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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2008 | Joe Holley, Washington Post
John E. Taylor, a scholar known for his encyclopedic knowledge of World War II intelligence records and his ability to find the most arcane material in the National Archives, where he worked for 63 years, died of congestive heart failure Sept. 20 at his home in Washington, D.C. He was 87. Thousands of scholars, writers, journalists and other researchers relied on Taylor's grasp of history and his familiarity with archival material. Writers who depended on his expertise included Stephen Ambrose, James Bamford and Barbara Tuchman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2007 | Patricia Sullivan, The Washington Post
Robert Warner, who led the National Archives to independence while dealing with Reagan-era budget cuts and criticism over the release of Oval Office recordings, died of a heart attack April 24 at Arbor Hospice and Home Care in Ann Arbor, Mich. He was 79.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
At least once a week for the past 10 years, Lois Salmans' search for her ancestors has taken her from her Newport Beach home to a massive, pyramid-shaped building nestled in the hills of Laguna Niguel. There, in the National Archives on the first floor of the seven-tiered Chet Holifield Building, Salmans spends nearly eight hours glued to a microfilm reader, poring over names in federal census schedules dating back to 1790.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2007 | From the Associated Press
An intern with the National Archives stole about 165 Civil War documents -- including the War Department's announcement of President Lincoln's death -- and sold most of them on EBay, prosecutors charged Thursday. Denning McTague, who runs a website that sells rare books, worked at a National Archives and Records Administration site in Philadelphia last summer, prosecutors said.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2005 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger, President Clinton's national security advisor, has agreed to plead guilty to a misdemeanor charge of removing classified documents from the National Archives, a Justice Department official said Thursday. Berger is expected to enter his plea this afternoon before U.S. Magistrate Judge Deborah A. Robinson in Washington. He faces a maximum penalty of up to one year in jail, a $100,000 fine and a year of supervised release. "Mr.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are tape-recorded oral history interviews, numbering in the hundreds and containing some answers to the mystery that was Richard Nixon. But they remain under lock and key, bound up in boxes, accessible to no one. Not even the late President's daughters are allowed to hear them. They can be found here, in a regional office of the National Archives. The government has them sealed, leaving them in what the agency's Washington spokeswoman calls "legal limbo."
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began when an astute federal worker was shopping on EBay and came across a treasure that should not have been for sale anywhere, much less an Internet auction house: a pardon signed by an American president. It ended Monday when a veteran employee of the National Archives was charged with stealing priceless historical treasures and selling them on the open market, including a pardon signed by Abraham Lincoln and an autographed photograph of Neil Armstrong on the moon. Shawn P.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under court order, the National Archives in Maryland will begin the arduous task Monday of slicing up 3,700 hours of secretly recorded tapes from President Richard Nixon's years in the White House. When the dicing is done, 820 hours of the original taped personal discussions will become the property of the Nixon estate, as demanded under a federal court ruling. The rest will be released publicly.
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