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NATIONAL
February 5, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - "I'm hit! I'm hit!" U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry cried into the southern Arizona darkness that night, Dec. 14, 2010. "I can't feel my legs!" The 40-year-old Border Patrol agent, who was less than four years on the job, collapsed and died in the desert brush near Rio Rico. Terry's killing unraveled the Justice Department-sanctioned "Fast and Furious" gun-tracking operation and triggered one of the biggest political controversies of President Obama's first term.
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NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon plans to remove 50 nuclear-armed intercontinental ballistic missiles from their silos over the next four years but not eliminate them from the U.S. arsenal, a move aimed at complying with a 2010 treaty with Russia and avoiding a fight with members of Congress from states where the missiles are based. Lawmakers had feared reductions in nuclear forces required under the New START treaty would eliminate an entire ICBM squadron at one of three Air Force bases in North Dakota, Montana and Wyoming where the U.S. keeps its 450 Minuteman III missiles - a potentially major economic blow.
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NATIONAL
January 14, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
MAKENA STATE PARK, Hawaii - After a record year of attacks across the Hawaii archipelago, sharks were not far from Colin Dececco's mind as the sun went down on the long white strip of sand here on a recent Sunday evening. He and his daughter had had a close encounter with a reef shark while swimming around the rocky cove at the north end of Makena's Big Beach that morning. Now, watching a spear fisherman haul in his catch as they strolled by the same spot at sunset, they heard a splash at the edge of his net. It was an 8-foot tiger shark, one of the most aggressive shark species in Hawaii's waters and the likely culprit for many of the 14 attacks in 2013, eight of which occurred around Maui, near Makena's beaches and elsewhere.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2014 | By David Pierson and Tiffany Hsu
Come grilling season, expect your sirloin steak to come with a hearty side of sticker shock. Beef prices have reached all-time highs in the U.S. and aren't expected to come down any time soon. Extreme weather has thinned the nation's beef cattle herds to levels last seen in 1951, when there were about half as many mouths to feed in America. "We've seen strong prices before but nothing this extreme," said Dennis Smith, a commodities broker for Archer Financial Services in Chicago.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - President Obama's healthcare law, despite a rocky rollout and determined opposition from critics, already has spurred the largest expansion in health coverage in America in half a century, national surveys and enrollment data show. As the law's initial enrollment period closes, at least 9.5 million previously uninsured people have gained coverage. Some have done so through marketplaces created by the law, some through other private insurance and others through Medicaid, which has expanded under the law in about half the states.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
An Illinois dad got the call on Thursday that no parent ever wants to receive. Brad Lewis' ex-wife was on the phone: Their 15-year-old son had shot himself in the chest. In the note Jordan Lewis left behind, he laid blame on bullying. Although stricken with grief, Lewis, 47, found resolve. He took to Facebook that night and posted a series of videos explaining his son's death and the events leading up to it: the alleged bullying, the concern of his son's best friend, the wellness visit by police the night before the suicide, and the 911 call his son made shortly before pulling the trigger.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
TUNICA, Miss. - Marie Barnard was delighted when, after decades of silence on the topic, Mississippi passed a law requiring school districts to teach sex education. But the lesson involving the Peppermint Pattie wasn't what she had in mind for her sons. The curricula adopted by the school district in Oxford called on students to unwrap a piece of chocolate, pass it around class and observe how dirty it became. "They're using the Peppermint Pattie to show that a girl is no longer clean or valuable after she's had sex - that she's been used," said Barnard, who works in public health.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Police officers may enter and search a home without a warrant as long as one occupant consents, even if another resident has previously objected, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in a Los Angeles case. The 6-3 ruling, triggered by a Los Angeles Police Department arrest in 2009, gives authorities more leeway to search homes without obtaining a warrant, even when there is no emergency. The majority, led by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., said police need not take the time to get a magistrate's approval before entering a home in such cases.
