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NATIONAL
June 4, 2009 | Anna Gorman
Historical government files that chronicle the lives of immigrants in the U.S. will become part of the National Archives instead of being destroyed, officials announced Wednesday. The files could reveal the untold stories of millions of immigrants, including scores of Jews who fled Europe after World War II and Chinese who came to the U.S. as part of the diaspora.
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NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
Over the next two weeks, the Clinton Library and the National Archives will release as many as 33,000 pages of presidential records from Bill Clinton's years in the White House - creating a trove of new documents for Hillary Clinton's friends and foes to sift through as she weighs a 2016 presidential run.    The National Archives and Records Administration announced Thursday afternoon that the first 4,000 to 5,000 pages of the previously confidential...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1989
In the article "Pinkerton's Nuggets" (Metro, Feb. 20), staff writer Amy Pyle incorrectly identified the National Archives as the repository of some of the original Pinkerton National Detective Agency material. This collection, approximately 2,000 items, is in the possession of the Library of Congress. The National Archives, which is the repository of permanently valuable documents created by the federal government, does not have any Pinkerton material in its holdings, with the exception of the wanted poster for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Jason Wells
The final installment of 94 White House tapes recorded during a turbulent period of Richard Nixon's administration were released Wednesday at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda. The tapes cover a period from April 9 to July 12, 1973, as Watergate was bearing down on the administration. Included in the hours of secretly taped conversations are discussions of the Vietnam War peace settlement and the return of prisoners of war, tensions over “most favored nation” trade status for the Soviet Union and other key foreign policy issues of the time.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The National Archives in New York City is shifting its office and bringing a new exhibition space to Lower Manhattan this month. The keeper of the Constitution and other vital U.S. documents will move into the historic Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House at 1 Bowling Green, a building it will share with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. The new office opens to the public Friday and will provide a more museum-like setting than the agency's previous spot in Greenwich Village . An inaugural show in the building's rotunda titled "The World's Port: Through Documents of the National Archives" tells the story of the city's trade history through photos and documents.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2010 | By Barbara Barrett
Until recently, David Ferriero's favorite artifact at the National Archives was the canceled $7.2-million check -- "an actual check!" -- that was used to purchase the territory of Alaska back in 1868. But this month, Ferriero, the archives' new director, saw an old American Indian treaty in a secret vault. It was etched on parchment and festooned with ribbons and, he recalled, "a string of the most beautiful cobalt blue and white beads." "Wampum!" he exclaimed in a recent interview.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The public will be able to purchase copies of thousands of historic films and videotapes via the Internet under an agreement the National Archives has reached with Amazon.com Inc. and one of its subsidiaries. The nonexclusive arrangement allows Amazon and its CustomFlix Labs Inc. to make digitized copies of some footage and make it available in DVD form. The DVDs will sell for $19.99 on Amazon.com and will be manufactured at CustomFlix's facility in Scotts Valley, Calif.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
It's still unclear whether Sarah Palin's road trip is an educational family tour of historical America or a dry run for her potential Republican presidential bid. But Monday, two things became clear: She will not shy away from unscripted encounters, and she isn't going let anyone know in advance where she's going as she wends her way across the country this summer. In an impromptu news conference Monday evening in the parking lot of her Gettysburg hotel shortly after taking a four-mile run in steaming heat, Palin said she thought the current crop of Republican presidential contenders is "strong" and that any campaign she might wage "would definitely be unconventional and nontraditional, yes, knowing us, yeah, it would have to be. " And that was as far as she would go, leaving the former Alaska governor's intentions, like much of her bus tour, a mystery.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | Associated Press
Professional archivist Don W. Wilson took over as head of the National Archives on Friday and pledged "a broader office and an expanded mission" for the agency that keeps historical records and runs presidential libraries. Wilson, who has held key posts at the Dwight D. Eisenhower and Gerald R. Ford presidential libraries, took his oath of office in a ceremony in front of the display cases holding the Constitution and Declaration of Independence in the rotunda of the Archives building.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The National Archives agreed to seal previously public CIA and Pentagon records and to keep silent about the role of U.S. intelligence in the reclassification, according to an agreement released under the Freedom of Information Act. The 2002 agreement, requested three years ago by the Associated Press and released this week, shows archivists were concerned about reclassifying previously available documents -- many of them more than 50 years old -- but nonetheless agreed to keep mum.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2013 | By Devin Kelly, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Drowsy from watching hours of unedited World War II film footage, Ray Begovich snapped to attention when one eight-second snippet flashed before him. Begovich, a journalism professor at Franklin College in Indiana, was visiting the National Archives in College Park, Md., doing research for a biography on President Franklin Roosevelt's director of war information. The 16-millimeter film showed Roosevelt visiting the Navy's U.S. heavy cruiser Baltimore on July 26, 1944.  FOR THE RECORD: Roosevelt wheelchair: An article in the July 14 Section A about rare film footage showing President Franklin D. Roosevelt in a moving wheelchair said that President Clinton dedicated a statue in 2006 depicting Roosevelt in a wheelchair.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON - So what do you give to the leader of the free world? If you're German Chancellor Angela Merkel, you might hint that Obama could work on his putting. Merkel presented an estimated $1,400 in putting gear, including a pair of Kramski putters (complete with head covers) and the book “The Kramski Putt Philosophy.” Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper appealed to Obama's other favorite sport with a basketball signed by the 2010-2011 Toronto Raptors, a team that finished the season with a 22-60 record - including a 1-3 record against Obama's Chicago Bulls.
