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Natalie Angier

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June 28, 1999 | CHARLOTTE INNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A self-described worrier with a temperament she once described as "Rocky Road," Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Natalie Angier is nevertheless riding alternating waves of praise and criticism for her third book, "Woman: An Intimate Geography" (Houghton Mifflin) with the panache of a veteran surfer of controversy.
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BOOKS
May 6, 2007 | K.C. Cole, K.C. Cole teaches at USC's Annenberg School for Communication and is the author, most recently, of "Mind Over Matter: Conversations With the Cosmos."
ONE of the few books I ever stayed up all night to read was "Knowledge and Wonder: The Natural World as Man Knows It," by the late great physicist Victor Weisskopf. In clear, simple prose, it introduced me to atoms and stars, crystals and metals, cells and life. All basic stuff: no black holes, no extra dimensions, no astonishing feats of genetic engineering. Nothing, in short, new.
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BOOKS
August 13, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH
THE BEAUTY OF THE BEASTLY: New Views of the Nature of Life by Natalie Angier (Houghton Mifflin: $21.95; 278 pp.). A couple of decades ago good science writers were hard to find; now scores of general-interest publications have one or more on staff, and give them lots of space. Why the change? Because . . . well, I have no idea, but welcome it because there are so many fascinating things in the wide world of science.
NEWS
June 28, 1999 | CHARLOTTE INNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A self-described worrier with a temperament she once described as "Rocky Road," Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Natalie Angier is nevertheless riding alternating waves of praise and criticism for her third book, "Woman: An Intimate Geography" (Houghton Mifflin) with the panache of a veteran surfer of controversy.
BOOKS
March 28, 1999 | THOMAS LYNCH, Thomas Lynch is the author of "The Undertaking: Life Studies from the Dismal Trade" and "Still Life in Milford: Poems." He lives in Milford, Mich., where he is the funeral director
One knows early on one is reading a classic--a text so necessary and abundant and true that all efforts of its kind, for decades before and after it, will be measured by it. It is the writing, of course.
BOOKS
May 6, 2007 | K.C. Cole, K.C. Cole teaches at USC's Annenberg School for Communication and is the author, most recently, of "Mind Over Matter: Conversations With the Cosmos."
ONE of the few books I ever stayed up all night to read was "Knowledge and Wonder: The Natural World as Man Knows It," by the late great physicist Victor Weisskopf. In clear, simple prose, it introduced me to atoms and stars, crystals and metals, cells and life. All basic stuff: no black holes, no extra dimensions, no astonishing feats of genetic engineering. Nothing, in short, new.
NEWS
June 10, 1988 | LEE DEMBART
Natural Obsessions: The Search for the Oncogene by Natalie Angier (Houghton Mifflin: $19.95; 375 pages) Sometimes at the movies it seems that you have to sit through several minutes of credits--a Such-and-Such production of a So-and-So film, and so forth--before you get to the title. The names of the people and their placement in the pecking order sometimes seem to get more attention than the picture that follows. This concern about massaging people's egos is hardly unique to the movie business.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2008
1. REBIRTH OF THE COOL: It might not have the visibility -- or the performance schedule -- of Wynton Marsalis' Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra. But in terms of soloists, creative arrangements and the sheer ability to swing, the Luckman Jazz Orchestra is second to nobody's ensemble. The always stimulating music of Miles Davis (above) is on the menu for this rare appearance by the orchestra, conducted by the versatile saxophonist Charles Owens. 8 p.m. Sat.
NEWS
April 10, 1991 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Shaw of the Los Angeles Times was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for distinguished criticism Tuesday for his stories of how the media covered the McMartin Pre-School child molestation case.
BOOKS
March 28, 1999 | THOMAS LYNCH, Thomas Lynch is the author of "The Undertaking: Life Studies from the Dismal Trade" and "Still Life in Milford: Poems." He lives in Milford, Mich., where he is the funeral director
One knows early on one is reading a classic--a text so necessary and abundant and true that all efforts of its kind, for decades before and after it, will be measured by it. It is the writing, of course.
BOOKS
August 13, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH
THE BEAUTY OF THE BEASTLY: New Views of the Nature of Life by Natalie Angier (Houghton Mifflin: $21.95; 278 pp.). A couple of decades ago good science writers were hard to find; now scores of general-interest publications have one or more on staff, and give them lots of space. Why the change? Because . . . well, I have no idea, but welcome it because there are so many fascinating things in the wide world of science.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before boarding his mainland-bound flight from Hawaii last April, actor Scott Glenn picked up a paperback copy of "Diamond Head," Irvine writer Charles Knief's 1996 debut mystery novel. "Diamond Head," the first in a series featuring a Hawaii-based private eye who lives aboard a sailboat, finds ex-Navy SEAL John Caine facing contract killers, raging fires and tiger sharks as he searches for the killer of an old Navy friend's daughter who has been raped and murdered.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They are women; hear them roar. Female bodies and sexuality are the subject of two recent audio books, the first of which should be required reading for young women. Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Natalie Angier takes us on a brilliant romp through our innards with "Woman: An Intimate Geography." (NewStar Media; abridged nonfiction; four cassettes; six hours; $25; read by Gabrielle de Cuir.
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