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National Book Critics Circle

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March 14, 2009 | Associated Press
The late Roberto Bolano's "2666" received the fiction prize from the National Book Critics Circle. Other winners Thursday night included Ariel Sabar's "My Father's Paradise" for autobiography, Dexter Filkins' "The Forever War" for general nonfiction and Patrick French's "The World Is What It Is: The Authorized Biography of V.S. Naipaul" for biography. For the first time in the awards' 35-year history, two winners were named for one category: August Kleinzahler's "Sleeping It Off in Rapid City" and Juan Felipe Herrera's "Half of the World in Light: New and Selected Poems" shared the poetry prize.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
After a long legal battle, Penguin Books India has agreed to remove a book about Hinduism from circulation in India, and to destroy all copies of book in the country, a decision that drew immediate criticism from writers and literary groups around the world. The Hindu nationalist group Shiksha Bachao Andolan filed a civil suit against Penguin Books India in 2011, claiming that Wendy Doniger's “The Hindus: An Alternative History,”  disparaged Hinduism and was guilty of  “deliberate and malicious acts intended to outrage religious feelings.”  Doniger, a professor of religion at the University of Chicago, said in a statement released by PEN Delhi that she lamented her publisher's decision to settle the suit with the group.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The board of the National Book Critics Circle announced the finalists for its 2013 awards Monday. There are five finalists each in six categories: autobiography, biography, criticism, fiction, nonfiction and poetry. The NBCC announced the recipients of three additional awards. The John Leonard Prize for First book, awarded for the first time, goes to Antony Marra for his novel "A Constellation of Vital Phenomena. " The winner of the 2013 Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing goes to critic Katherine A. Powers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The board of the National Book Critics Circle announced the finalists for its 2013 awards Monday. There are five finalists each in six categories: autobiography, biography, criticism, fiction, nonfiction and poetry. The NBCC announced the recipients of three additional awards. The John Leonard Prize for First book, awarded for the first time, goes to Antony Marra for his novel "A Constellation of Vital Phenomena. " The winner of the 2013 Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing goes to critic Katherine A. Powers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from New York -- The National Book Critics Circle gave its 2011 fiction prize to Edith Pearlman, an under-the-radar writer of short stories, at its annual awards ceremony Thursday evening at the New School. Pearlman won for her collection "Binocular Vision: New and Selected Stories," published by the small independent press Lookout Books, an imprint of the University of North Carolina Wilmington. "I thought if I won I would faint," Pearlman said as she reached the podium to accept her award.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Junot Diaz's "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" was named the year's best work of fiction, and Edwidge Danticat's memoir "Brother, I'm Dying" won as best nonfiction work in a poll of more than 100 authors and critics conducted by the National Book Critics Circle. Among the writers who participated were John Updike, Anne Tyler, Walter Isaacson, Jane Smiley, Cynthia Ozick, Jonathan Lethem and Sue Miller.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
First-time novelist Ben Fountain won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction Thursday for “Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk,” a darkly comic send-up of the emotional and cultural aftermath of the Iraq War. The awards were announced in a ceremony in New York. Roberto Caro won the biography award for “The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson,” the fourth installment in Caro's magisterial biography of the thirty-sixth president. The winner in the nonfiction category was Andrew Solomon, for “Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity,” a book which the critics' citation described as “a groundbreaking look at family relationships with children who are radically different from their parents' expectations in physical, mental, and behavioral ways.” Other winners included, in poetry, D.A. Powell for “Useless Landscape, or A Guide for Boys," and in criticism, Marina Warner for "Stranger Magic: Charmed States and the Arabian Nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
J.K. Rowling wrote "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone" as a single mum on the dole. Seven books, 4,100 pages and a blockbuster film series later, she's one of the wealthiest authors on the planet - worth more than $900 million. That's about as close as any author ever gets to a sure thing. Yet Rowling has walked away from Harry Potter into uncharted territory. On Thursday, her novel "The Casual Vacancy" hits shelves and e-bookstores. Little is known about it beyond the basics: It's a contemporary, realistic novel written for adults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from New York -- The National Book Critics Circle gave its 2011 fiction prize to Edith Pearlman, an under-the-radar writer of short stories, at its annual awards ceremony Thursday evening at the New School. Pearlman won for her collection "Binocular Vision: New and Selected Stories," published by the small independent press Lookout Books, an imprint of the University of North Carolina Wilmington. "I thought if I won I would faint," Pearlman said as she reached the podium to accept her award.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Jennifer Egan was not built for the spotlight. "When I was a teenager, one of my sources of angst was that I felt like I was not an actor, I was always a spectator," she said by phone from New York. "Later, I realized that that's just who I am. That's actually my job. " Lately, Egan has been much more than a spectator in her own life. Her novel "A Visit From the Goon Squad," a fractured narrative about time and connection that stretches from 1970s punk rock San Francisco to a futuristic desert home, was recently awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | Scott Timberg
John Freeman, a longtime book critic who recently became the editor of the literary magazine Granta, has written a new book called "The Tyranny of E-Mail: The Four-Thousand-Year Journey to Your Inbox" (Simon & Schuster: 256 pp., $25). He's conceived of the subject in the broadest possible terms: He begins with an ancient Sumerian love poem, tracks the history of communication from the Persian Empire in the 6th century, the Arabian use of pigeons, the growth of literacy, the golden age of letter-writing in 19th century Europe, up to the telegraph, ZIP Codes and development of computers.
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