nashville, Tenn., neighborhood and clipped trees before crashing between two houses and bursting into flames. Two men in the plane died. Fire Chief Buck Dozier said it was miraculous that no one on the ground was killed.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Most of Nashville's 70,000 downtown workers returned to skyscrapers patched with plywood and tarpaulins following tornadoes that virtually shut down the office district for three days. President Clinton declared six middle Tennessee counties disaster areas, making federal money available for repairs and temporary housing. Eight buildings remained "red-tagged" as unsafe. Most were small commercial businesses and restaurants occupying three- to four-story buildings.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the exclusive Nashville City Club, whose gray-suited members only recently opened their doors to women, it's easy to forget that this is the capital of country music. There's nary a rhinestone in sight, much less a bale of hay. And the doleful expressions on diners' faces have more to do with failed business deals than broken hearts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2001 | JIM PATTERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's large and contemporary, the kind of urban building in which country boys like Jimmie Rodgers or Hank Williams might have hesitated to tread in their day. But study the $37-million, 135,000-square-foot Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, which opens Thursday in downtown Nashville. Notice how the building is shaped like a water tower at one point. What could be a radio transmitter or the steeple of a country church pokes the sky.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two recent pop reissues have an Orange County connection. With Rhino in the process of re-releasing the entire Monkees catalogue album-by-album, a tidbit worth noting is that Peter Tork, who played the lovably muddled bassist, stumbled into Orange County before he stumbled into the Monkees. In 1965, Tork moved from New York to Long Beach and supported himself by pouring beers and washing dishes at the Golden Bear nightclub in Huntington Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1988 | ROBERT HILBURN
From the corners of the country From the cities and the farms With years and years of livin' Tucked up underneath their arms. They walk away from everything Just to see a dream come true. So, God bless the boys Who make the noise On 16th Avenue. --"16th Avenue" by Tom Schuyler Randy Travis is the most dramatic success story in country music in a decade.
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