OPINION
June 13, 2012 | By Nathaniel Frank
A study released this week suggests that, contrary to what years of academic research has said, children of gay parents actually fare worse than others. According to the study's author, Mark Regnerus, a professor at University of Texas at Austin, the research "clearly reveals that children appear most apt to succeed well as adults - on multiple counts and across a variety of domains - when they spend their entire childhood with their married mother and father. " Regnerus says that his study shows stark differences between such children and those with gay parents: the latter are more likely to be unemployed, consider suicide, use drugs, have an STD and fall victim to sexual abuse.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2010 | By Sandi Doughton
The fallout from Mt. Rainier's shrinking glaciers is beginning to roll downhill, and nowhere is the impact more striking than on the volcano's west side. "This is it in spades," U.S. Park Service geologist Paul Kennard said recently, scrambling up a 10-foot-high mass of dirt and boulders bulldozed back just enough to clear the road. As receding glaciers expose crumbly slopes, vast amounts of gravel and sediment are being sluiced into the rivers that flow from the region's tallest peak.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Jonathan Fleming had videos of his Disney World holiday. He had a receipt from his hotel, where employees remembered him for running up a high phone bill. But the perfect alibi couldn't save Fleming from serving nearly 25 years in prison for a murder he didn't commit - a murder that took place in Brooklyn, N.Y., more than 900 miles from the Florida resort. On Tuesday, Fleming, 51, walked free after the Brooklyn district attorney, Kenneth P. Thompson, dismissed the case after an examination by his office's Conviction Review Unit.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama used his executive power and a hot-button issue to try to stoke support from a key election-year constituency Tuesday, as he issued two directives aimed at ensuring federal contractors pay women as much as men for equal work. Surrounding himself with female supporters at the White House, Obama signed an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about how much money they make. Advocates say secrecy about salaries is a major contributor to the gap in average pay between male and female workers in the United States, which the White House says means women make 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. The president also ordered contractors to report data to the government showing the compensation paid to employees by gender and race.
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Philip Hersh
NASHVILLE  - If there ever were a sports matchup with organic hype, this is it: the first meeting of two undefeated teams in the final of an NCAA women's basketball tournament. Add to that the sass, snark and sniping the coaches of those teams indulged in Monday, and Tuesday's game between Connecticut and Notre Dame has taken on an atmosphere that is multiplying the hype exponentially. Notre Dame's Muffet McGraw said "hate" and "lack of civility" would be fair ways to describe her team's rivalry with Connecticut.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas - As soon as Suzy Sanders got word of the shooting at Ft. Hood on Wednesday, she began frantically texting her 21-year-old stepson, a soldier stationed at the Army post. His first chilling reply landed more than an hour later, at 5:22 p.m. "It happened right in front of me Suz," Pvt. Jacob "Jake" Sanders texted. "I watched my sergeant die. I tried to revive him. I'm fine. I love you. " Jake Sanders, a former varsity basketball player from a small town in Indiana, has a brown crew cut, square jaw and wide smile.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy after authorities began to seize his cattle from federal land. Protesters had responded to an alert that promised: "Range war begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!" Federal officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Capitol, home to inspiring statues of Andrew Jackson, Sam Houston, Ronald Reagan. And Lucille Ball? A group seeking to increase the number of women represented in the Capitol's collection of statues includes the red-headed comedian on a list of California women who should be considered for Washington's version of a national hall of fame. Since 1864, each state has been authorized to place statues of two of its distinguished deceased citizens in the Capitol.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
CARRIZO SPRINGS, Texas - Just a few years ago this was a sleepy town of 5,600, and people eked out a living from the land. They farmed, worked ranches and leased their property to hunters to make a few dollars. Now, an oil and gas boom is transforming the economy of south Texas, turning Carrizo Springs into a busy city of at least 40,000. Texas oil companies, tapping a vast formation called the Eagle Ford shale, have nearly doubled oil production over the last two years and by next year are expected to produce 4 million barrels a day. That would catapult Texas ahead of Iran, Iraq and the United Arab Emirates to become the fifth-biggest oil producer in the world.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2010 | By DeeDee Correll
The advertisement appeared on Craigslist in early December. "Need a real aggressive man with no concern for women," read the posting on the Internet classified advertising forum. Its purported author was a Casper, Wyo., woman, whose photo also was posted. One week later, a man accepted the offer, forcing his way into the woman's home, tying her up and raping her at knifepoint. "I'll show you aggressive," he allegedly said, according to court testimony. In fact, authorities say, the woman had nothing to do with the ad. Instead, they say, a former boyfriend had posted it, soliciting her assault.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
California-based Virgin America ranked highest among the nation's top 15 carriers in a study that looked at on-time performance, customer complaints and lost bag rates, among other factors. The study, known as the Airline Quality Rating report, also found that airline performance improved in 2013 over the previous year. The ratings report was produced by researchers at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Wichita State University and was based on data collected by the U.S.
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Chris Dufresne
ARLINGTON, Texas - Kentucky freshman guard Aaron Harrison launched a last-seconds three-point shot Monday from the same spot he'd knocked two straight opponents out of the tournament. This time he didn't make it, though, and this time it didn't matter. Connecticut didn't just defeat Kentucky, 60-54, to win the NCAA title Monday night before a crowd of 79,238 at AT&T Stadium. BOX SCORE: Connecticut 60, Kentucky 54 Connecticut never trailed in the game, going wire to wire to cap a tournament run that was even more improbable than Kentucky's.
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