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BUSINESS
July 2, 1989
Mean-spirited is the way to describe the advertising "awards" handed out by the Center for Science in the Public Interest ("Deceit Brings Dishonor to the Worst Ads of '88," June 13.) The center claims to be a public interest organization. Who asked them to represent the public? Most people never heard of the Center for Science in the Public Interest until their nasty "awards" hit the news. The center is actually a special-interest organization whose main purpose seems to be to collect money to attack private enterprise.
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SPORTS
January 6, 1999 | JIM HODGES
King Coach Larry Robinson struggled for a word to describe how he wanted center Olli Jokinen to play. "I don't want to say nasty," Robinson said. "Well, maybe gritty.' Jokinen had no trouble with a description. "Nasty," he said Tuesday. "When I play well, I play a little nasty." Jokinen is big at 6 feet 3, 208 pounds, but is still a little soft at age 19.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1998
The Beastie Boys' "Hello Nasty" is the best-selling album in Southern California on both the pop and rap charts, while the rap 'n' roll group's 1986 album, "Licensed to Ill," tops the hard rock/heavy metal chart. Jermaine Dupri's "Life in 1472" was the week's top debut, according to SoundScan.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1987
Last week we asked our readers to tell us what aspect of the increasingly nasty world of arts and entertainment bugged them the most. They responded. In some cases, quite nastily. To publish a box of coping strategies alongside your series of articles about the Neo-Nasty age in which we live, presupposes that your readership is comprised of victims and not perpetrators. The "them versus me" mind-set can only serve to perpetuate the fractured sense of community that the articles pointed out is at the root of the current social evil.
BOOKS
June 28, 1987
Last week we asked our readers to tell us what aspect of the increasingly nasty world of arts and entertainment bugged them the most. They responded. In some cases, quite nastily. As a member of the Baby Boom generation, I feel no nostalgia for the '60s and '70s. Decades that gave us riots, sexual promiscuity and drug addition hold no allure for me. The '80s have been a return to the appreciation of elegance, style and glamour, as well as a rediscovery of fundamental cultural values.
NEWS
February 2, 1988
Scattered showers are expected over Orange County and the rest of the Southland today as a low-pressure system of subtropical moisture moves inland from the Pacific. Forecasters say the chance of rain is 60% today, with about one-fourth of an inch expected. Light rain could also continue into Wednesday and Thursday, with high temperatures of about 60 expected, according to Patricia Cooper, a meteorologist with WeatherData Inc., which provides forecasts for The Times.
OPINION
December 11, 2008
In keeping with Shakespeare's observation that "he that filches from me my good name ... makes me poor indeed," someone suing for libel ordinarily seeks financial compensation from the person or publication that injured his or her reputation. But archaic laws in several states also allow libel to be prosecuted as a criminal offense, and a Colorado man accused of defaming his ex-girlfriend online now faces the possibility of 18 months in prison. The prosecution of J.P.
SPORTS
December 25, 1985
The Boston Celtics are saying bah-humbug to the league Grinch responsible for scheduling the Celtics to play the New York Knicks in New York on Christmas Day. Kevin McHale pulled a fast one on his 2-year-old daughter and told her that Santa visits Boston first, then the rest of the world Dec. 25. "It's a disaster. We told Kristyn that Santa is coming tonight (Monday), since the team is leaving the night before (Christmas)."
BOOKS
January 7, 1996
William Broyles Jr., your reviewer of "Reporting World War II" (Nov. 12), has an enthusiasm for the wartime reporting which, as a veteran of Patton's Army, I do not share. Only Paul Fussell's "Wartime" and a very few other books capture the true, hideous, dehumanizing nature of World War II. Yes, we read the beloved Ernie Pyle, Bill Mauldin and John Steinbeck, but as Steinbeck later admitted, they held back and were censored in their reporting. Most of the writings your reviewer alludes to were all approved of and censored by wartime censors.
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