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NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Christopher Reynolds
A new art show in Washington, D.C., spotlights national park posters from the Depression years, including the frothy falls of Yellowstone, the jagged mountains of Glacier and the native ruins of Bandelier National Monument. Titled “Posterity,” the show at the U.S. Department of the Interior Museum is built around six original posters that date to the Depression years. But it also includes later reproductions and contemporary posters in similar style, covering more than three dozen parks and wildlife refuges.
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SPORTS
April 13, 2014 | By Dan Wiederer
AUGUSTA, Ga. - If you remember the first time Bubba Watson won the Masters - heck, the two-year anniversary was just Tuesday - that victory came with high drama and a legendary shot: Watson's hooked, gap-wedge magic trick to the green from deep in the pine straw on the final playoff hole at Augusta National. “Made me famous,” Watson acknowledged. So on Sunday evening when he arrived at the final green with a three-shot advantage and a long, fast birdie putt, Watson simply needed reassurance that he was in such a comfortable position.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
A high-stakes battle is underway in Washington over launching the U.S. government's most sophisticated national security satellites. Space entrepreneur Elon Musk is pitted against the nation's two largest weapons makers, Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp., in a fight for military contracts worth as much as $70 billion through 2030. For eight years, the Pentagon has paid Boeing and Lockheed - operating jointly as United Launch Alliance - to launch the government's pricey spy satellites without seeking competitive bids.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Meg James and Ryan Faughnder
CBS has "The Big Bang Theory" and its boss has an astronomical paycheck. Leslie Moonves, the network's chief executive, was awarded a $66.9-million compensation package last year, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing Friday. That was up nearly 8% from the $62.2-million package he got in 2012, a year that also kept Moonves ‎in a rarefied group of the nation's most handsomely compensated corporate executives. Moonves was paid $3.5 million in salary and received a $28.5-million bonus.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Unless one is Native American, getting a grasp of complex Native American spiritual cosmologies is not easy. And that distinction, which might be called a quality of profound otherness, is in essence what drives a fascinating show recently opened at the Autry National Center of the American West in Griffith Park. It's a story of survival, of a will to endure in the face of crushing opposition. And it is a story told through beads. "Floral Journey: Native North American Beadwork" might sound like a simple decorative display of ornamented handiwork.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Allen E. Puckett, one of the engineers who after World War II built Los Angeles-based Hughes Aircraft Co. into the nation's leading defense electronics firm - dominant in the markets for air defense, radar systems, tactical missiles and satellites - has died. He was 94. One of the nation's top technologists and defense executives during the Cold War, Puckett died March 31 at his home in Pacific Palisades after suffering a stroke. His wife, Marilyn, confirmed his death. "Allen Puckett was one of the guiding spirits of Hughes Aircraft," said Malcolm Currie, a former deputy defense secretary who later followed in Puckett's footsteps as another president of the company.
TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Chuck Graham
You don't have to travel all the way to East Africa to go on safari. Grab your binoculars and camera and scan the 50-mile-long Carrizo Plain National Monument for its array of wildlife. Carrizo Plain, about 100 miles northwest of Los Angeles and known as California's Serengeti, is the largest single native grassland remaining in the Golden State. It's home to the highest concentration of endangered species in California. Drive slowly on Soda Lake Road and search for herds of pronghorn antelope and Tule elk. The real challenge will be spotting rarer critters such as the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, San Joaquin kit fox, San Joaquin antelope ground squirrel and giant kangaroo rat. Don't ignore old fence posts either, favorite perches for raptors such as ferruginous and red-tailed hawks, prairie falcons and American kestrels.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Jay Jones, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
An array of cultural experiences awaits visitors to Albuquerque later this month during the Gathering of Nations. The gathering ,  billed as the world's largest assembly of indigenous peoples, will welcome tens of thousands of members from more than 700 Native American tribes plus aboriginal people from Canada and beyond. The first event, the Miss Indian World talent show, will be at 7 p.m. April 24 at the Albuquerque Convention Center. The April 25 and 26 activities at the University of New Mexico arena are highlighted by the "Grand Entry," during which thousands of people in traditional garb enter the area to the sound of hundreds of beating drums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Zeituni Onyango, an aunt of President Obama whose bid for asylum in the United States received national attention during her nephew's first campaign for the presidency and contributed to the debate over illegal immigration, died Tuesday in Boston. She was 61. Onyango had been treated in recent months for cancer and respiratory problems, said Cleveland attorney Margaret Wong, who represented Onyango in her immigration case. A half sister of Obama's late father, Onyango moved from Kenya to the U.S. in 2000.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2014 | By David Pierson and Tiffany Hsu
Come grilling season, expect your sirloin steak to come with a hearty side of sticker shock. Beef prices have reached all-time highs in the U.S. and aren't expected to come down any time soon. Extreme weather has thinned the nation's beef cattle herds to levels last seen in 1951, when there were about half as many mouths to feed in America. "We've seen strong prices before but nothing this extreme," said Dennis Smith, a commodities broker for Archer Financial Services in Chicago.
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