OPINION
April 25, 2013 | By James K. Glassman
As former President George W. Bush, joined by President Obama and three living former presidents, dedicates his library this week in Dallas, it's important to remember that presidential libraries are relatively new. In 1941, while he was still in office, Franklin D. Roosevelt established the first such archive in Hyde Park, N.Y., to preserve personal papers and mementos from his time in office. His successor, Harry Truman, signed the Presidential Libraries Act into law, authorizing the National Archives to help set up and operate these treasure troves of American politics and policy.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The National Archives in New York City is shifting its office and bringing a new exhibition space to Lower Manhattan this month. The keeper of the Constitution and other vital U.S. documents will move into the historic Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House at 1 Bowling Green, a building it will share with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. The new office opens to the public Friday and will provide a more museum-like setting than the agency's previous spot in Greenwich Village . An inaugural show in the building's rotunda titled "The World's Port: Through Documents of the National Archives" tells the story of the city's trade history through photos and documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
With the help of a national volunteer project involving more than 100,000 people, 1940 census records for California and more than two dozen other states have now been indexed by name and can be searched online for free. Individual records from the 1940 census were released April 2, the first time such a cache of historic census documents has been made available on the Internet. The release was an online hit, so much so that the National Archives and Records Administration website was overwhelmed on the first day as millions of family history buffs and others tried to view the records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Americans responded in overwhelming numbers Monday to the online release of detailed information from the 1940 census — the first time such a trove of historic census records has been available on the Internet. Minutes after its launch, the 1940 census portal on the National Archives and Record Administration website was all but impenetrable. Officials apologized and promised the website would be accessible as soon as possible. "In the first three hours, we had 22.5 million hits," said Susan Cooper, spokeswoman for the National Archives.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1991 | From Associated Press
Homes are aglow with Thomas Edison's electric light bulb. Billions have flown since Wilbur and Orville Wright invented the flying machine. But whatever happened to Charles Hess and his piano that unfolds into a bed? Maybe Hess should have hired a good salesman. Come to think of it, Christian Henry Eisenbrandt of Baltimore never struck it rich with his "Life-Preserving Coffin in Doubtful Cases of Actual Death." His casket came equipped with an air vent and pop-open lid, just in case.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Google Inc. started offering films from the U.S. National Archives as part of an effort to expand the content offered on its online video service. The free clips include World War II newsreels and the Apollo 11 landing on the moon, the Mountain View, Calif., company said. The agreement, which includes a pilot program of 103 films, isn't exclusive. Google has digitized the films at no cost to the government, a National Archives spokeswoman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
During his five-year overhaul of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, Cold War historian Timothy Naftali won wide praise for transforming a much-ridiculed institution into a house of serious scholarship under the auspices of the National Archives and Records Administration. Yet nobody was surprised that the private Richard Nixon Foundation — run by fierce loyalists of the former president — didn't honor Naftali when he left as director last month to join a think tank and write a book.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
It's still unclear whether Sarah Palin's road trip is an educational family tour of historical America or a dry run for her potential Republican presidential bid. But Monday, two things became clear: She will not shy away from unscripted encounters, and she isn't going let anyone know in advance where she's going as she wends her way across the country this summer. In an impromptu news conference Monday evening in the parking lot of her Gettysburg hotel shortly after taking a four-mile run in steaming heat, Palin said she thought the current crop of Republican presidential contenders is "strong" and that any campaign she might wage "would definitely be unconventional and nontraditional, yes, knowing us, yeah, it would have to be. " And that was as far as she would go, leaving the former Alaska governor's intentions, like much of her bus tour, a mystery.
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