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January 31, 1991 | STEVEN K. WAGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Each spring, John Paciorek remembers. He remembers a sweltering autumn day in 1963. He remembers a Colt Stadium crowd in Houston that cheered his every move, both at the plate and in the field. And he remembers his own performance, one that might never be matched. That day, 18-year-old John Paciorek made baseball history. On Sept.
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SPORTS
April 8, 2010 | MARK HEISLER
Once upon a time in the West. . .. There was once a mighty conference that fell into ruin until last season, when no team could come closer than 11 games behind the Lakers. Unfortunately for the Lakers, it turned out to be a very brief time. With all eight playoff teams on pace to post 50-59 wins and heating up since the All-Star break — well, except for the Lakers — any West team really can beat any other. Forget the Cleveland Cavaliers. If the Lakers play well enough to see the Cavaliers, they'd have every chance of beating them.
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SPORTS
August 23, 1998 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine Mayor Christina Shea received a curious telephone call last fall. The caller told Shea he represented an NBA team interested in moving to the city, though he declined to identify himself or the team. That unsolicited call, sketchy as it was, resuscitated spirits in the offices of the Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim. Tony Guanci, a Newport Beach resident and a sports industry consultant, was the mystery caller.
SPORTS
June 30, 2009 | Mike Bresnahan
Blame it on the economy. Or that so few NBA teams are far enough under the salary cap to sign an impact free agent. Or that many more big names -- LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh among them -- could be available next summer. Whatever the reason, free agency won't be a free-for-all when it starts Wednesday, even though Lakers fans might expect otherwise since forwards Lamar Odom and Trevor Ariza are able to sign with any team that winks back at them.
SPORTS
July 15, 1991 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI and SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It appears that the U.S. men's Olympic basketball roster will include only two collegiate players and possibly as few as one. According to Duke Coach Mike Krzyzewski, an assistant on the 1992 U.S. Olympic staff and a member of several prominent USA Basketball selection committees, the number of college players included on team could vary from one to three, although "people are leaning to two."
SPORTS
September 30, 1988 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Two British athletes, sprinter Linford Christie and a judo medalist, tested positive for drugs in the first round of testing, the British Olympic Assn. said Friday. Christie, a former European champion and a silver medalist in the men's 100 meters, tested positive for pseudoephedrine, association spokeswoman Caroline Searle said. Searle described the drug as "a low-dose stimulant found in cold and hay fever preparations."
SPORTS
June 4, 1990 | RICHARD SANDOMIR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the beginning, there was the bobble-head doll. The impish, jiggling figurine was the first big sales success in the early days of the National Football League's licensing business. That was more than 30 years ago, when T-shirts were T-shirts, when only players wore authentic jerseys with names on their backs, and when no one thought of sweatsuits as being in style.
SPORTS
November 5, 1989 | PHIL JACKMAN, BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
Whoever set up the exhibition slate for the expansion Minnesota Timberwolves certainly knew how to get the lads ready for a typical week in the National Basketball Association: five games in a half-dozen nights with stops in Fargo, N.D., Sioux City, Iowa, New Haven, Conn., Lexington, Ky., and Green Bay, Wis. Plus there was one missing bus, two canceled flights and a middle-of-the-night retrograde movement from a fleabag hotel.
SPORTS
November 2, 1994 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another opening, another show, thankfully. Beset by problems as it left the stage last June to the yawns of a bored nation, so scorned that a preseason yearbook ran a cover asking "Is the NBA Dead?" it returns on Friday to the gratitude of sports-starved Americans. Who would have thought all it had to do to reclaim its cachet as "the league that works" was play a game?
SPORTS
November 5, 1994 | MICHAEL ARACE, HARTFORD COURANT
The people who run the National Basketball Association have been thinking quite a bit about which weapons their fans prefer -- rapiers or broadswords. The rapier is offense. It is thrust and parry, skill and smarts, daring and savvy. It is the stuff of highlights. The broadsword is defense. It is sweat and grit, strength and will, stamina and machismo. It is the stuff of a common man well motivated.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
In the great circle of life known as the professional sports league calendar, we're about to follow up the crowning of the NBA champions with the ritual of the NBA draft.
SPORTS
March 29, 2009 | Mark Heisler
Here's an update on the 2010 free-agent class with LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh, Amare Stoudemire, et al.: There isn't going to be one. The entire league is buzzing about The Lockout of 2011, as if David Stern just rode across the sky in a flaming chariot with a scythe, spelling "Repent by 2011" with his exhaust. "I think it's going to be very, very extreme, because I think that the times are extreme," former super-agent David Falk told the New York Times.
SPORTS
December 19, 2008 | DIANE PUCIN, ON THE MEDIA
It is the hot show among NBA players. At least that's what Gary Payton's text messages tell him. The "NBA GameTime Live" show on Tuesday nights on the NBA TV channel features Payton talking trash, stats and sometimes even cooking with studio host Ahmad Rashad and, as Payton calls him, "the good cop, Chris Webber." "Of course," Payton says, "I'm the bad cop." Payton's chuckle crackles over the phone line.
SPORTS
December 10, 2008 | Diane Pucin, Diane Pucin is a Times staff writer.
The NBA is going to announce today that it will present its All-Star Saturday night program of the slam dunk contest, three-point shooting contest and skill challenge in a three-dimensional format at 80 movie theaters around the country Feb. 14. "This is about embracing new technology and being innovative," said David Levy, president of Turner Broadcasting Sales Inc. and Turner Sports. Levy said he is not concerned that the theater showing would negatively affect television ratings on TNT.
SPORTS
June 25, 1996 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once children spoke when spoken to, looked both ways before crossing the street and respected their elders, but those days ended (right after today's adults grew up, according to them). Today's brash kids are increasingly elbowing adults out of the way in gymnastics, tennis and now the NBA draft. Forty-two underclassmen, including three high school players, made themselves eligible for the draft, more than doubling the old record.
SPORTS
November 11, 1995 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ontario Labor Relations Board shot a hole in the NBA's lockout of its referees Friday, ruling the league can no longer use replacement officials at Toronto Raptor home games. The NBA immediately announced that it will assign three regular referees to work--but only in Toronto--starting with Wednesday's game against the Houston Rockets. Replacements will continue working the other games. Yet to be learned is what the regular referees will do.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2008 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
The NBA and the Los Angeles sports and entertainment firm AEG announced plans Tuesday to help develop a $280-million arena and recreation center for the Shanghai World Expo in 2010 -- the first of a dozen multipurpose arenas that the new joint venture hopes to build in China.
SPORTS
June 22, 2008 | Mark Heisler
Well, it was semi-classic, anyway. You couldn't say the quote, unquote, Renewal of the Storied Lakers-Celtics Rivalry, lived up to everyone's expectations, especially around here. After blowing a 24-point lead in Game 4 that was probably the biggest in Finals history and getting humiliated in Game 6, the Lakers are like their 1984 team that coughed up a title to the Celtics . . . living in the hope of a rematch next spring. In the meantime, Lakers fans can take this summer off.
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